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By New York Times News Service | July 17, 1994
U.S. adults may be more aware of the need to exercise and count calories than they once were, but more of them than ever are overweight.The number of overweight adults, which had remained stable at about a fourth of the adult population from 1960 through 1980, suddenly jumped to a third of all adults between 1980 and 1991, according to a recent study by the National Center for Health Statistics in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.For...
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SPORTS
Mike Preston | July 25, 2013
Not breaking news: Ravens left offensive tackle Bryant McKinnie wasn't on the practice field for the first full day of training camp. Oh, well, death, taxes and McKinnie being overweight ... The giant tackle was missing Thursday, which left a gaping hole or two in the offensive line, and that would have been a major story for most teams. But for the Ravens, it was just another ho-hum moment. In fact, it would have been news if McKinnie, a 12-year veteran, had participated.
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NEWS
By Sindya N. Bhanoo and Sindya N. Bhanoo,Sun reporter | July 26, 2007
Forget the common cold - it's fat you might catch from your best friend. A new study finds that obesity "spreads" through social networks. And, incidentally, so does skinniness. "We are not suggesting people break ties with overweight friends, but making friends or forming ties with people who are the proper weight is likely to be beneficial," said Nicholas Christakis, the Harvard sociologist who led the study. The study, which was published in today's New England Journal of Medicine, indicated that a person's chances of becoming obese increase by 57 percent if someone he identifies as a friend becomes obese.
NEWS
February 23, 2010
Recently movie director/actor Kevin Smith was thrown off a Southwest Airlines flight because he is overweight and apparently had trouble fitting into his seat or was extending over into his neighbor's seat. This is discrimination, but on the other hand, other passengers' rights would be infringed upon if he hung over into their space. What the airlines need to do to accommodate larger passengers is to have the airline manufacturers build or convert existing planes with several rows of larger seats.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | June 14, 2007
Loralie Thomas walked the manicured grounds of the city's Federal Hill Park on Tuesday and delighted in seeing so many families enjoying the sunny outdoors. She and her husband look forward to starting their own family someday, but for now, that's out of the question. Her doctor recently deemed her too fat to bear children. Those words were enough for the formerly 241-pound Chicago resident to get off the dieting roller coaster and switch to the new, exciting way to lose weight: reality television.
NEWS
By Jeremy Manier and Jeremy Manier,Chicago Tribune | December 29, 2006
CHICAGO -- More than a third of disadvantaged 3-year-olds in Baltimore and other major U.S. cities are overweight or obese, according to a new study that supports the notion that the struggle with obesity often begins in early childhood. Hispanic children were most at risk, with 45 percent either overweight or obese. The study's authors at the University of Wisconsin in Madison also identified several practices that may protect kids from excessive weight gain, including breast-feeding for at least six months and not allowing children to take a bottle to bed. "What we know really tells us that this age is a critical period," said Dr. Jonathan Necheles, a pediatrician with the obesity prevention program at Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago who was involved with the study.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2005
Greg Peyser and Benson Erwin never think of themselves as overweight. As members of Johns Hopkins' top-ranked lacrosse team, they lift weights two to three times a week, and five days a week they run, scrimmage and hustle through a series of agility, shooting, passing and defensive drills "I feel like I'm in the best shape of my life," said Erwin, 23, a senior majoring in international studies. But all is not as it seems. Because both athletes are 6 feet 1 inch tall and weigh about 200 pounds, they're both overweight - according to federal standards - and so are most of their teammates.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1997
TAMPA, Fla. -- The New York Yankees are getting their first long look at free-agent pitcher David Wells, and they have to be wondering how they ever let Jimmy Key get away.Wells made a bad enough first impression when he broke his pitching hand in a San Diego street fight in January, but his image has taken a further beating the first few days of spring training.He has been unable to participate in full workouts because of a lingering case of gout that has inflamed the joint in his right big toe, the same problem that sidelined him in Baltimore for two weeks last May. It is a condition that is aggravated by certain foods and alcohol, but Wells was defiant when reporters asked him Tuesday if the problem might be the result of his indulgent lifestyle.
NEWS
May 16, 2004
Twenty-six percent of U.S. children ages 2-12 are overweight. -- American Medical Association
FEATURES
By FROM LADIES' HOME JOURNAL Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 26, 1995
"My husband makes me feel like everything is my fault," says Janice, 30, the mother of a 5-year-old. "I can't hold my own in an argument with him. He misinterprets everything I say."When Janice first met Henry he seemed to be the most caring and charming man in the world. But these days Henry reacts with hostility to everything she says, and he's a master of the backhanded compliment. "Last week, I had my hair cut in a stylish new way. Henry said, 'Why'd you cut your hair? It looked so much better the other way.' Of course he never told me I looked good in the old style.
NEWS
By Cyril O. Enwonwu | July 5, 2009
A report released last week shows that obesity is harming the health of millions of Americans, including children and teens. The report, "F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies are Failing in America 2009," from the Trust for America's Health, says that 28.8 percent of Maryland youths ages 10 to 17 are overweight or obese - and thus at increased risk of a long list of chronic health problems such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis and some cancers....
