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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 27, 1994
Q. How can you pay millions to a friendly and powerful legislator legally? A. Call yourself a publisher, him an author and it an advance.Baseball owners and players have given up the game in favor of sumo wrassling.
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NEWS
July 27, 2011
Once again, the loyal fans of a major sport (professional football) get played like a cheap fiddle. ("NFL lockout ends "July 26.) To exacerbate the situation, both sides talk about how they owe it to their fans to get back on the field. (What they really mean to say is that their greedy desires have been satiated by a contract that lines the pockets of both owners and players.) We have already been robbed of a tradition - preseason training at McDaniel College in Westminster.
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NEWS
July 27, 2011
Once again, the loyal fans of a major sport (professional football) get played like a cheap fiddle. ("NFL lockout ends "July 26.) To exacerbate the situation, both sides talk about how they owe it to their fans to get back on the field. (What they really mean to say is that their greedy desires have been satiated by a contract that lines the pockets of both owners and players.) We have already been robbed of a tradition - preseason training at McDaniel College in Westminster.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2011
When the clock strikes midnight and Thursday evening officially becomes Friday morning the world of professional football, and the multi-billion dollar economy it fuels, will almost certainly come to a grinding halt. Baring a last-minute miracle at the table — something neither side believes is likely — the current collective bargaining agreement between the NFL owners and the NFL Players Association will expire. The owners are expected to begin a lockout that will stop payment on players' salaries and bar them from showing up to work.
SPORTS
December 2, 1998
NBA games lost yesterday: 9.Total games missed: 203.Earliest estimated date that season can start: Jan. 1.Projected player salary losses (through Jan. 1): $330 million.Negotiations: Will resume tomorrow in New York with full committees representing owners and players.Today's best canceled game: Seattle at Philadelphia. Allen Iverson has met with limited success when matched up against Gary Payton, who has made the NBA's All-Defensive team every year since the 1993-94 season.Pub Date: 12/02/98
NEWS
November 29, 1996
YOU CAN'T blame fans for their skepticism about the long-overdue accord between baseball owners and players. So much has been lost during this dispute.Two strike-shortened seasons. A year without a World Series. Utter contempt for the public shown by both sides. Losses of $1 billion for owners, $400 million for players. Sagging attendance and TV ratings. Fans angrily turning away from the former national pastime.Salvaging a labor agreement at least prevents matters from getting worse for a few years.
NEWS
By Fay Vincent | April 5, 1995
NAPOLEON IS supposed to have sacked generals he said were unlucky.Perhaps baseball owners will explain what just happened to them as "bad luck" -- though of course none of them will be sacked.But bad luck cannot account for the absurd events of the past seven months since the players went on strike and the owners vowed to get a salary cap.Now, as "real" baseball returns, we have the acting commissioner expressing pleasure that his fellow owners accepted the players' "unconditional" offer to return to work.
NEWS
February 9, 1995
Barely a week from what should be the start of baseball's spring training, major league owners and players are no closer to settling their labor dispute than they were six months ago. When the president of the United States can't jawbone a settlement in a labor dispute with high public interest, a voluntary agreement is nowhere near in sight. And Mr. Clinton's call on Congress to impose binding arbitration holds little promise.Union leaders have long seemed to be relying on eventual federal action of one sort or another to break the deadlock with the owners.
NEWS
December 24, 1994
It's a new ballgame now, as they say. No matter how the confrontation between baseball owners and players eventually comes out, odds are the sport will be different. For one thing, fans in the future will hear much less about the National Pastime and much more about baseball, the multi-billion-dollar business. The strike is an old-fashioned economic power struggle, more reminiscent of the ideological battles of the '20s and '30s than of the pragmatic labor-management world of the '90s.The owners have a right under our free enterprise system to put a lid on their employees' salaries, if they have the strength to get away with it. And the players have a right to insist on a free market for their labor, if they can make it stick.
SPORTS
August 11, 1994
Ask the owners and players whether they want to wipe out the last two months of the season and the answer from both sides is a resounding no. Still, a players strike set for Friday may do just that. The key dispute is whether the owners really are losing money and headed toward financial ruin, as many hard-liners contend. The players don't believe that, nor does Andrew Zimbalist, a Smith College professor and author of "Baseball and Billions," a 1992 book exploring the sport's economics. Zimbalist, a former consultant to the players union, spoke recently with Sun Staff Writer Mark Hyman.
