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Overuse Injuries

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By Ronald MacKenzie and Ronald MacKenzie,Shape Magazine Distributed by the Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 6, 1990
The term "overuse injury" didn't exist until about 10 years ago. With the fitness boom and the proliferation of health clubs and gyms, more and more people are exercising -- and overexercising.Today, activities that stress repetitive movements, such as aerobics, running, swimming and cycling, are very popular.Unfortunately, these are the types of fitness pursuits that tend to cause overuse injuries. The body parts most often affected are the legs, shoulders and elbows.There are many reasons you might develop an overuse injury.
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By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | June 29, 2003
I've heard that Tylenol doesn't do anything to reduce inflammation, but it's easier on my stomach than ibuprofen. With my overuse injuries, does it make sense to take it? For acute overuse injuries, ibuprofen is best because it helps reduce inflammation, according to Dr. Howard Hauptman, a Towson-area rheumatologist. Common acute injuries include bursitis of the shoulder, tennis or golfer's elbow and a strain or sprain of the ankle or knee. For these, acetaminophen will relieve pain but won't reduce inflammation like ibuprofen will.
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FEATURES
By Jan Brogan and Jan Brogan,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL-BULLETIN Sun intern Ameer Benno contributed to this report | March 24, 1998
After four junior varsity soccer players came into his office on the same day with shin splints, Marshall Steele, a surgeon at the Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Center of Annapolis, called their coach to tell him he was running them too much.The coach had no idea -- none of the young athletes had mentioned any pain -- and thanked Steele for letting him know. Unfortunately, "Kids are afraid to talk with their coach about things like that," says Steele, team doctor for Annapolis High School.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | April 20, 2003
I have suffered from a number of overuse injuries, including rotator cuff pain and Achilles tendinitis. What can I do to avoid these types of injuries? Shoulder pain and tendinitis are two of the most common forms of overuse injuries. It's important to realize that, as you get older, you become more prone to these problems. If you are experiencing pain while exercising and ignore it, you are setting yourself up to get hurt. If you have an overuse injury, the No. 1 treatment is rest. Give it time to heal (this can vary from a few days to a few months, depending on the case)
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | April 20, 2003
I have suffered from a number of overuse injuries, including rotator cuff pain and Achilles tendinitis. What can I do to avoid these types of injuries? Shoulder pain and tendinitis are two of the most common forms of overuse injuries. It's important to realize that, as you get older, you become more prone to these problems. If you are experiencing pain while exercising and ignore it, you are setting yourself up to get hurt. If you have an overuse injury, the No. 1 treatment is rest. Give it time to heal (this can vary from a few days to a few months, depending on the case)
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | June 29, 2003
I've heard that Tylenol doesn't do anything to reduce inflammation, but it's easier on my stomach than ibuprofen. With my overuse injuries, does it make sense to take it? For acute overuse injuries, ibuprofen is best because it helps reduce inflammation, according to Dr. Howard Hauptman, a Towson-area rheumatologist. Common acute injuries include bursitis of the shoulder, tennis or golfer's elbow and a strain or sprain of the ankle or knee. For these, acetaminophen will relieve pain but won't reduce inflammation like ibuprofen will.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 28, 1992
Adults recall childhood as an endless blur of running and jumping, full of little cuts and bruises, but blissfully free of those nagging injuries that follow exercise later in life -- tendinitis, bursitis and stress fractures.Now, however, orthopedists and pediatricians say these injuries are cropping up with alarming frequency in children: from stress fractures of the lower spine in young gymnasts to shoulder tendinitis in swimmers to shin splints in aspiring marathoners."People are suddenly recognizing that it's a problem," said Dr. Carl L. Stanitski, chief of orthopedic surgery at the Children's Hospital of Michigan in Detroit.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | September 3, 2000
Take your pick. Either your child is an overweight couch potato who watches TV all day, or you have a stressed-out athlete with back problems, shin splints and chronic tendinitis. Today's parents must sometimes feel those are the only options. Kids don't seem to simply go outside and play anymore. Instead, they compete. In the past decade sports camps, leagues and travel teams have been added to school athletics. Sports like soccer and baseball now have more than one season. The result is that some pre-teens are dealing with the training regimen and game schedules of elite athletes.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Contributing writer | June 2, 1991
Grafton Bruce went up for a rebound Dec. 10.It was one of many he'd grabbed for in his 29-year basketball career; he'd reached for rebounds back at South Carroll High, and at Anne Arundel Community College, and several nights a week in the Carroll County Men's Leagues, where the 36-year-old had been playing since 1976.But this time, he stepped on another player's foot, and Bruce heard a pop -- a characteristic pop. Then he felt "excruciating pain.""When my foot came down, my knee just popped to the inside," says Bruce, who left the game in an ambulance.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 1997
We have a home computer and have just gone online. Our 9-year-old is fascinated and loves to surf the World Wide Web. It seems as though he would be content to do so for hours. Should we let him?The Web is a tremendous resource. It comprises a vast and ever-changing storehouse of information and entertainment. Like libraries and television, the Web has potential for educating your child.On the other hand, while the Web may be vibrant and fresh, it is also completely lacking in quality control.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | September 3, 2000
Take your pick. Either your child is an overweight couch potato who watches TV all day, or you have a stressed-out athlete with back problems, shin splints and chronic tendinitis. Today's parents must sometimes feel those are the only options. Kids don't seem to simply go outside and play anymore. Instead, they compete. In the past decade sports camps, leagues and travel teams have been added to school athletics. Sports like soccer and baseball now have more than one season. The result is that some pre-teens are dealing with the training regimen and game schedules of elite athletes.