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | July 10, 2008
Zachary Aaronson scoured the nearly dozen photo albums in the home library, searching for the one pre-weight-loss picture that underscored what it's like to go from about 360 pounds more than a year ago to his current weight of 179. The 6-foot, 3-inch 18-year-old from Baltimore held up snapshots of himself as a youngster, wearing shirts that couldn't be buttoned over his protruding stomach and waistline. He wore colorful T-shirts underneath so the undersized garment wouldn't stand out. "It gets much worse," he says.
FEATURES
January 3, 2008
Neurology More evidence addiction is illness Drug or alcohol abusers who relapse, even after long periods of abstinence, are often reviled as too weak or undisciplined to straighten themselves out. But a University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill psychologist has found evidence that suggests, in fact, that addicts' brains may be wired in a way that makes them more prone to give in to temptation. The research, published in the December issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, provides further evidence that addiction is a disease, not a character flaw, says Charlotte Boettiger, an assistant professor of psychology at UNC-Chapel Hill and lead author of the paper.
NEWS
By Katie Menzer and Katie Menzer,[McClatchy-Tribune] | September 30, 2007
Fat cats are more common than you think. Husky huskies are, too. Researchers say that about a quarter of all household pets are overweight and that the animal epidemic follows the obesity increase found in humans nationwide. Obesity rates for humans rose in 31 states last year, according to a recently released study by the nonprofit Trust for America's Health. And some scientists say things are no better for your pet. "There's common agreement that obesity in pets is more of a problem than ever," said Donald C. Beitz, a professor of nutritional biochemistry at Iowa State University and chairman of a former subcommittee on dog and cat nutrition for the National Academies' National Research Council.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2007
For the third year in a row, Mississippi is the fattest state in the country and Colorado the leanest, but the obesity rate is increasing in all states, according to a report released yesterday. This year, Mississippi became the first state to have more than 30 percent of its residents classified as obese, but 47 states are above 20 percent, including Maryland. Just 15 years ago, no state was above 15 percent, according to officials from the Trust for America's Health, which prepared the report using federal statistics obtained through telephone interviews.
NEWS
By Ericka Blount Danois and Ericka Blount Danois,Special to The Sun | August 5, 2007
For most of her career, Mo'Nique has championed the cause of big and voluptuous women. The Baltimore native and host of VH1's Charm School and of Oxygen's Mo'Nique's F.A.T. Chance has waged a campaign to improve the image and gain acceptance for plus-size women, who are often shunned and made the objects of ridicule. Here's how she's lived out her crusade: As a stand-up comedian, the 39-year-old has manufactured plus-size humor that pokes fun at those who have a problem with her curves or skinny women, including: Recently filmed episodes of Mo'Nique's F.A.T.
NEWS
November 7, 1990
Callers to The Evening Sun's SUNDIAL are overweight and don't care. At last that's what the results from yesterday'squestions about personal weight seem to suggest.The Evening Sun wanted to know whether callers thought they were overweight, underweight or at the perfect weight. The majority, 152 of the 233 callers, (67 percent) said they were overweight. Eight said they were underweight and 62 said they were at the perfect weight.But a majority of the callers also said they did not diet during 1990, nor do they plan to diet after the holidays.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun Reporter | June 14, 2007
Weight-loss reality TV shows: Fat March(ABC): Debuts in August. A dozen overweight individuals attempt a 550-mile, 10-week walk from Boston to Washington for a chance to share a $1.2 million prize. The Biggest Loser (NBC): October 2004 to present. Fourteen contestants compete for a grand prize of $250,000, enduring challenges, temptations, weigh-ins and eliminations until the final contestant remains to claim the title of the biggest loser. Mo'Nique's Fat Chance (Oxygen): August 2005 to present.
NEWS
By Daniel Costello and Daniel Costello,Los Angeles Times | July 29, 2007
Looking for new ways to trim the fat and boost workers' health, some employers are starting to make overweight employees pay if they don't slim down. Others, citing growing medical costs tied to obesity, are offering fit workers lucrative incentives that shave thousands of dollars a year off health care premiums. In one of the boldest moves yet, an Indiana-based hospital chain said last month that it had decided on the stick rather than the carrot. Starting in 2009, Clarian Health Partners said it will charge employees up to $30 every two weeks unless they meet weight, cholesterol and blood pressure guidelines the company deems healthy.
NEWS
By Sindya N. Bhanoo and Sindya N. Bhanoo,Sun reporter | July 26, 2007
Forget the common cold - it's fat you might catch from your best friend. A new study finds that obesity "spreads" through social networks. And, incidentally, so does skinniness. "We are not suggesting people break ties with overweight friends, but making friends or forming ties with people who are the proper weight is likely to be beneficial," said Nicholas Christakis, the Harvard sociologist who led the study. The study, which was published in today's New England Journal of Medicine, indicated that a person's chances of becoming obese increase by 57 percent if someone he identifies as a friend becomes obese.
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