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SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | August 19, 1993
It happens every August.The tiny Eastern Shore town of Oxford experiences a temporary population explosion, as hundreds of sailors converge on the Tred Avon Yacht Club for the Oxford regatta -- a three-day affair for boats of virtually every size and description and for sailors of any age.More than 115 handicap and cruising one-design boats took off from Annapolis Friday for the 29-mile sail down the Chesapeake and up the Choptank and Tred Avon rivers to...
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Years ago, before heading to campus to sit in a library carrel and pretend to scholarship, I would listen to Hughes Rudd's dry commentaries on the CBS morning news program.  So when I saw in a bookstore a copy of his My Escape from the CIA (and into CBS) , it was irresistible. Here are the three opening paragraphs of "The Death of William Faulkner," which he published in the Saturday Evening Post  in 1963: He had been in pain for several weeks, wearing a brace to support the injured back, and people around the square said maybe that was why he started drinking again.
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SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | September 30, 1992
Tropical Storm Danielle cleared out of the area just in time t make Saturday a nearly perfect day for sailing.More than 200 teams of racers started the Naval Academy Sailing Squadron's annual 29-mile Oxford Race down the bay from Annapolis, up into the Choptank and on into the Tred Avon River.The race, informally known as the Fall Oxford when paired with the following day's 20.5-mile reciprocal Tred Avon Yacht Club Hammond Memorial Race from Oxford to Poplar Island, is one of the last big weekend events of the sailing season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Your Midweek Madness supplier confesses ignorance of Shakira. Please forgive. The first awareness of this global sensation came a couple days ago with the accidental discovery of a cover made of one of Shakira's mega-hits, "Hips Don't Lie," sung by an a cappella ensemble of Oxford University students called Out of the Blue. (They've been raising money to support a children's hospice with downloads of the performance .) The infectious Out of the Blue video has gone viral, needless to say, so it is posted here only for the benefit of those few who remain pitifully unaware of Shakira's "Hips Don't Lie" or a bunch of "Glee"-worthy, wiggling warblers from a posh British school.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2003
Douglas Hanks Jr., a retired Oxford real estate broker, author, sailor and carver whose interest in the history and people of the Talbot County community resulted in several books, died of cancer Saturday at his home there. He was 60. Mr. Hanks was born in Cambridge and briefly lived in Seaford, Del., but resided nearly all of his life in the quaint waterfront community overlooking the confluence of the Tred Avon and Choptank rivers. "He's everything the Eastern Shore was and is all about.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | May 13, 1992
OXFORD, England -- It is hard to know if the young women of Somerville College are standing for the future or against it.But one thing is certain. These women know what they want. They want no men in Somerville.They have made their feelings clear to the governors of the college, who want to begin admitting men next year. The reasons for this decision are not known publicly. Catherine Hughes, the principal, declines to speak to the press.Unofficially it is said that a coed Somerville would draw the kind of students likely to lift its academic standing, which, according to one report, has been slipping.
SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | October 2, 1994
The back-to-back races between Annapolis and Oxford last weekend, the Naval Academy Sailing Squadron Race to Oxford on Saturday and the Tred Avon Yacht Club's Hammond Memorial Race from Oxford to Poplar Island known as "Fall Oxford," suffered a bit from lack of wind but certainly not from lack of fun.The NASS Race Committee, finding no morning wind on the bay and expecting a southerly sea breeze to come in later in the day, postponed the start at the mouth...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 1996
OXFORD, England -- What university would turn down a gift of $34 million for a new business school? Hardly any -- except, that is, Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world.The dons of Oxford, to which the bright and the well-born have flocked since the 12th century, recently said no to the money of Wafic Said, a Saudi billionaire of Syrian origin.The Daily Telegraph, a conservative paper, called the 259-to-214 vote Nov. 5 against the offer an elitist bias against business.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | June 9, 1994
OXFORD, England -- President Clinton, bare-headed, ruddy-faced and smiling above a scarlet robe, received an honorary doctorate yesterday from Oxford University to cap his weeklong tour of Europe."
