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Owen Wilson

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August 16, 2009
On August 13, 2009, , (retired U.S. Navy veteran) of Glenville PA. and formerly of Parkville; beloved husband of Rosina V. Stuart; devoted father of Joanne Franta, Sharon Talbott, Jack Stuart, Owen Stuart Jr. and the late Carol Dosh; cherished grandfather of Tina, Dawn, Michael, Tracy, David, Rachel, Jason and great-grandfather of nine; dear brother of Charlotte Albert, Alice King, Rhoda Whystell the late Roland Stuart, Olive Shrieves, Harold Stuart and...
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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa , Sam.sessa@baltsun.com | December 8, 2009
For months, Bryan and Michael Voltaggio have tried to outdo each other on the hit reality TV show "Top Chef." Both brothers, who hail from Frederick, made it to the final round, along with Kevin Gillespie. Tomorrow, the contestants have one last chance to impress the judges and vie for the title. Will the winner be Bryan, the older, even-tempered brother who runs Volt in Frederick? Or Michael, the cocky, tattooed chef who now lives on the West Coast and likes pushing the limits?
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By RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 2006
Owen Wilson may be the only Oscar-nominated screenwriter who's never owned a computer. He's not going to take the plunge now at the advanced age of 37 because he's afraid he'd get addicted to computer games. "I'll look at these ads for these war games they have, and they look so cool." He elongates the word for effect. "I feel I could really lose myself." It's hard to reconcile the various faces of Wilson: the competitive devotee of pingpong, foosball, bocce and head soccer (soccer played on a tennis court)
NEWS
August 16, 2009
On August 13, 2009, , (retired U.S. Navy veteran) of Glenville PA. and formerly of Parkville; beloved husband of Rosina V. Stuart; devoted father of Joanne Franta, Sharon Talbott, Jack Stuart, Owen Stuart Jr. and the late Carol Dosh; cherished grandfather of Tina, Dawn, Michael, Tracy, David, Rachel, Jason and great-grandfather of nine; dear brother of Charlotte Albert, Alice King, Rhoda Whystell the late Roland Stuart, Olive Shrieves, Harold Stuart and...
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 14, 2006
You, Me and Dupree should be just the thing for fans of Owen Wilson's stock-in-trade, the self-absorbed, chronic adolescent with - as inevitably revealed in the final act - a heart of pure gold. The rest of the world, however, is going to wonder what all the fuss is about - when the film is not focused on Wilson, it's really not focused at all. This is a comedy ever holding itself in check, filled with plot threads and asides that seem as though they should be funny but almost always fall short of the mark.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | March 21, 2008
Drillbit Taylor, with Owen Wilson as a flake-for-hire bodyguard to a trio of high-school uber-nerds, has plenty of heart. It also has a made-to-order audience in the millions of us who tend to identify more with the geeky outcasts in high-school comedies than the bullies who torment or the big men on campus who routinely eclipse them. If only it had some funny lines, a focused plot and an idea that stretched beyond the initial setup. Drillbit Taylor (Paramount Pictures) Starring Owen Wilson, Nate Hartley, Troy Gentile.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 9, 2006
Pixar's beguiling comedy-drama Cars, the latest alternate universe envisioned by computer-animation pioneer John Lasseter (the Toy Story movies, A Bug's Life), contains no humans, only automobiles that have human features: eyeballs in the middle of their windshields, eyebrows at the top of them, and mouths and teeth under the grilles. These cars overflow with heart, wit and new ideas. And the picture has a moviemaking fearlessness that conventional directors would be wise to emulate. At a time when blockbuster directors panic at the thought of slackening their pace and giving an audience time to feel something, Lasseter turns a portrait of hot-shot Lightning McQueen (Owen Wilson)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 12, 2007
An off-screen suicide attempt and an on-screen death betray the slightness of The Darjeeling Limited, an only intermittently amusing movie about three privileged, estranged brothers (Owen Wilson, Adrien Brody and Jason Schwartzman) who embark on a crackpot journey in search of spiritual enlightenment. Despite the reputation of the director and co-writer, Wes Anderson (Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums), the movie is no lyrical farce but an upscale slapstick comedy-team movie. Remember the early-'60s run of Three Stooges features, such as The Three Stooges In Orbit?
