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Overpopulation

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NEWS
July 18, 2011
Ron Smith is surely right when he writes, "There are now too many people to manage. " ("Population, debt problems so big, they defy solutions," July 15). But his assertion that global population is projected to increase by 50 percent by mid-century is a worst-case scenario, according to United Nations population projections. The UN offers three projections: low, medium, and high. The 50 percent increase mentioned by Mr. Smith, which would amount to a world population of 10.5 billion by 2050 (compared with our present 7 billion)
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NEWS
March 8, 2013
Op-ed writer George Fenwick's assertion that trap, neuter and release programs (TNR) lead to an increase in the number of uninoculated species is unfounded. He obviously does not understand how TNR works. TNR is a program that allows a cat caretaker to trap their feral cat, bring it to a facility to be spayed/neutered and vaccinated for rabies and then released back into the colony. This caretaker will care for the cat the rest of its life. This caretaker feeds the cat, which results in less predation on the bird population.
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EXPLORE
September 27, 2011
I read the story in the Sept. 21 edition of the Towson Times ("Towson-area enrollments prompt study for new elementary school"), and know from previous news coverage over the years about the overcrowding in our school system. First off, when I attended Baltimore County public schools, there was no such thing as overcrowding. That was because we did not have an overpopulation issue then. Just looking at the block where I live, there are 26 homes. Of those, 11 have school-age children (under 18)
EXPLORE
September 27, 2011
I read the story in the Sept. 21 edition of the Towson Times ("Towson-area enrollments prompt study for new elementary school"), and know from previous news coverage over the years about the overcrowding in our school system. First off, when I attended Baltimore County public schools, there was no such thing as overcrowding. That was because we did not have an overpopulation issue then. Just looking at the block where I live, there are 26 homes. Of those, 11 have school-age children (under 18)
NEWS
November 22, 1991
As Todd Ballantine's column in the adjacent space points out, environmental activism is a losing battle unless world population growth is brought under control. People, wherever they live, consume natural resources. More people mean that more and more resources will be necessary simply to keep most of the world at subsistence levels. Thus, it is pointless to address environmental problems without also taking into account the need to control the number of people the planet must support.But the link between population and the environment is not the only connection we must learn to make.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
Op-ed writer George Fenwick's assertion that trap, neuter and release programs (TNR) lead to an increase in the number of uninoculated species is unfounded. He obviously does not understand how TNR works. TNR is a program that allows a cat caretaker to trap their feral cat, bring it to a facility to be spayed/neutered and vaccinated for rabies and then released back into the colony. This caretaker will care for the cat the rest of its life. This caretaker feeds the cat, which results in less predation on the bird population.
NEWS
By ANDREW BARD SCHMOOKLER | September 28, 1993
Broadway, Virginia. -- For generations, it has generally been the bigoted and narrow-minded who have been the foes of immigration. Humane and broad-minded people have said with Emma Lazarus, ''Give me your tired, your poor . . .'' But the world has changed, and in the face of these changes, the broadest perspective requires us to say: ''It is time to close the door to substantial new immigration to the United States.''The crucial change is the emergence of overpopulation as one of the most urgent problems besetting humankind.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 23, 2000
MILLBURN, N.J. -- Like many of their neighbors across the suburbs, the people of Millburn have had it with Bambi. They are sick of deer eating their garbage, tomato plants and azaleas. They associate deer more with Lyme disease and highway collisions than with the wonders of nature. Last year, town workers picked up 100 battered carcasses from local roads, double the number of a decade ago. "They've become a major safety hazard," said Judith Kramer, a lawyer who lives in the town's Short Hills section.
NEWS
July 25, 1999
Hotel construction, historic preservation can be done togetherRecent articles in The Sun have chronicled efforts to build as many as nine new hotels in Baltimore ("Marriott hotel starts going up at harbor," July 21 and "City's financial aid for hotel supported," July 16). Comparisons to similar efforts in Philadelphia are instructive.Although the two cities are each planning projects that will create about 4,000 hotel rooms, in Philadelphia more than 75 percent of them will be in adaptively re-used historic buildings.
