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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler on Wednesday asked the interstate agency that manages the fishing of Atlantic menhaden to increase protection for the fish, which scientists say is an integral part of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is considering updates to its management plan for the menhaden and Gansler submitted comments to the commission requesting that the threshold for overfishing be nearly doubled from the current rate. "The Commission's interstate fishery management plan … for the menhaden has so far failed to adequately protect the menhaden fishery, particularly from overfishing," Gansler said in his comments.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
A plan to reduce fishing for Atlantic menhaden along the East Coast moved ahead Wednesday, though the scale of the cutback came into question amid new doubts about how much overfishing has hurt the economically and ecologically important species. A panel of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, which regulates all inshore fishing from Maine to Florida, voted to seek public comment on whether to slash the commercial catch of menhaden by up to 50 percent, though it left the door open to making smaller cuts.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | December 30, 2008
Pollution and overharvesting in the Chesapeake Bay have devastated the blue crab population by killing crab feed and eroding key habitats, a leading environmental group said in report released yesterday. And, the group said, the federal government has failed to enforce environmental laws that would help remedy the problem.To prevent the dead zones that kill clams and worms that crabs eat and the algae blooms that kill crab habitats, the Environmental Protection Agency must impose a regulatory cap on the amount of pollution entering the bay and enforce the Clean Water Act, according to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's report.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 15, 2012
In a bit of good news for Maryland anglers, the federal government has declared the mid-Atlantic stock of summer flounder fully rebuilt after years of catch restrictions meant to curb overfishing. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's fisheries service reported to Congress Monday that a record six fish populations nationwide had been rebuilt last year to healthy levels.  Summer flounder is the only one in the mid-Atlantic. With those additions, the number of marine fish populations rebuilt in the past 11 years has grown to 27, NOAA said.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 15, 2012
In a bit of good news for Maryland anglers, the federal government has declared the mid-Atlantic stock of summer flounder fully rebuilt after years of catch restrictions meant to curb overfishing. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's fisheries service reported to Congress Monday that a record six fish populations nationwide had been rebuilt last year to healthy levels.  Summer flounder is the only one in the mid-Atlantic. With those additions, the number of marine fish populations rebuilt in the past 11 years has grown to 27, NOAA said.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 1997
WASHINGTON - The federal government has announced rules that will reduce some commercial shark fishing by half and impose new limits on recreational fishermen.With Atlantic shark populations at historically low levels because of overfishing and threats to their habitat, the rules by the National Marine Fisheries Service will affect about 150 commercial fishermen and thousands of recreational fishermen along the Atlantic coast primarily from Florida to North Carolina.For South Florida shark fishermen, the new regulations mean the first six-month shark fishing season will end about three months early at 11:30 p.m. on April 7, and will remain closed until the second season begins July 1.The rules set new limits on fishing for 39 species of sharks and bans intentional fishing for five species considered rare or vulnerable, including great white sharks made famous by the "Jaws" book and movies.
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By Tim Zink | May 27, 2001
WHILE HAND-lining with fatty bacon from a Patapsco River pier two decades ago, my grandfather grunted the same three-word command each time we netted a shimmering female crab. "Toss her back." My grandfather and the other old men on the pier intuitively knew that removing females from the Chesapeake Bay was especially damaging to the health of the overall blue crab population. In recent years, the Chesapeake crab population has plummeted, owing largely to pressure from overfishing. Recognizing the downward population trend, Gov. Parris N. Glendening implemented a comprehensive set of limits last month on this year's crab harvest.
NEWS
January 15, 1999
THE LATEST studies indicate the Chesapeake's blue crab population is in clear decline. Unfortunately, we've heard the same woeful assessments for years.Maryland imposed new limits on crabbing three years ago, cutting permitted fishing times and catches. The results were mixed: a spurt in the crab catch one season, a drop the next.Logically, the emphasis on curbing overfishing should have yielded an increase in crab numbers, given their short life span of two to four years. But commercial watermen have increased their efforts, within the rules, to take more of the shellfish.
NEWS
April 14, 1994
CONCERN that the supply of fish is being depleted is by no means confined to the Chesapeake Bay. It's a world problem, notes The Economist in a lead article. The international fish harvest peaked five years ago and has been slipping since. Twice as many boats are chasing fewer fish."The saddest thing about overfishing is that it is self-defeating," The Economist notes. "Left to themselves, fishermen will go on fishing until the contents of the net are worth less than the cost of putting the net in the sea."