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel | September 3, 1995
Lou Gehrig's Yankee Stadium monument says his "amazing record of 2,130 consecutive games should stand for all time." The words were written 19 years before Cal Ripken was born. Sometimes, forever isn't a long time. How likely are some other "unbreakable" records to break?Players, CommentsCy Young -- DOWN -- 511 wins, career. A pitcher would have to average 25.5 wins over 20 seasons. Even Sidd Finch couldn't do that.Joe DiMaggio -- DOWN -- 56-game hit streak. SABR's Bill James re-created Boggs' .368 1985 season 1,000 times but never matched the feat.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 30, 2004
The Big Bounce takes much of its deadpan plot, characters and dialogue from an Elmore Leonard novel about love and friendship among scam artists and thieves, then transfers it all from a Michigan resort to the North Shore of Oahu, where big waves, surfers and bathing beauties can be used as visual palate-cleansers. Hawaii is not a bad place to be this time of year, but the tension between a genial drifter (Owen Wilson) and a beach-bunny femme fatale (Sara Foster), who coerces him to help her rip off his ex-employer and her sometime sex partner and keeper (Gary Sinise)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | May 22, 2009
N ight at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian takes a great idea - what if the inhabitants of a museum came to life at night? - and milks it for every drop of fun it's worth. Happily, it's worth plenty. Rodin's The Thinker stops thinking and starts talking. A Roy Lichtenstein pop-art woman cries. A balloon dog scampers about. Albert Einstein bobbleheads simplify complex equations - even though, with all that nodding, it's tough to figure whether they're signaling yes or no. This sequel to 2006's Night at the Museum, in which an ancient Egyptian tablet brought to life the figures inside New York's American Museum of Natural History, ups both the energy and the laugh quotient.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | February 13, 2009
Capsules by unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button: **** It starts in 1918, when Benjamin Button (Brad Pitt) is born with an old face, dilapidated plumbing and wrinkled skin over an infant body, and ends in 2005, when his true love, Daisy (Cate Blanchett), completes the telling of his story. The movie's emotional completeness leaves you poised between sobbing and applauding - it comes from a full comprehension not just of one man's life, but of the intersection of many lives over the course of the 20th century.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | March 21, 2008
Drillbit Taylor, with Owen Wilson as a flake-for-hire bodyguard to a trio of high-school uber-nerds, has plenty of heart. It also has a made-to-order audience in the millions of us who tend to identify more with the geeky outcasts in high-school comedies than the bullies who torment or the big men on campus who routinely eclipse them. If only it had some funny lines, a focused plot and an idea that stretched beyond the initial setup. Drillbit Taylor (Paramount Pictures) Starring Owen Wilson, Nate Hartley, Troy Gentile.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 12, 2007
An off-screen suicide attempt and an on-screen death betray the slightness of The Darjeeling Limited, an only intermittently amusing movie about three privileged, estranged brothers (Owen Wilson, Adrien Brody and Jason Schwartzman) who embark on a crackpot journey in search of spiritual enlightenment. Despite the reputation of the director and co-writer, Wes Anderson (Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums), the movie is no lyrical farce but an upscale slapstick comedy-team movie. Remember the early-'60s run of Three Stooges features, such as The Three Stooges In Orbit?
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 14, 2006
You, Me and Dupree should be just the thing for fans of Owen Wilson's stock-in-trade, the self-absorbed, chronic adolescent with - as inevitably revealed in the final act - a heart of pure gold. The rest of the world, however, is going to wonder what all the fuss is about - when the film is not focused on Wilson, it's really not focused at all. This is a comedy ever holding itself in check, filled with plot threads and asides that seem as though they should be funny but almost always fall short of the mark.
FEATURES
By RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 2006
Owen Wilson may be the only Oscar-nominated screenwriter who's never owned a computer. He's not going to take the plunge now at the advanced age of 37 because he's afraid he'd get addicted to computer games. "I'll look at these ads for these war games they have, and they look so cool." He elongates the word for effect. "I feel I could really lose myself." It's hard to reconcile the various faces of Wilson: the competitive devotee of pingpong, foosball, bocce and head soccer (soccer played on a tennis court)
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | February 13, 2009
Capsules by unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button: **** It starts in 1918, when Benjamin Button (Brad Pitt) is born with an old face, dilapidated plumbing and wrinkled skin over an infant body, and ends in 2005, when his true love, Daisy (Cate Blanchett), completes the telling of his story. The movie's emotional completeness leaves you poised between sobbing and applauding - it comes from a full comprehension not just of one man's life, but of the intersection of many lives over the course of the 20th century.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 17, 2003
The one daring joke in the action comedy National Security comes near the beginning. A black man, Martin Lawrence, gets a white cop, Steve Zahn, tossed into prison when a videocam captures the officer clubbing him without mercy. But the audience knows that the tape lies: Zahn was trying to beat away a bumblebee because Lawrence is allergic to the insect. This gleefully unfair reversal gets viewers hoping for the freewheeling racial vaudeville of an Undercover Brother. What ensues, unfortunately, is yet another odd-couple car-chase movie in which the cocky, gabby African-American and the righteous, taciturn Caucasian trade punches and bond before they bag the bad guys.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW AND CHRIS KALTENBACH and MICHAEL SRAGOW AND CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITICS | June 30, 2006
Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach, except where noted. Full reviews at baltimoresun.com/movies. Akeelah and the Bee -- follows a formula, one of the oldest in all of fiction: an underdog, struggling against the odds, seeks fame, fortune and - most importantly - self-respect. But this is one of the most winning movies of 2006 in its abundance of great intentions. (C.K.) PG 112 minutes B+ An Inconvenient Truth -- is more than a documentary of Al Gore's dynamic traveling slide show about global warming.
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