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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Your Midweek Madness supplier confesses ignorance of Shakira. Please forgive. The first awareness of this global sensation came a couple days ago with the accidental discovery of a cover made of one of Shakira's mega-hits, "Hips Don't Lie," sung by an a cappella ensemble of Oxford University students called Out of the Blue. (They've been raising money to support a children's hospice with downloads of the performance .) The infectious Out of the Blue video has gone viral, needless to say, so it is posted here only for the benefit of those few who remain pitifully unaware of Shakira's "Hips Don't Lie" or a bunch of "Glee"-worthy, wiggling warblers from a posh British school.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Your Midweek Madness supplier confesses ignorance of Shakira. Please forgive. The first awareness of this global sensation came a couple days ago with the accidental discovery of a cover made of one of Shakira's mega-hits, "Hips Don't Lie," sung by an a cappella ensemble of Oxford University students called Out of the Blue. (They've been raising money to support a children's hospice with downloads of the performance .) The infectious Out of the Blue video has gone viral, needless to say, so it is posted here only for the benefit of those few who remain pitifully unaware of Shakira's "Hips Don't Lie" or a bunch of "Glee"-worthy, wiggling warblers from a posh British school.
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NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | November 20, 2006
Two college students with ties to Maryland were among 32 Americans selected to be 2007 Rhodes scholars, it was announced yesterday. They are Casey N. Cep, a senior at Harvard University who grew up on Maryland's Eastern Shore, and Sean A. Genis, a senior at the U.S. Naval Academy who is from Pennsylvania. Winning the scholarship means both students will spend two or three years studying at Oxford University in England starting in October. Cep and Genis were selected from among 896 applicants at 340 colleges and universities in the United States.
NEWS
By Jonathan David Farley | July 22, 2014
I was on my way to a meeting on the campus of the University of California at Berkeley years ago when a man hawking the socialist Workers Vanguard newspaper stopped me. The headline screamed, "Open Admissions!" In other words, the prestigious University of California at Berkeley should let anybody in. I tried to reason with the man selling the newspaper - I know, I was young and naive - that, even in the Soviet Union, universities did not have open admissions policies. The elite schools were for the best students; most people probably could not go to university at all. The man denounced me as an enemy of the worker, so I turned around and proceeded to the meeting.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
Dr. Kris H. Jenner was so exhausted that squeezing his 6-foot-5-inch frame onto a small bed in a converted closet didn't even bother him. Sleep came fast and deep. Suddenly, he sprang up. After agonizing for months, finally, in February 1997, he had made up his mind: Jenner would trade in his scrubs and stethoscope for a pin-stripped suit and Hewlett-Packard 12C calculator. He was going to become a money manager. The decision stunned friends and colleagues alike. After all, it meant sacrificing 13 years of medical and scientific training at some of the most prestigious universities - Oxford University in England, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School - and abandoning a promising career as a general surgeon.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
One of my recent posts on the unreliability of Wikipedia caught the eye of Edward Buckner, a medievalist, who shared with me a paper he has written about deficiencies in an Oxford University study of the reliability of Wikipedia. You may be aware of a study in 2005 by the journal Nature that found Wikipedia to be, on the whole, about as accurate as the Encyclopedia Britannica . This study is what I take to be the frequently repeated claim by Wikipediasts that the two references are equally reliable, even though Britannica challenged the validity of the study.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2011
The Rev. James Ashton Devereux, a Jesuit priest who served as provincial of Maryland Province, died of Parkinson's disease Dec. 19 at Manresa Hall in Merion Station, Pa. He was 83. Born in Philadelphia, he was a 1945 graduate of St. Joseph's Preparatory School and entered the Society of Jesus the same year. Father Devereux earned his bachelor's degree in 1951 and master's in 1954, both from the old Woodstock College in Baltimore County. He also received a licentiate in sacred theology at St. Albert de Louvain in Belgium and had a doctorate in English from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | November 18, 2007
What Hath God Wrought The Transformation of America, 1815-1848 By Daniel Walker Howe Oxford University Press / 904 pages / $35 The United States, Ralph Waldo Emerson announced in 1844, was "the country of the Future." Marked by political liberty, economic enterprise and the diffusion of information, America was a "nation of beginnings, of projects, of vast designs and expectations." Daniel Walker Howe agrees. Between the War of 1812 and the Mexican War, he reminds us in What Hath God Wrought, America doubled in size, extending to the Pacific Ocean.
FEATURES
By JIM CASTELLI | December 23, 1990
The Oxford Illustrated History of Christianity.Edited by John McManners.Oxford University.724 pages. $39.95; $45 after Jan. 1.Oxford University Press describes its illustrated history of Christianity as "the most authoritative general history of Christianity ever published." It says, "The story of Christianity -- from its origins to the present day -- has never been so magnificently or comprehensively told."Award-winning historian John McManners edited the volume, which is organized as a series of essaylike chapters written by a variety of scholars, most from Oxford.
