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NEWS
April 3, 2007
For a quickie lesson in what's wrong with congressional budget earmarks, consider the $4 million-a-year Chesapeake Bay oyster restoration program that benefited most everyone involved except the oysters. As reported by The Sun's Rona Kobell and Greg Garland, a program launched by Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski outside the normal regulatory process has operated for more than half a dozen years with no real federal oversight, functioning mostly as a make-work subsidy plan for watermen that failed to halt the decline of the oyster population.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
- With oysters showing signs of revival in the Chesapeake Bay, some are trying to bring the bivalves back in the bay's second largest tributary, the Potomac River. Just two years into their fledgling effort to restore the river's once-bountiful oyster population, however, organizers are raising alarms about a large marina proposed in Charles County near the Potomac's largest and formerly most productive oyster bar. The 143-slip marina would provide berths for residents and guests of a 900-acre resort community planned on the waterfront here.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | June 25, 1995
Community leaders in Selby Bay say hundreds of their neighbors are ready to fight a state Department of Natural Resources attempt to change a natural oyster bar's mapped boundaries.They say the state's proposal to shrink the 194-acre oyster bar by 61 acres on its western side is aimed at accommodating a marina that is seeking to expand.A challenge to county regulations on marinas is pending before the Court of Special Appeals."It is our contention that DNR is doing this to accommodate an owner of a marina and circumvent the legal process that is already in the works," said Brenda M. DeLalla, president of the Turkey Point Property Owners Association.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
There isn't much I'd change, fundamentally anyway, about Catonsville Gourmet. And based on everything we saw on a Saturday night, from the lines out the front door to the smiles on diners' faces throughout the sprawling restaurant, there's not much anyone else would change. Comfortable, accommodating and upbeat, it's an easy restaurant to like. Since its opening in 2008, the restaurant has been a popular choice, especially for Catonsville residents, who have made it into their gathering spot.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 9, 2009
John E. Larkin Jr., a seafood dealer whose raw oyster bar became a popular downtown gathering place, died of cardiac arrest Sunday at St. Agnes Hospital. The Catonsville resident was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, he attended Leonard Hall Junior Naval Academy and was a 1955 Mount St. Joseph High School graduate. Family members said that he remained close to his teachers, members of the Xaverian Brothers, throughout his life. He entered the seafood business as a young man. Multiple generations of Larkins had worked in the Baltimore seafood industry and owned stalls at Lexington, Hollins and Belair markets.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | July 13, 2009
In less than 20 feet of water, just north of where tankers and cruise ships make their slow turns from the Chesapeake Bay into the Patapsco River, lies the third rail of Maryland fishing. An oyster bar made up of millions of bushels of fossil shell sits on the bay bottom - the largest single deposit left in Maryland's portion of the bay. The state wants to restart its languishing oyster restoration program by digging up as much as 30 percent of the bar - known as Man-O-War Shoal - to serve as a foundation for a $30 million program.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1995
Maryland's second-highest court has blocked an attempt by a Mayo marina to nearly double its size, the second setback for the marina's owners in two weeks.A three-judge panel of the Court of Special Appeals upheld this week Anne Arundel County's law forbidding marinas from building slips within a half-mile of an oyster bar.Two weeks ago, the Department of Natural Resources turned down a request by the owners of the Holiday Point Marina to redraw the map of a 194-acre natural oyster bar in Selby Bay so that it would not be shown as too close to the marina's planned expansion.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
- With oysters showing signs of revival in the Chesapeake Bay, some are trying to bring the bivalves back in the bay's second largest tributary, the Potomac River. Just two years into their fledgling effort to restore the river's once-bountiful oyster population, however, organizers are raising alarms about a large marina proposed in Charles County near the Potomac's largest and formerly most productive oyster bar. The 143-slip marina would provide berths for residents and guests of a 900-acre resort community planned on the waterfront here.
