Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOxx
IN THE NEWS

Oxx

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1997
The new director of the Carroll County Arts Council will finish her first week on the job handling one of the organization's major annual events.Sandra M. Oxx, 37, found out Friday that she will replace Hilary Hatfield, who resigned in March to become business manager for a local sculptor.Oxx plunged right in yesterday, making last-minute arrangements for "Art in the Park," an event that usually takes months to plan."I might as well start with a big event," she said.About 50 artists will exhibit their works from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, drawing thousands of visitors to the grounds of Westminster City Hall.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Sun Reporter | July 8, 2007
Wanted: 263 people of all ages to fill a theater for a family movie and buy popcorn and soda - cheap. Next movie is Fly Away Home at 1 p.m. Thursday at Carroll Arts Center, 91 W. Main St., Westminster. Tickets $4 for adults and $3 for members, senior citizens and students under 18. Concessions, $2 each. Cash, credit card, checks welcome. 410-848-7272. Filling the Carroll County Arts Council's big-screen theater whenever a movie is shown is one of Sandy Oxx's goals to help recoup a $17,500 funding loss from the city of Westminster in this fiscal year.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2001
When terrorists attacked the World Trade Center in New York on Sept. 11, one of the many organizations that lost its offices was the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. Though its staff survived, the organization's headquarters, at 5 World Trade Center, was destroyed. Organizers of the annual Carroll County Arts Council's Festival of Wreaths want to help the Lower Manhattan council get back on its feet. The Carroll group will donate part of the proceeds from this year's fund-raiser to help New Yorkers.
NEWS
By KATIE MARTIN and KATIE MARTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2006
When Sandy Oxx joined the Carroll County Arts Council nearly a decade ago, the organization was hidden away in the basement of the Winchester Exchange Building in downtown Westminster. Besides not being easily accessible to the community, the one-room space also had to serve as a gallery, as well as a center for a multitude of other functions. "Summer camp took place on the floor of the gallery, and my desk was in the back corner," Oxx said. For years, the council looked for a new home for the organization and eventually found it - the old Carroll Theatre.
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2001
When terrorists attacked the World Trade Center in New York on Sept. 11, one of the many organizations that lost its offices was the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. Though its staff survived, the organization's headquarters, at 5 World Trade Center, was destroyed. Organizers of the annual Carroll County Arts Council's Festival of Wreaths want to help the Lower Manhattan council get back on its feet. The Carroll group will donate part of the proceeds from this year's fund-raiser to help New Yorkers.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1997
There won't be a world premiere in Maryland, but the Carroll County Arts Council is planning its own party for next month's opening of "For Richer or Poorer."Filmed last spring in and around Westminster, the Tim Allen-Kirstie Alley comedy opens Dec. 4 in Los Angeles and hits theaters nationally Dec. 12, said Andrea Thomas, communications manager for the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development, which includes the Maryland Film Office."No, there is not going to be a Maryland premiere here," Thomas said, after consultations with Universal Studios Inc.So Sandy Oxx, executive director of the county arts council, is putting together a benefit party to make a night of it, featuring a couple of local extras "to be our glittering stars," and perhaps an auction of memorabilia from the film.
NEWS
By KATIE MARTIN and KATIE MARTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2006
When Sandy Oxx joined the Carroll County Arts Council nearly a decade ago, the organization was hidden away in the basement of the Winchester Exchange Building in downtown Westminster. Besides not being easily accessible to the community, the one-room space also had to serve as a gallery, as well as a center for a multitude of other functions. "Summer camp took place on the floor of the gallery, and my desk was in the back corner," Oxx said. For years, the council looked for a new home for the organization and eventually found it - the old Carroll Theatre.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
Anyone walking down Westminster's Main Street can see signs that the old Carroll Theatre is being restored. The faM-gade, in recent years flat and nondescript, includes a three-sided marquee that is a nod to the theater's heyday. Less visible is the work inside, where a performing arts center with galleries, a stage and classrooms is taking shape. A key piece of the project was completed this week: 263 seats were installed in a theater that will feature plays, dances, musical performances - and movies.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 6, 1998
Children who want to take music lessons but whose parents can't afford instruments will get the chance, thanks to a grant program administered by the Carroll County Arts Council.The United Way of Central Maryland awarded the council a $2,000 grant to create a musical instrument bank that would loan instruments to children.The focus of the loans would be elementary to middle school children who have an interest in music, but whose parents cannot afford to rent or buy instruments, said Sandy Oxx, Arts Council executive director.