NEWS
August 23, 2005
THE INDIVIDUAL waterman seems headed in the same direction as the family farmer and may well reach extinction first. Both are being done in by huge industrial-style competitors that benefit from economies of scale. In the case of the watermen, though, the damage is even greater because giant fishing concerns are also wiping out the product. In fact, the Bush administration has conceded the collapse of wild fish populations in U.S. coastal waters, with a proposal that fish farming be permitted in the zone from three miles to 200 miles offshore where most commercial fishermen have traditionally plied their trade.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
— "Sturgie" is biding his time, waiting to be introduced to the right female. Caught off Hooper's Island five years ago, the hulking six-foot Atlantic sturgeon passes his days lolling about in a large tank at the University of Maryland's Horn Point Environmental Laboratory near Cambridge. Scientists have been experimenting with him and dozens of other sturgeon here, trying to unlock the secrets of breeding them in captivity and ultimately restore a big, ancient fish that's virtually vanished from Maryland waters.
FEATURES
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler on Wednesday asked the interstate agency that manages the fishing of Atlantic menhaden to increase protection for the fish, which scientists say is an integral part of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is considering updates to its management plan for the menhaden and Gansler submitted comments to the commission requesting that the threshold for overfishing be nearly doubled from the current rate. "The Commission's interstate fishery management plan … for the menhaden has so far failed to adequately protect the menhaden fishery, particularly from overfishing," Gansler said in his comments.
NEWS
October 31, 2011
The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is on the threshold of making a game-changing decision: Whether to allow the menhaden in the Chesapeake Bay to be fished to extinction, or to act decisively to save this vital mid-chain food fish. Overfishing the Chesapeake Bay menhaden is exactly the kind of situation ASMFC is empowered to regulate by reducing commercial fishing takes or imposing moratoriums. The decimation of the bay's menhaden population to historic lows deals a severe blow to the area's entire symbiotic oceanic food chain.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
Equating the stocking of menhaden in Maryland's waters to a set of traffic lights, Mike Waine sees the current plight somewhere closer to red than green. Waine, the fisheries management coordinator for the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, said Tuesday's two-hour hearing in Annapolis helped gauge the public's view on the overfishing of menhaden — and the future management of the species. Once considered a delicacy, menhaden are now more highly regarded as the main forager of unwanted algae as well as a source of food for the region's striped bass population.
NEWS
April 13, 2010
No one is denying that the oyster population has decreased dramatically over the last 100 years, and no one is denying that the oyster population needs help, especially the watermen ("An oyster plan Maryland needs," April 8). To lay the blame for the lack of oysters on over-fishing by the watermen is irresponsible. The government is under pressure to do something about the oyster population and as usual they pick on the people that can least afford to fight them. That way, they can say they've done something about the problem, but the real causes and problems still exist.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | December 30, 2008
Pollution and overharvesting in the Chesapeake Bay have devastated the blue crab population by killing crab feed and eroding key habitats, a leading environmental group said in report released yesterday. And, the group said, the federal government has failed to enforce environmental laws that would help remedy the problem.To prevent the dead zones that kill clams and worms that crabs eat and the algae blooms that kill crab habitats, the Environmental Protection Agency must impose a regulatory cap on the amount of pollution entering the bay and enforce the Clean Water Act, according to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's report.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | August 26, 1993
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- In an ambiguous compromise that left some scratching their heads, officials from states along the Eastern Seaboard approved a plan yesterday that Maryland officials said could increase the state's fall rockfish season from 30 to 40 days.Maryland representatives at the meeting estimated the plan would increase the allowable catch of rockfish -- or striped bass -- by 700,000 pounds. But others in attendance weren't so sure."I'm not really clear where it's going," said William Goldsborough, a fisheries scientist with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.
NEWS
September 17, 2001
ONCE PUSHED to dangerously low levels, the Chesapeake Bay rockfish is more abundant now than anytime in the past three decades. This summer's survey by state scientists indicates a superior hatching season, the 10th straight year of healthy reproduction. It reflects the successful recovery of this important sport and commercial species, Maryland's state fish. The annual netting surveys, conducted for nearly 40 years, help Maryland and other states to manage the species. This year's high numbers of young could lead to calls for relaxing limits on the size and number of rockfish, or striped bass, that can be caught.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | September 22, 2007
Chesapeake Bay blue crabs are in serious danger of being over-fished this year and are not reproducing well enough to rebound from the kind of pressure being placed on them, Maryland natural resources officials say. Rather than impose regulations to deal with the possible crisis, the Department of Natural Resources is asking watermen for their help in figuring out a solution. Officials say they want to find a way to sustain a healthy population of the Maryland crustaceans and a robust crabbing industry, one of the state's last viable fisheries.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | February 14, 2007
Maryland's popular and lucrative spring striped bass season will be one week shorter and a bit more complicated for Chesapeake Bay anglers this year to prevent the overfishing of the past two years that raised the ire of regulators. The Department of Natural Resources is expected to receive permission from state lawmakers and the Atlantic State Marine Fisheries Commission for a season that substitutes a "slot" of 28 inches to 35 inches for a minimum-size restriction. The season will begin later, on April 21, which is expected to save 18,000 fish.
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