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By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1999
SUITLAND -- Twelve families were chased from their homes in a garden apartment complex yesterday when a fire touched off two explosions that destroyed at least half of one building. Three children thought to be lost in the rubble were discovered in neighboring apartments in Carriage Hills, a 192-unit complex off Branch Avenue, outside the District of Columbia line. Seven people were injured -- two firefighters and two police officers, two men who jumped from balconies and a woman who was overcome by smoke.
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NEWS
February 24, 2007
Gas main break closes section of Belair Road A gas main break in the Fullerton area of Baltimore County closed about four blocks of Belair Road yesterday, police said. A contractor working in the area struck a gas main in the 8400 block of Belair Road about 1 p.m., BGE officials said. Authorities were forced to close both lanes of Belair Road from Dunfield Road to Ridgelys Choice Drive as BGE crews fixed the main, county police said. No one was evacuated and no injuries occurred, officials said.
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NEWS
By FAYE FIORE AND NICK TIMIRAOS and FAYE FIORE AND NICK TIMIRAOS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- When Rep. Charlie Norwood was diagnosed with a chronic lung disease a few years back, he followed the orders of his wife, Gloria, and gave up red meat, chewing tobacco and his favorite cigars. But that didn't save the Georgia Republican - recently recovered from a lung transplant and hooked up to an oxygen tank - from landing in a shroud of cigarette smoke recently as he parked his scooter chair in the Speaker's Lobby outside the House floor. Norwood doesn't smoke anymore, but several of his congressional colleagues do, defiantly and unapologetically, making Congress one of the few indoor workplaces - and possibly the most famous - in the country where it's still legal to light up. The Council of the District of Columbia passed a law that will make indoor workplaces, bars and restaurants smoke-free by next January.
NEWS
By FAYE FIORE AND NICK TIMIRAOS and FAYE FIORE AND NICK TIMIRAOS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- When Rep. Charlie Norwood was diagnosed with a chronic lung disease a few years back, he followed the orders of his wife, Gloria, and gave up red meat, chewing tobacco and his favorite cigars. But that didn't save the Georgia Republican - recently recovered from a lung transplant and hooked up to an oxygen tank - from landing in a shroud of cigarette smoke recently as he parked his scooter chair in the Speaker's Lobby outside the House floor. Norwood doesn't smoke anymore, but several of his congressional colleagues do, defiantly and unapologetically, making Congress one of the few indoor workplaces - and possibly the most famous - in the country where it's still legal to light up. The Council of the District of Columbia passed a law that will make indoor workplaces, bars and restaurants smoke-free by next January.
NEWS
June 12, 2002
Man, 41, charged in death of wife, who was hit by van A Curtis Bay man was charged with negligent homicide yesterday after hitting his wife with a minivan in the parking lot of a Brooklyn Park church, police said. Charles Linwood Page, 41, of the 800 block of Glade Court was charged with negligent homicide by motor vehicle while intoxicated, police said. The victim was identified yesterday as Valerie Ann Page, 38. Police said Charles Page ran to a nearby store and asked the clerk to call 911 because a woman had been injured.
NEWS
February 24, 2007
Gas main break closes section of Belair Road A gas main break in the Fullerton area of Baltimore County closed about four blocks of Belair Road yesterday, police said. A contractor working in the area struck a gas main in the 8400 block of Belair Road about 1 p.m., BGE officials said. Authorities were forced to close both lanes of Belair Road from Dunfield Road to Ridgelys Choice Drive as BGE crews fixed the main, county police said. No one was evacuated and no injuries occurred, officials said.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | December 12, 1994
A cigarette and an oxygen tank formed a fiery combination that killed a bedridden multiple sclerosis patient early yesterday in Owings Mills, authorities said.Ralph Lee Harveson, 44, had suffered from the degenerative nerve disease for at least eight years and was virtually paraplegic, but he refused to surrender his independence and move into a group home, his brother, Carlton "Harvey" Harveson, said yesterday. And although he relied on bottled oxygen, Ralph Harveson ignored pleas from friends and relatives that he give up cigarettes.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
A 69-year-old Arnold woman died yesterday after losing control of her car on College Parkway and slamming into a school bus on its way to pick up children at a nearby elementary school, authorities said.Police said the car's driver, Veda Shoup of the 500 block of Oakmont Court, was conscious and talking after the accident, then went into cardiac arrest. She was pronounced dead at Anne Arundel Medical Center.The bus driver, 51-year-old Daniel Bledsole of Severna Park, was in fair condition last night at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | June 26, 1991
Two short months free from an oxygen tank were enough time to complete what Charles W. "Bud" Groft Jr. wanted to do.Family members say the 51-year-old Manchester resident never regretted the double-lungtransplant he received in August that indirectly took his life Saturday.Groft had developed stomach ulcers from the medication he took tofight organ rejection and died from an infection after ulcer surgeryat Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.However, the avid outdoorsman was able to drive to visit friends, take his grandsons hunting and enjoy time with his horse Echo between the time he regained his strength from the transplant and became ill again in February.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2001
On Christmas morning, Albert Rudman woke up, wrapped himself in a red Izod cardigan that barely stretched over his oxygen tank, and drove to the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Baltimore to begin rounds. The 81-year-old Jewish grandfather was just getting started when he handed Hayes Moore a tote bag stuffed with a sweat shirt, hygiene kit, baseball cap and crossword puzzle book. Moore smiled. "I love crossword puzzle books. That's how I learned most of my vocabulary." Then he added: "I can use everything in here.