NEWS
March 4, 1994
Bike HelmetsThe news article, "Helmet law battle revived," Feb. 25, states that the pro-helmet supporters have "statistics" which show that the helmet law "saved" 11 lives and that the number of motorcyclists admitted to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center with serious head injuries decreased by 17 percent.While I do not dispute that there were 11 less motorcycle fatalities or that Shock Trauma cases decreased, I do question whether all the statistics were taken into account. I do not feel that these reductions should automatically be attributed to a mandatory helmet law.I did not see any mention in the article of motorcycle usage in our state.
NEWS
July 18, 2011
Ron Smith is surely right when he writes, "There are now too many people to manage. " ("Population, debt problems so big, they defy solutions," July 15). But his assertion that global population is projected to increase by 50 percent by mid-century is a worst-case scenario, according to United Nations population projections. The UN offers three projections: low, medium, and high. The 50 percent increase mentioned by Mr. Smith, which would amount to a world population of 10.5 billion by 2050 (compared with our present 7 billion)
NEWS
By Ron Smith | July 14, 2011
The world's elite have a problem so big it can't even be hinted at in public discussion: There are now too many people to manage. Seven billion and counting, billions more than are needed for human societies to flourish — and thus, most dispensable in this age where technology enables ever more work to be done by ever fewer workers. Global population is projected to increase by 50 percent by 2050, and despite the ongoing pretense that natural resources are infinite, the fact is they are not, and the smart people know this.
NEWS
By Cindy Ross | April 4, 2011
The sky is beginning to glow pink as we bank the turn into the entrance of Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area in Pennsylvania. We hurry, not wanting to miss the show that is about to begin. Although we can't see the estimated 100,000 snow geese floating on the sheltered lagoon, we hear their communal voices. It's March, and these magnificent white birds are here for only a few weeks during their migratory passage to the Arctic. After resting and fattening up on local farm crops, they'll continue north to Canada's St. Lawrence River, ending eventually at their Alaskan mating and breeding grounds.
NEWS
By Chris Bolgiano | May 9, 2010
It was Mother's Day, and the staff of the independent-living community where my mother resides had arranged a nice luncheon, with roses for all the mothers. When a cherubic child with golden ringlets pressed a flower into my hand, and I politely refused it, she became confused. No wonder, since it was assumed by everyone that, of course, all adult women in attendance were mothers At fifty-something I am an adult but not a mother. And though some will gasp in horror, I consider that to be my greatest achievement as a conservationist (although finding the first saw-whet owl ever reported in my part of Virginia ranks pretty high, too)
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2005
I SEE ASMA NAEEM, 7, on the front page of The Sun, and read how her family came from Pakistan to Howard County for the American Dream - one drop in an immigrant tide that fuels much of Maryland's and America's population growth. And I'm torn. Instead of thinking, "Welcome aboard, neighbors," I'm thinking we must sharply restrict people like them from coming here. By "people like them," I don't mean brown people, people from different cultures or religions - and I certainly don't mean the Naeems personally.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2003
Responding to angry parents, who vow to drag them kicking and screaming if necessary to do something about school crowding, the Harford County executive and County Council members moved last week to work more closely together to solve what is being called a crisis in education. "I encourage members of the County Council to work collectively among themselves and with me to address the school issue," said County Executive James M. Harkins. "I'm optimistic that if we can work together, we can come up with solutions."
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | May 25, 1993
The German statesman whose own father became ensnared in Nazism and a moviemaker who found universal truths in Baltimore neighborhoods told graduates of the Johns Hopkins University yesterday that hope for humankind resides in individual values."
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2002
THIS WEEK, The Sun editorial page featured an excellent series promoting Smart Growth, making a compelling case for checking the sprawl development that is needlessly trashing the Chesapeake Bay region's remaining natural landscapes. Yet the series makes a very flawed assumption - all the more troubling because the same assumption is made, implicitly if not overtly, by nearly every environmental organization in this nation: "Growth is inevitable - and welcome," says the editorial, as if to reassure: "Hey, we may oppose current patterns of development, but we're not crazy no-growthers."
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