NEWS
By Jeff Hooke | February 21, 2011
The NFL is experiencing a boom time. Super Bowl viewership hit an all time high this year, and fan interest is intense. Financially speaking, the league is doing quite well. Over the last 10 years, the typical franchise has doubled in value — from $500 million to $1 billion — giving the league a total worth of $32 billion. The combination of capital appreciation and cash dividends means the average owner makes perhaps $75 million per year from football. At the same time, player compensation has increased steadily, and the median salary is now $800,000.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | July 17, 2001
THE CUBS, of all teams, awoke with the best record in the National League yesterday. The Mariners, of all teams, are on a pace to win 117 games. The Twins, with their pint-sized payroll, apparently are for real. Throw in the surprising Phillies and Diamondbacks, Barry Bonds' pursuit of Mark McGwire's home run record and Cal Ripken's farewell drama, and you're looking at one terrific major-league baseball season. Alas, it comes with an apocalyptic warning attached: You'd better enjoy what you're watching, because there's no telling when you might see it again.
SPORTS
December 3, 1998
NBA games lost yesterday: 6.Total games missed: 209.Earliest estimated date that season can start: Jan. 1.Projected player salary losses (through Jan. 1): $330 million.Negotiations: Will resume today in New York with full committees representing owners and players.Today's best canceled game: New York at New Jersey. The cross-town adversaries would have renewed their rivalry, with Knicks fans almost certainly outnumbering Nets fans despite the game being played at the Meadowlands.Pub Date: 12/03/98
NEWS
November 29, 1996
YOU CAN'T blame fans for their skepticism about the long-overdue accord between baseball owners and players. So much has been lost during this dispute.Two strike-shortened seasons. A year without a World Series. Utter contempt for the public shown by both sides. Losses of $1 billion for owners, $400 million for players. Sagging attendance and TV ratings. Fans angrily turning away from the former national pastime.Salvaging a labor agreement at least prevents matters from getting worse for a few years.
NEWS
By Fay Vincent | April 5, 1995
NAPOLEON IS supposed to have sacked generals he said were unlucky.Perhaps baseball owners will explain what just happened to them as "bad luck" -- though of course none of them will be sacked.But bad luck cannot account for the absurd events of the past seven months since the players went on strike and the owners vowed to get a salary cap.Now, as "real" baseball returns, we have the acting commissioner expressing pleasure that his fellow owners accepted the players' "unconditional" offer to return to work.
SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | April 4, 1995
It should have been a perfectly joyous occasion at Camden Yards yesterday. All the elements were there.Bright, sunny weather with the temperature at 60 degrees; the grass well-manicured and invitingly green; Pete Angelos smiling behind a microphone near home plate; Gov. Parris N. Glendening beside him, standing tall and erect and wearing a tie decorated with baseballs.Yes, baseball was back, as the page one headlines screamed and as the TV and radio newscasts blared in their lead items.The major league players strike was over and the owners had accepted their offer to return to work.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | July 17, 2001
THE CUBS, of all teams, awoke with the best record in the National League yesterday. The Mariners, of all teams, are on a pace to win 117 games. The Twins, with their pint-sized payroll, apparently are for real. Throw in the surprising Phillies and Diamondbacks, Barry Bonds' pursuit of Mark McGwire's home run record and Cal Ripken's farewell drama, and you're looking at one terrific major-league baseball season. Alas, it comes with an apocalyptic warning attached: You'd better enjoy what you're watching, because there's no telling when you might see it again.
NEWS
February 9, 1995
Barely a week from what should be the start of baseball's spring training, major league owners and players are no closer to settling their labor dispute than they were six months ago. When the president of the United States can't jawbone a settlement in a labor dispute with high public interest, a voluntary agreement is nowhere near in sight. And Mr. Clinton's call on Congress to impose binding arbitration holds little promise.Union leaders have long seemed to be relying on eventual federal action of one sort or another to break the deadlock with the owners.
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