NEWS
By Jonathan David Farley | July 22, 2014
I was on my way to a meeting on the campus of the University of California at Berkeley years ago when a man hawking the socialist Workers Vanguard newspaper stopped me. The headline screamed, "Open Admissions!" In other words, the prestigious University of California at Berkeley should let anybody in. I tried to reason with the man selling the newspaper - I know, I was young and naive - that, even in the Soviet Union, universities did not have open admissions policies. The elite schools were for the best students; most people probably could not go to university at all. The man denounced me as an enemy of the worker, so I turned around and proceeded to the meeting.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Perhaps before we publish, or read, any more inane articles about lexicography, we might take a moment to reflect on what dictionaries are for .  One of the latest misguided (read: stupid) articles on the subject is by Michael Dirda in The Washington Post :  "Oxford Dictionaries adds' twerk,; 'FOMO,' 'selfie,' and other words that make me vom. "  As the headline indicates, Oxford University press has gathered up a number of slang terms for the quarterly update of the Oxford Dictionaries Online*, and Mr. Dirda is not pleased with them.  Before we get to the lexicography, we might ask why Mr. Dirda thought we would be interested in his personal preferences in vocabulary.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Paul T. Walker Sr., a partner in the Washington law firm of Walker & Walker Associates who was moved to become a lawyer because of the civil rights movement of the 1960s, died July 25 of sarcoidosis at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 70. "Throughout his life, Paul was always a seeker who always tried to better himself. That was his motivation. To be the best that he could," said his wife of 48 years and law partner, the former Betty Stevens. "He was also a humble man who loved humility in others and before God. " The son of a disabled Army veteran and a hospital cook, Paul Thomas Walker Sr. was born and raised in Chattanooga, Tenn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2013
Taiye Selasi's debut novel has been in publication for less than a week. But even before a single copy was sold, the glamorous 33-year-old was being hailed as the newest star of the literary world. Selasi's publisher, The Penguin Group, is promoting "Ghana Must Go" big-time. Penguin describes the family saga as "one of the most eagerly anticipated debut novels of the year. " Because of her book's multicultural tapestry, Selasi has been compared to such literary It Girls as Zadie Smith and Jhumpa Lahiri.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
One of my recent posts on the unreliability of Wikipedia caught the eye of Edward Buckner, a medievalist, who shared with me a paper he has written about deficiencies in an Oxford University study of the reliability of Wikipedia. You may be aware of a study in 2005 by the journal Nature that found Wikipedia to be, on the whole, about as accurate as the Encyclopedia Britannica . This study is what I take to be the frequently repeated claim by Wikipediasts that the two references are equally reliable, even though Britannica challenged the validity of the study.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2011
The Rev. James Ashton Devereux, a Jesuit priest who served as provincial of Maryland Province, died of Parkinson's disease Dec. 19 at Manresa Hall in Merion Station, Pa. He was 83. Born in Philadelphia, he was a 1945 graduate of St. Joseph's Preparatory School and entered the Society of Jesus the same year. Father Devereux earned his bachelor's degree in 1951 and master's in 1954, both from the old Woodstock College in Baltimore County. He also received a licentiate in sacred theology at St. Albert de Louvain in Belgium and had a doctorate in English from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | November 18, 2007
What Hath God Wrought The Transformation of America, 1815-1848 By Daniel Walker Howe Oxford University Press / 904 pages / $35 The United States, Ralph Waldo Emerson announced in 1844, was "the country of the Future." Marked by political liberty, economic enterprise and the diffusion of information, America was a "nation of beginnings, of projects, of vast designs and expectations." Daniel Walker Howe agrees. Between the War of 1812 and the Mexican War, he reminds us in What Hath God Wrought, America doubled in size, extending to the Pacific Ocean.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Perhaps before we publish, or read, any more inane articles about lexicography, we might take a moment to reflect on what dictionaries are for .  One of the latest misguided (read: stupid) articles on the subject is by Michael Dirda in The Washington Post :  "Oxford Dictionaries adds' twerk,; 'FOMO,' 'selfie,' and other words that make me vom. "  As the headline indicates, Oxford University press has gathered up a number of slang terms for the quarterly update of the Oxford Dictionaries Online*, and Mr. Dirda is not pleased with them.  Before we get to the lexicography, we might ask why Mr. Dirda thought we would be interested in his personal preferences in vocabulary.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Paul T. Walker Sr., a partner in the Washington law firm of Walker & Walker Associates who was moved to become a lawyer because of the civil rights movement of the 1960s, died July 25 of sarcoidosis at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 70. "Throughout his life, Paul was always a seeker who always tried to better himself. That was his motivation. To be the best that he could," said his wife of 48 years and law partner, the former Betty Stevens. "He was also a humble man who loved humility in others and before God. " The son of a disabled Army veteran and a hospital cook, Paul Thomas Walker Sr. was born and raised in Chattanooga, Tenn.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | November 20, 2006
Two college students with ties to Maryland were among 32 Americans selected to be 2007 Rhodes scholars, it was announced yesterday. They are Casey N. Cep, a senior at Harvard University who grew up on Maryland's Eastern Shore, and Sean A. Genis, a senior at the U.S. Naval Academy who is from Pennsylvania. Winning the scholarship means both students will spend two or three years studying at Oxford University in England starting in October. Cep and Genis were selected from among 896 applicants at 340 colleges and universities in the United States.
TRAVEL
By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 15, 2001
Cue the college choir. Roll the "Brideshead Revisited" footage. Lay out the strawberries and clotted cream. We're in Oxford, England. The morning sun through the high stained-glass windows of the dining hall; the undistinguished food on the table; the expertise and eccentricity of one's classmates; the time-honored squalor of the dormitories; the history underfoot and overhead. Those Oxford days were great days -- all seven of them. My wife, Mary Frances, and I came here last summer, stayed a week and then scooted, unburdened by diplomas or aristocratic connections.
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