FEATURES
By Phil Jackman | May 24, 1998
As a doctor at Baltimore's Union Memorial Hospital Sports Medicine Clinic, Bill Howard not only has seen and treated a thousand injuries, he's also had most of them himself."
FEATURES
By Jan Brogan and Jan Brogan,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL-BULLETIN Sun intern Ameer Benno contributed to this report | March 24, 1998
After four junior varsity soccer players came into his office on the same day with shin splints, Marshall Steele, a surgeon at the Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Center of Annapolis, called their coach to tell him he was running them too much.The coach had no idea -- none of the young athletes had mentioned any pain -- and thanked Steele for letting him know. Unfortunately, "Kids are afraid to talk with their coach about things like that," says Steele, team doctor for Annapolis High School.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 1997
We have a home computer and have just gone online. Our 9-year-old is fascinated and loves to surf the World Wide Web. It seems as though he would be content to do so for hours. Should we let him?The Web is a tremendous resource. It comprises a vast and ever-changing storehouse of information and entertainment. Like libraries and television, the Web has potential for educating your child.On the other hand, while the Web may be vibrant and fresh, it is also completely lacking in quality control.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 28, 1992
Adults recall childhood as an endless blur of running and jumping, full of little cuts and bruises, but blissfully free of those nagging injuries that follow exercise later in life -- tendinitis, bursitis and stress fractures.Now, however, orthopedists and pediatricians say these injuries are cropping up with alarming frequency in children: from stress fractures of the lower spine in young gymnasts to shoulder tendinitis in swimmers to shin splints in aspiring marathoners."People are suddenly recognizing that it's a problem," said Dr. Carl L. Stanitski, chief of orthopedic surgery at the Children's Hospital of Michigan in Detroit.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Contributing writer | June 2, 1991
Grafton Bruce went up for a rebound Dec. 10.It was one of many he'd grabbed for in his 29-year basketball career; he'd reached for rebounds back at South Carroll High, and at Anne Arundel Community College, and several nights a week in the Carroll County Men's Leagues, where the 36-year-old had been playing since 1976.But this time, he stepped on another player's foot, and Bruce heard a pop -- a characteristic pop. Then he felt "excruciating pain.""When my foot came down, my knee just popped to the inside," says Bruce, who left the game in an ambulance.
FEATURES
By Phil Jackman | May 24, 1998
As a doctor at Baltimore's Union Memorial Hospital Sports Medicine Clinic, Bill Howard not only has seen and treated a thousand injuries, he's also had most of them himself."
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2006
My child has been complaining of ankle and foot pain. I talked briefly with a friend who is a physical therapist. Could it be his shoes? It could be your child's shoes. But then, it could be something more serious. Kevin Crowley, a physical therapist and manager of Towson Sports Medicine Center, says any time a child is complaining of reoccurring pain, you should consult your physician. "As physical therapists," Crowley says, "we really can't diagnose patients. We help implement the treatment."
FEATURES
By Ronald MacKenzie and Ronald MacKenzie,Shape Magazine Distributed by the Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 6, 1990
The term "overuse injury" didn't exist until about 10 years ago. With the fitness boom and the proliferation of health clubs and gyms, more and more people are exercising -- and overexercising.Today, activities that stress repetitive movements, such as aerobics, running, swimming and cycling, are very popular.Unfortunately, these are the types of fitness pursuits that tend to cause overuse injuries. The body parts most often affected are the legs, shoulders and elbows.There are many reasons you might develop an overuse injury.
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