NEWS
December 18, 1997
A benefit screening of the locally filmed movie "For Richer or Poorer" raised more than $2,000 for the children's scholarship program of Carroll County Arts CouncilThe council bought out the early evening show when the film opened at Cranberry Mall last week , said Sandra M. Oxx, the arts council executive director. The theater added a second screen to meet the local demand for tickets."They could have sold out 50 times over," Oxx said of the evening showing. "It was filled with people who wanted to see it -- and they hadn't even advertised for that time."
NEWS
By Katie Martin and Katie Martin,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2004
When Alfred Hitchcock's most famous thrillers were originally released in the 1950s and 1960s, an audience would have watched the suspense unfold at the Carroll Theatre on Main Street in Westminster. This month, classic Hitchcock films will again be shown at the theater, now the renovated Carroll Arts Center, as part of an Alfred Hitchcock Film Festival. "The series brings back an era of when this theater was hoppin'," said Sandy Oxx, executive director of the Carroll County Arts Council.
NEWS
By Katie Martin and Katie Martin,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2004
When Alfred Hitchcock's most famous thrillers were originally released in the 1950s and 1960s, an audience would have watched the suspense unfold at the Carroll Theatre on Main Street in Westminster. This month, classic Hitchcock films will again be shown at the theater, now the renovated Carroll Arts Center, as part of an Alfred Hitchcock Film Festival. "The series brings back an era of when this theater was hoppin'," said Sandy Oxx, executive director of the Carroll County Arts Council.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2003
Magnificent white and gold magnolia petals adorn one wreath. Snowmen smile from another. A penguin, looking like he's been to the orthodontist, rides a tiny sled in a third. At the Carroll County Arts Council's sixth annual Festival of Wreaths, which opens tomorrow, the familiar images of Christmas compete for attention with the whimsical and the outlandish. "There really is something here for everybody," said Sandy Oxx, arts council director. "There is the gorgeous, the quirky and wreaths you can hang all year round."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2003
Magnificent white and gold magnolia petals adorn one wreath. Snowmen smile from another. A penguin, looking like he's been to the orthodontist, rides a tiny sled in a third. At the Carroll County Arts Council's sixth annual Festival of Wreaths, which opens tomorrow, the familiar images of Christmas compete for attention with the whimsical and the outlandish. "There really is something here for everybody," said Sandy Oxx, arts council director. "There is the gorgeous, the quirky and wreaths you can hang all year round."
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2003
A spotlight played over the gleaming gray casket on stage at the 1930s art deco theater in Westminster, as one-time magician Scott Albin stepped to the microphone to address the coffin's occupant. "Compeer Ray-Mond, when you were initiated into the Society of American Magicians, you were presented with a wand, ancient emblem of mystery," Albin intoned as 14 fellow magicians formed a horseshoe around the coffin. "It symbolized the magic power that was yours as you used your knowledge of magic's secrets.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
Anyone walking down Westminster's Main Street can see signs that the old Carroll Theatre is being restored. The faM-gade, in recent years flat and nondescript, includes a three-sided marquee that is a nod to the theater's heyday. Less visible is the work inside, where a performing arts center with galleries, a stage and classrooms is taking shape. A key piece of the project was completed this week: 263 seats were installed in a theater that will feature plays, dances, musical performances - and movies.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Sun Reporter | July 8, 2007
Wanted: 263 people of all ages to fill a theater for a family movie and buy popcorn and soda - cheap. Next movie is Fly Away Home at 1 p.m. Thursday at Carroll Arts Center, 91 W. Main St., Westminster. Tickets $4 for adults and $3 for members, senior citizens and students under 18. Concessions, $2 each. Cash, credit card, checks welcome. 410-848-7272. Filling the Carroll County Arts Council's big-screen theater whenever a movie is shown is one of Sandy Oxx's goals to help recoup a $17,500 funding loss from the city of Westminster in this fiscal year.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.