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By Tracy Sahler and Tracy Sahler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 1998
LEONARDTOWN -- Oysters and cheesecake? What sounds like an unusual pairing turned out to be the perfect combination for Dawn L. Brown of Baltimore, whose Oyster Cheesecakes With Oyster Sauce and Caviar Garnish won the $1,000 grand prize at the 19th annual National Oyster Cook-Off here earlier this month.Brown, 31, is a first-year student at the Baltimore International College. She stirred whole oysters into a savory cheesecake mixture, baked them and then topped them with caviar and oyster sauce.
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By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 21, 2007
This is a quick and low-fat Chinese meal to rival your local favorite restaurant. I have used only vegetables, which I chose for their variety of flavors, colors and textures. Most supermarkets sell fresh Chinese noodles in the refrigerated section of the produce department. Dried Chinese noodles can be found in the Chinese or Oriental food section of the market. Either type works fine. If authentic noodles are difficult to find, use thin spaghettini. Lo mein actually means mixed noodles.
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By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,Orlando Sentinel | January 16, 1991
For years, Americans have heard about the health benefits of eating like the Chinese. Properly prepared Oriental food is generally lower in fat and higher in complex carbohydrates than typical Western fare.Steamed Shrimp Dumplings 8 ounces raw shrimp, peeled and deveined (about 16 large shrimp)8 ounces ground turkey2 green onions, finely minced1 large stalk celery, finely chopped (about 1 cup)1 tablespoon rice wine or dry sherry1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce1 teaspoon sesame oil (available in Oriental markets)
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 20, 2005
You could say that Aquatica in Havre de Grace is a mom-and-pop operation. Mark Laubner, formerly host of Channel 2's Entertaining Seafood, and his wife, Kelly, have opened their new restaurant where a pit beef place used to be. But this mom-and-pop operation, on a busy stretch of Pulaski Highway, is not like any other you've ever been to. The restaurant, fancifully decorated, specializes in upscale seafood with a Pan-Asian accent and boasts a lengthy wine...
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By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,Orlando Sentinel | March 6, 1991
From ancient times, the Chinese have endowed some foods with symbolism. Broccoli and other dark green vegetables are among these foods because their rich, verdant color is thought to represent youth, good health and the lucky stone, jade.Today, health conscious eaters are discovering the link between good health and food to be much more that Chinese folk lore. Broccoli is high in fiber, carbohydrates and vitamins C and A. It also contains a fair amount of calcium, potassium and other valuable nutrients.
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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | April 20, 1994
One of my favorite recipe collections is "Chopstix," by Hugh Carpenter, which blends American cuisine so simply with Chinese, Thai and even Mexican flavors. This dish, Oriental burritos, marries the most classic Chinese flavorings with south-of-the-border style. Since it can be eaten by hand, it makes for a casual, friendly meal.To round out the main dish, serve a simple salad of shredded lettuce and quickly steamed snow peas (or buy frozen, stemmed snow peas and thaw before tossing) and a peeled, sliced fresh orange.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 21, 2007
This is a quick and low-fat Chinese meal to rival your local favorite restaurant. I have used only vegetables, which I chose for their variety of flavors, colors and textures. Most supermarkets sell fresh Chinese noodles in the refrigerated section of the produce department. Dried Chinese noodles can be found in the Chinese or Oriental food section of the market. Either type works fine. If authentic noodles are difficult to find, use thin spaghettini. Lo mein actually means mixed noodles.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | May 19, 2004
These days one of the latest trends in kitchen designs is having a second oven, either in the wall or in the range. Linda Stephen's new cookbook, 125 Best Toaster Oven Recipes (Robert Rose Inc., 2004, $18.95), points out that many of us already have a second oven sitting on our countertop. Stephen notes that almost anything you can cook in a regular oven you can cook in a toaster oven. That may come as a surprise to most of us who use our toaster ovens mainly to toast bagels and bake chicken nuggets for the kids.
