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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
When Baltimore County police officer James D. Laboard was acquitted last month in the death of 17-year-old Christopher Brown, he was entitled to back pay he lost after his indictment. The officer also requested and received overtime for the June 2012 night he confronted Brown, who was with a group of teens who had thrown rocks at the officer's door. When Laboard caught up to Brown, the two fought and the teen died of asphyxiation. The request supports "the stipulation that he was on duty," said Laboard's attorney, Ezra S. Gollogly.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2013
After months of intense, closed-door bargaining, negotiators for the Rawlings-Blake administration and Baltimore's fire unions have reached an agreement that would give firefighters a 16.5 percent pay raise in exchange for working more hours, according to documents reviewed by The Baltimore Sun. The agreement, which rank-and-file union members will vote on Tuesday, represents a concession from City Hall after firefighters overwhelmingly rejected an...
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NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | September 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Social Security Administration has added 3,038 employees -- including 454 in the Baltimore area -- to its list of those eligible for overtime pay and back pay for previous overtime work as a result of a federal agency's ruling.Piles of paperwork must be plowed through before the total amount of the reimbursement is known; sources were unable to estimate a total. Some employees will be entitled to thousands of dollars.The addition of these employees to the overtime rolls stems from a Federal Labor Relations Authority decision in April.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
When Baltimore County police officer James D. Laboard was acquitted last month in the death of 17-year-old Christopher Brown, he was entitled to back pay he lost after his indictment. The officer also requested and received overtime for the June 2012 night he confronted Brown, who was with a group of teens who had thrown rocks at the officer's door. When Laboard caught up to Brown, the two fought and the teen died of asphyxiation. The request supports "the stipulation that he was on duty," said Laboard's attorney, Ezra S. Gollogly.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1997
At least one thing was made clear at last night's County Council meeting, where members discussed the new personnel system scheduled to take effect in the fall for Howard County's 1,850 employees: Police and Fire Department middle managers will most likely continue receiving overtime pay.Earlier this month, a consultant's report recommended that police sergeants and lieutenants and fire captains and battalion chiefs be exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act,...
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 19, 1997
Three former members and one current member of the kitchen staff at Loews Annapolis Hotel have filed a federal suit seeking a total of $38,000 in overtime.John G. Newgent of Stevensville, Abraham Torres of Washington, and Jeffrey W. Ledford and Natalie R. Shumard, both of Annapolis, allege that they are owed overtime dating to 1991 for work they did at catered events at the hotel.Ledford was a supervisor, or "banquet captain," from 1991 to 1995, according to the suit, and the others have been waiters during the past few years, the lawsuit says.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1998
A federal court decision awarding Anne Arundel County paramedics overtime pay could create new difficulties in a county with a tax ceiling and a Fire Department that spends more on overtime than any other department.Retroactive pay for the 143 paramedics who brought the lawsuit could add nearly $4 million to the EMS/Fire/Rescue budget of $46.6 million, officials said. The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals decision, rendered Feb. 18 in Richmond, Va., could open the door to suits for overtime by firefighters who give medical aid.The ruling's possible repercussions could change the Fire Department's structure and harden distinctions between firefighters and paramedics that the fire chief has struggled to obliterate.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun Reporter | February 7, 2007
Six Baltimore police officers were suspended yesterday as part of an internal affairs investigation into possible "irregularities" with their overtime pay, a department spokesman said. The officers - two sergeants and four detectives - worked in criminal investigations in the department's Eastern District when they filed for overtime that is now being reviewed by internal affairs investigators, police said. One of the sergeants was recently transferred to the Northeastern District, police said.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2000
The latest audit by City Comptroller Joan M. Pratt's office criticizes the city Department of Parks and Recreation for sloppy cash management and failing to monitor $500,000 in overtime pay, resulting in at least one worker earning almost double his salary. The audit findings have angered Mayor Martin O'Malley, who called the money management the worst he has seen since his election last December. "Of all the city agencies, I don't think anyone has been sloppier than recreation and parks," O'Malley said.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff writer | January 19, 1992
After narrowly escaping layoffs and facing an uncertain future, county police sergeants have formed a union they say could give them job security and collective bargaining rights.The newly formed union -- the Anne Arundel County Sergeants Association Local 123 -- has been approved for membership into the International Union of Police Associations (IUPA), an affiliate of the AFL-CIO, said Sam Cabral, IUPA'ssecretary/treasurer.The union, which already counts about 35 members from among the department's 75 sergeants, appointed four temporary officers at its first meeting, Jan. 8, said president Sgt. Dale Thomas of the Eastern District station.