FEATURES
By JANICE BAKER | February 16, 1992
Remember Something Fishy -- a couple of blocks up from the harbor, and west of Broadway Market in Fells Point? When it closed, Something Fishy's building stood dark for nine months. Then Foster's Oyster Bar, Restaurant and Market turned the lights and the heat back on, and put a fire in the fireplace and pans back on the stoves. The oyster bar and restaurant have been in business since November. Foster's fish market opened last February.Both the bar and restaurant are pleasant, clean, attractive and imbued with the spirit of Fells Point.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
Southwestern-themed bar Dark Horse Saloon and Irish Pub Finnegan's Wake, the improbably conjoined bars at the former Canton Arts & Entertainment complex, have switched owners. The pub is poised to close afterSt. Patrick's Day, says Marc McFaul, who after nine months at the helm sold the business to Kenny Der, a regular DJ at Dark Horse. Finnegan's is likely to be turned into an extension of the Southwestern theme at Dark Horse next door. The switch gives McFaul's tenure the sprawling complex's second-longest run. It lasted a little over five months as Canton Arts and Entertainment , which at one point included a bar, an oyster bar and a restaurant.  CAE opened in September 2009 and closed the next March.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
Ryleigh's Oyster has expanded, and for that Baltimore County should be thankful. Ryleigh's is a big name in Federal Hill, where it stands out as a slightly more sophisticated dining and drinking option in a sea of crazy bars more focused on volume than quality. In early November, Ryleigh's owners opened a second location, dubbed Ryleigh's Oyster Hunt Valley (though it's technically in Timonium, in the Padonia Road location locals call "that place that used to be Gibby's"). So how does this downtown restaurant translate in the county?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
Southwestern-themed bar Dark Horse Saloon and Irish Pub Finnegan's Wake, the improbably conjoined bars at the former Canton Arts & Entertainment complex, have switched owners. The pub is poised to close afterSt. Patrick's Day, says Marc McFaul, who after nine months at the helm sold the business to Kenny Der, a regular DJ at Dark Horse. Finnegan's is likely to be turned into an extension of the Southwestern theme at Dark Horse next door. The switch gives McFaul's tenure the sprawling complex's second-longest run. It lasted a little over five months as Canton Arts and Entertainment , which at one point included a bar, an oyster bar and a restaurant.  CAE opened in September 2009 and closed the next March.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2011
For sheer handsomeness, Ryleigh's is hard to beat. This was the old Sisson's, which plain-old Ryleigh's took over, and for a few years languished in, before closing down and reopening in 2007 as a Ryleigh's Oyster Bar. The best view of Ryleigh's is from the sidewalk on Cross Street, from where arched floor-to-ceiling windows create an alluring continuous space between outside and in. Ryleigh's still has the good bones of a commercial market-side building,...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2011
Christopher "Guido" Whitesel, a bartender who worked at esatablishments in Annapolis and Baltimore, died March 27 of cancer at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis. He was 55. Mr. Whitesel was born in Washington and raised in Silver Spring, where he graduated in 1973 from John F. Kennedy High School. He attended Montgomery Community College before becoming a bartender in the 1970s. Mr. Whitesel was working at a gangster-themed bar in Rockville when a customer christened him with a nickname that stuck for the rest of his life.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
— For watermen who require safe passage to Chesapeake Bay oyster bars and fishing grounds each winter, the appearance of one of the state's four ice-breaking ships means money in the bank. Like giant plows on an asphalt road, icebreakers have been carving channels from piers to open waters, clearing away dangerous sheets of ice that can idle the commercial fleet, or worse, punch through the hull of a fishing boat. "Any ice at all is a real hazard for them," Capt. Shawn Orr said Tuesday morning as he guided the 80-foot M/V Sandusky through a row of watermen's boats tied up at Kent Narrows.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | July 13, 2009
In less than 20 feet of water, just north of where tankers and cruise ships make their slow turns from the Chesapeake Bay into the Patapsco River, lies the third rail of Maryland fishing. An oyster bar made up of millions of bushels of fossil shell sits on the bay bottom - the largest single deposit left in Maryland's portion of the bay. The state wants to restart its languishing oyster restoration program by digging up as much as 30 percent of the bar - known as Man-O-War Shoal - to serve as a foundation for a $30 million program.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2011
Christopher "Guido" Whitesel, a bartender who worked at esatablishments in Annapolis and Baltimore, died March 27 of cancer at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis. He was 55. Mr. Whitesel was born in Washington and raised in Silver Spring, where he graduated in 1973 from John F. Kennedy High School. He attended Montgomery Community College before becoming a bartender in the 1970s. Mr. Whitesel was working at a gangster-themed bar in Rockville when a customer christened him with a nickname that stuck for the rest of his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2011
For sheer handsomeness, Ryleigh's is hard to beat. This was the old Sisson's, which plain-old Ryleigh's took over, and for a few years languished in, before closing down and reopening in 2007 as a Ryleigh's Oyster Bar. The best view of Ryleigh's is from the sidewalk on Cross Street, from where arched floor-to-ceiling windows create an alluring continuous space between outside and in. Ryleigh's still has the good bones of a commercial market-side building,...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 9, 2009
John E. Larkin Jr., a seafood dealer whose raw oyster bar became a popular downtown gathering place, died of cardiac arrest Sunday at St. Agnes Hospital. The Catonsville resident was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, he attended Leonard Hall Junior Naval Academy and was a 1955 Mount St. Joseph High School graduate. Family members said that he remained close to his teachers, members of the Xaverian Brothers, throughout his life. He entered the seafood business as a young man. Multiple generations of Larkins had worked in the Baltimore seafood industry and owned stalls at Lexington, Hollins and Belair markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2008
Tearing out the beer-making equipment and adding a slate-topped raw bar has been the second-best change at Ryleigh's. The best change was installing Patrick Morrow as executive chef. In December 2006, Ryleigh's Brew Pub became Ryleigh's Oyster Bar. What an improvement. The indifferent food has been replaced with an inventive menu that changes every week but might include a salad with duck confit and goat cheese ($10) or coriander-crusted tuna ($16) served with tomatillo salsa and mashed purple potatoes.
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