FEATURES
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2004
Before 13-year-old Mattie Stepanek became famous, before his poetry hit the New York Times best-seller list, before he met Oprah Winfrey and former president Jimmy Carter, the precocious boy with a rare neuromuscular disease knew he was dying. It was a terrible knowledge, coming from having seen his sister and two brothers die of the disease, but it gave young Mattie a sense of urgency. As he told the Make-A-Wish Foundation three years ago, when the bleeding in his trachea wouldn't stop, he had three goals: To meet Carter.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - A planned spacewalk ended just minutes after it began last night because of a problem with the oxygen supply to astronaut Mike Fincke's spacesuit. Four minutes after Fincke exited the International Space Station - Russian Gennady Padalka was still inside the airlock - controllers on the ground noticed that the pressure in Fincke's oxygen bottle was falling faster than expected. Controllers told Fincke to go back inside, and although the pair spent more than an hour trying to solve the problem, Russian and NASA officials decided to abort the spacewalk to fix a circuit breaker shortly after 7 p.m. EDT. Neither astronaut was ever in any danger, and officials said they expect to try the spacewalk again, no earlier than Tuesday.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2002
Exploding oxygen tanks fueled a four-alarm fire at a Crofton office building yesterday afternoon that sent employees fleeing and caused an estimated $2 million in damage. No one was injured in the blaze, which began in a medical supply office and took 85 firefighters about an hour and a half to bring under control, fire officials said. "After a few pops, a huge puff of black smoke filled the air," said Charles Mitchell, who was eating lunch at a nearby restaurant when the fire began. "It seemed like the building caught on fire immediately."
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2002
Draft day can turn depressing for NFL prospects with inflated opinions of themselves. Because he had experience being unappreciated, however, Will Demps did not get down in the dumps when all seven rounds passed without mention of his name in April. Demps is the rookie free agent who's identifiable by the bulky padding around his right arm - in the locker room he answers to "Robocop" or "The Michelin Man" - and the impact he made in his first two pro games. The Ravens started 0-2 when he was out with a dislocated elbow.
NEWS
June 12, 2002
Man, 41, charged in death of wife, who was hit by van A Curtis Bay man was charged with negligent homicide yesterday after hitting his wife with a minivan in the parking lot of a Brooklyn Park church, police said. Charles Linwood Page, 41, of the 800 block of Glade Court was charged with negligent homicide by motor vehicle while intoxicated, police said. The victim was identified yesterday as Valerie Ann Page, 38. Police said Charles Page ran to a nearby store and asked the clerk to call 911 because a woman had been injured.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2001
On Christmas morning, Albert Rudman woke up, wrapped himself in a red Izod cardigan that barely stretched over his oxygen tank, and drove to the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Baltimore to begin rounds. The 81-year-old Jewish grandfather was just getting started when he handed Hayes Moore a tote bag stuffed with a sweat shirt, hygiene kit, baseball cap and crossword puzzle book. Moore smiled. "I love crossword puzzle books. That's how I learned most of my vocabulary." Then he added: "I can use everything in here.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
On this holiday, when many people take a deep breath and count their blessings, Zach Chamberlin considers himself lucky just to breathe. For the first Thanksgiving Day in his life, the 18-year-old Glen Burnie resident doesn't need a ventilator, or an oxygen tank, or a breathing tube to help him stay alive. Last November, doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital performed a successful double lung transplant that saved his life. Now, the chest, shoulder and neck contortions he had done all his life to draw a simple breath are no longer necessary.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2002
Draft day can turn depressing for NFL prospects with inflated opinions of themselves. Because he had experience being unappreciated, however, Will Demps did not get down in the dumps when all seven rounds passed without mention of his name in April. Demps is the rookie free agent who's identifiable by the bulky padding around his right arm - in the locker room he answers to "Robocop" or "The Michelin Man" - and the impact he made in his first two pro games. The Ravens started 0-2 when he was out with a dislocated elbow.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
On this holiday, when many people take a deep breath and count their blessings, Zach Chamberlin considers himself lucky just to breathe. For the first Thanksgiving Day in his life, the 18-year-old Glen Burnie resident doesn't need a ventilator, or an oxygen tank, or a breathing tube to help him stay alive. Last November, doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital performed a successful double lung transplant that saved his life. Now, the chest, shoulder and neck contortions he had done all his life to draw a simple breath are no longer necessary.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1999
SUITLAND -- Twelve families were chased from their homes in a garden apartment complex yesterday when a fire touched off two explosions that destroyed at least half of one building. Three children thought to be lost in the rubble were discovered in neighboring apartments in Carriage Hills, a 192-unit complex off Branch Avenue, outside the District of Columbia line. Seven people were injured -- two firefighters and two police officers, two men who jumped from balconies and a woman who was overcome by smoke.
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