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By William Rice and William Rice,Chicago Tribune | May 17, 1995
One of the most refreshing aspects of Ken Hom's approach to cooking is that it's very down-to-earth.The kitchen pictured on the cover of his eighth book, "Ken Hom's Chinese Kitchen" (Hyperion, $29.95), is his own in Berkeley, Calif. It's comfortable, practical and well worn, a welcoming gathering place as well as a laboratory. For the past 15 years, Mr. Hom -- teacher, chef and author -- has cooked and entertained there and gone on the road to do classes, demonstrations and a television series.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2004
There are several China Woks scattered around Baltimore. The one in Towson, in the York Road Plaza, is an ambience-free carryout with dependable service that works well for parents looking to feed kids after Little League games. Unfortunately, on our recent visit, we came across little to recommend in the cuisine department. As with so many low-cost Chinese restaurants, this China Wok seems determined not to upset customers by over-seasoning any of its food. For appetizers, we tried steamed pork dumplings ($3.95)
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By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2004
There are several China Woks scattered around Baltimore. The one in Towson, in the York Road Plaza, is an ambience-free carryout with dependable service that works well for parents looking to feed kids after Little League games. Unfortunately, on our recent visit, we came across little to recommend in the cuisine department. As with so many low-cost Chinese restaurants, this China Wok seems determined not to upset customers by over-seasoning any of its food. For appetizers, we tried steamed pork dumplings ($3.95)
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | May 19, 2004
These days one of the latest trends in kitchen designs is having a second oven, either in the wall or in the range. Linda Stephen's new cookbook, 125 Best Toaster Oven Recipes (Robert Rose Inc., 2004, $18.95), points out that many of us already have a second oven sitting on our countertop. Stephen notes that almost anything you can cook in a regular oven you can cook in a toaster oven. That may come as a surprise to most of us who use our toaster ovens mainly to toast bagels and bake chicken nuggets for the kids.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 27, 2001
Located just off busy Clarksville Pike, Fast Wok offers solidly standard Chinese fare, according to the owner, Joe Yu. With more than 120 entrees to choose from, there's chow mein or chop suey; egg foo young; lo mein; curry; and large varieties of chicken, pork, beef and seafood entrees. You can start your meal with one of Fast Wok's appetizers: Crab Meat Rangoon (crab meat and cream cheese wrapped in wonton and deep fried), Shrimp Toast (marinated shrimp with sesame on top, deep fried)
FEATURES
By Lauren Beale and Lauren Beale,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 14, 2000
Meat and potatoes are a classic combination and a sure-fire winner for a Father's Day barbecue this Sunday. Up until two years ago, I had never prepared a tri-tip and had just passed it by when I saw it at the market or advertised for sale. Then a friend of mine mentioned how much the girls on her daughter's basketball team loved to have tri-tip at their team dinners. Following her scant advice on how best to prepare it on the grill, my first several tries were hardly memorable. But through trial and error, I discovered two secrets to a tender, succulent tri-tip: tenderizing with a meat fork and a 48-hour marinade.
FEATURES
By Tracy Sahler and Tracy Sahler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 1998
LEONARDTOWN -- Oysters and cheesecake? What sounds like an unusual pairing turned out to be the perfect combination for Dawn L. Brown of Baltimore, whose Oyster Cheesecakes With Oyster Sauce and Caviar Garnish won the $1,000 grand prize at the 19th annual National Oyster Cook-Off here earlier this month.Brown, 31, is a first-year student at the Baltimore International College. She stirred whole oysters into a savory cheesecake mixture, baked them and then topped them with caviar and oyster sauce.
FEATURES
By William Rice and William Rice,Chicago Tribune | May 17, 1995
One of the most refreshing aspects of Ken Hom's approach to cooking is that it's very down-to-earth.The kitchen pictured on the cover of his eighth book, "Ken Hom's Chinese Kitchen" (Hyperion, $29.95), is his own in Berkeley, Calif. It's comfortable, practical and well worn, a welcoming gathering place as well as a laboratory. For the past 15 years, Mr. Hom -- teacher, chef and author -- has cooked and entertained there and gone on the road to do classes, demonstrations and a television series.
FEATURES
By Barbara Albright and Barbara Albright,Contributing Writer | September 5, 1993
Thai cooking and restaurants seem to be the latest Asian cuisine to tantalize the taste buds of Americans.Just as we are beginning to understand the lingo of Chinese restaurants, along comes a brand new set of ingredients and mystifying menu items to be deciphered.Fortunately, there are some overlapping ingredients between the cuisines. The following is a list of a few of the most common ingredients.* Fresh coriander: Also known as cilantro and Chinese parsley. It is probably one of the most heavily consumed herbs in the world.
FEATURES
By Lauren Beale and Lauren Beale,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 14, 2000
Meat and potatoes are a classic combination and a sure-fire winner for a Father's Day barbecue this Sunday. Up until two years ago, I had never prepared a tri-tip and had just passed it by when I saw it at the market or advertised for sale. Then a friend of mine mentioned how much the girls on her daughter's basketball team loved to have tri-tip at their team dinners. Following her scant advice on how best to prepare it on the grill, my first several tries were hardly memorable. But through trial and error, I discovered two secrets to a tender, succulent tri-tip: tenderizing with a meat fork and a 48-hour marinade.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | April 20, 1994
One of my favorite recipe collections is "Chopstix," by Hugh Carpenter, which blends American cuisine so simply with Chinese, Thai and even Mexican flavors. This dish, Oriental burritos, marries the most classic Chinese flavorings with south-of-the-border style. Since it can be eaten by hand, it makes for a casual, friendly meal.To round out the main dish, serve a simple salad of shredded lettuce and quickly steamed snow peas (or buy frozen, stemmed snow peas and thaw before tossing) and a peeled, sliced fresh orange.
FEATURES
By Barbara Albright and Barbara Albright,Contributing Writer | September 5, 1993
Thai cooking and restaurants seem to be the latest Asian cuisine to tantalize the taste buds of Americans.Just as we are beginning to understand the lingo of Chinese restaurants, along comes a brand new set of ingredients and mystifying menu items to be deciphered.Fortunately, there are some overlapping ingredients between the cuisines. The following is a list of a few of the most common ingredients.* Fresh coriander: Also known as cilantro and Chinese parsley. It is probably one of the most heavily consumed herbs in the world.
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