NEWS
June 20, 2013
With warmer weather and an expected increase in violence approaching, the Baltimore Police Department is burning through its overtime budget at a record clip and stressing the physical capacities of its officers to the limit. City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts says the problem stems from a large number of vacancies among the department's sworn officers and frequent turnover as experienced members of the force leave for higher-paying jobs in the suburbs. Yet it's not at all clear that plugging the gaps with officers on overtime is sustainable — either economically or as a crime-fighting strategy.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
  Baltimore City posted new pay data for city workers on its Open Baltimore website Wednesday, and the numbers once again illustrate how overtime can help lift incomes far above annual salary levels. The figures show that 328 municipal employees - 172 at the Police Department - received gross pay at least 50 percent above their salary. The data covers fiscal 2012, which ended June 30. Police Lt. Stephen C. Nalewajko Jr. made more money than MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake, earning $166,200 compared to the mayor's gross pay of $161,800.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
The Baltimore Police Department has increased overtime spending over the past year amid a struggle to fill vacancies, according to data obtained by The Baltimore Sun. The city spent 40 percent more in the fiscal year through June compared with the year before, and overtime spending so far this fiscal year is on track to increase by another 40 percent, according to statistics provided by the department in response to a public information act...
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2010
Citing pay disparity and the potential loss of officers, Anne Arundel County Councilman James Benoit has introduced legislation that would allow county police lieutenants to unionize. Frustrated that subordinates earn more money and have greater job protections, the lieutenants have been trying to become part of a bargaining unit since last year but have been rebuffed by a county government that opposes unionization of management personnel. "The injustice is, the lieutenants get less pay than the cops that work for them," said Benoit, a Democrat.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Hundreds of Baltimore City employees over the past three years have earned overtime pay equal to more than half their annual salary, even as the cash-starved city has reduced overtime payments by nearly a third, an analysis by The Baltimore Sun shows. Among the highest overtime earners are 36 police officers and one firefighter who took home more than the mayor during at least one of the past three years for which data was available. One officer earned $173,791; another made $153,160.
NEWS
By From staff and Sun news services | April 4, 2009
Madonna adoption request rejected On Friday, a judge rejected Madonna's request to adopt a second child from Malawi and said it would set a dangerous precedent to bend rules requiring that prospective parents live there for some period. Madonna's lawyer, Alan Chinula, said he has "filed notice for appeal in the Supreme Court of Appeal." The country's child welfare minister had come out Thursday in support of the pop superstar's application to adopt a 3-year-old. But in a lengthy ruling Friday, Judge Esme Chombo sided with critics who have said exceptions should not be made for the star, who has set up a major development project for the impoverished African country.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2000
Federal prosecutors are usually pitted against murderers, drug dealers, and multimillion-dollar fraud artists. But in a nationwide lawsuit unfolding in Baltimore, they're pitted against their bosses at the U.S. Justice Department. About 9,100 former and current government lawyers around the country are claiming that the Justice Department cheated them of more than $300 million in overtime pay, and the U.S. attorney's office in Baltimore is the focus site for the prosecutors' case. The case has become heated, with Justice officials suggesting in legal documents that the lawyers are working overtime because they are taking excessive lunch hours and going to the gym on government time.
BUSINESS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,Los Angeles Times | June 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The nation's growing cadre of home health care aides is not entitled to minimum wages or overtime pay under federal law, even if they work for private employers, the Supreme Court ruled yesterday. The 9-0 decision, which keeps in place a long-standing rule that denies minimum wages and overtime pay to those who provide "companionship services" at home, could trigger a move in Congress to amend the law. With an estimated 1 million workers now assisting the elderly and the disabled in their homes, unions and civil rights groups had urged the justices to scrap this rule because they say it deprives many of the nation's lowest-paid workers of a living wage.
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