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | March 7, 1994
OXFORD, England -- Gargoyles and grotesques glare, grimace and grin from the hallowed buildings of this old university town like a horde of uneasy spirits trapped forever in stone.Hundreds, even thousands, of these twisted faces and writhing figures punctuate the collegiate facades like footnotes to a long architectural thesis. They line the walls of Balliol and All Souls and Brasenose and Christ Church and Magdalen and New College -- weathering galleries of wild things and weird beasties.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | July 20, 2012
Congratulations to Mystery Loves Company, an independent bookstore that celebrated its 21st birthday this month.  Life is tough for any indy these days, and it's nice to see Kathy Harig's shop doing well in the quaint town of Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore. Baltimoreans may recall the days when MLC had a shop in Fells Point; it closed in late 2008. At the time, Harig said a number of factors played into her decision to close that store and focus on the Oxford location. Among them: the long commute from her home on the Eastern Shore, a slowing economy and difficulty in attracting authors to the city for signings.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
John Frederic Requardt Jr., a retired businessman who enjoyed sailing, died Feb. 10 of complications from a stroke at William Hill Manor in Easton. The one-time Trappe resident was 92. The son of a lawyer and a homemaker, Mr. Requardt was born in Baltimore. He was the grandson of Marie Oehl von Hattersheim Bauernschmidt, a well-known Baltimore political crusader for more than 40 years who died in 1962. Mr. Requardt attended Gilman School and graduated in 1939 from the Kent School in Kent, Conn.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | November 1, 2011
"Anonymous" is not shy about naming names. It contends that the 37 plays attributed to William Shakespeare, who died in 1616, actually were written by the Earl of Oxford, who died in 1604. As this story has it, the barely literate commoner Shakespeare fronted for the highly literate and politically well-connected nobleman Oxford. Consequently, such late Shakespeare plays as "The Tempest" reputedly would have been written many years earlier, stockpiled, and then eventually released under Shakespeare's name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
"The Other Wes Moore" is a book that bridges the gap between Inner Harbor and inner city in the most startling and revelatory ways. The title might suggest the tale of a hidden life. But it's something completely different: the story of two Baltimore men with the same name, roughly similar backgrounds — and wholly opposite journeys. The Wes Moore who was just on "Oprah" became a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the Johns Hopkins University, a Rhodes scholar, a White House Fellow and an Army officer in Afghanistan, as well as the author of this book.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Lorraine Mirabella | November 16, 2009
A developer is planning Howard County's third urban-style mixed-use development along the MARC rail commuter line near Elkridge, a site long expected to be used for a Coca-Cola bottling plant. The 122-acre project, called Oxford Square, would include up to 1,400 apartments and condominiums, 1 million square feet of commercial space, retail stores, a hotel and possibly six acres for a school, mimicking similar proposals at the Savage and Laurel Park train stations farther south. The transit station projects have all been promoted as examples of Smart Growth - absorbing new residences and commercial development in areas already served by mass transit, roads, utilities and schools.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 24, 2009
Christine D. Sarbanes, a retired educator, active board member and wife of former Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, died Sunday of cancer at her Guilford home. She was 73. "Her life and legacy as a teacher and community servant touched thousands of Marylanders and reminds us all that a life lived for others is the greatest of gifts," Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a statement Monday. "She believed in the dignity of every individual, and that every person has potential that we, as a community, can unlock through literacy and access to higher learning."
SPORTS
By Nancy Noyes and Nancy Noyes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 1995
There was a big turnout among Star sailors last weekend, when 25 teams from as far away as southern California, the Midwest and New England arrived at the Tred Avon Yacht Club in Oxford for the 45th annual Oxford Fall Windups regatta.Winning overall was Elliott Oldak of Annapolis and his crew Paul Amlong, with a 2-1 finish. They edged Bill Allen and Chuck Neville from Willamette, Ill., at 1-3.The fleet was somewhat larger than usual and contained more out-of-town boats, due to the Star North American Championships, which will be at West River Sailing Club in Galesville Oct. 23-29.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | October 29, 1994
OXFORD, England -- Kermit the Frog cracked the species barrier last night to become the first amphibian ever to speak in the hallowed and historic debating chamber of the Oxford Union Society.And there was no debate about it -- he wowed 'em.Kermit arrived to a thunderous welcome from the 900 students stuffed into the gothic hall and left to a standing ovation an hour later."It used to be that the only way a frog could get into a university was as an experiment in dissection," he told them, speaking from a rostrum where peers, prime minsters and presidents have debated world-shaking events.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | October 6, 2008
Eugenia M. "Jeanne" Kappler, a nurse-midwife who delivered many babies during nearly four decades in Maryland, died Tuesday of lung cancer at Brakeley Park Care Center in Phillipsburg, N.J. She was 83. Miss Kappler, a native of Oxford, N.J., was the youngest of seven children. She served in the Army Cadet Nursing Corps from 1943 to 1946 and graduated from St. Francis School of Nursing in Trenton, N.J., in 1946. A decade later, she received a nursing degree from Villanova University. Miss Kappler also studied to be a certified nurse-midwife at the Johns Hopkins University, graduating in 1958, and earned a master's degree from the University of Maryland in 1959, said her niece, Mary Alice Bockman.
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