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NEWS
August 27, 1993
The fast-paced school reforms introduced over the past year by Baltimore County Superintendent Stuart Berger were enough throw a lot of residents for a loop. Many of them were further agitated by what they perceived to be the arrogant style of Dr. Berger and some of his top staffers. Then, when controversies erupted last spring over special-education inclusion and the demotions of principals, Dr. Berger became the most controversial public official the county, maybe this region, had seen in years.
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NEWS
June 21, 2014
Weeks after the attack in Benghazi, American reporters interviewed Ahmed Abu Khatallah at a cafe in Libya, so why did it take our government almost two years to capture him and why now on Fathers Day ( "Benghazi suspect was planning more attacks, U.S. tells U.N.," June 18)? It appears that he was hiding in plain sight. This is just another sign of how our government's leaders are not qualified to do the jobs they are elected or appointed to do. J. Heming, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 14, 1992
Aday on the presidential campaign trail:8 a.m. -- Addressing a breakfast meeting of the National Assn. of Librarians in Chicago, President Bush accuses Bill Clinton of holding a half-dozen overdue library books and of using an expired library card."
NEWS
May 23, 2014
Since October 2008, I have been calling on my colleagues in the House of Representatives to fix the unintended consequences associated with American satellite export regulations that treat all satellites and satellite parts - down to the nuts and bolts - as weapons. These outdated regulations known as the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, or "ITAR," have cost the industry an estimated $21 billion in lost revenues and 28,000 jobs a year to European companies that have long been marketing their products as "ITAR-free.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | January 27, 1992
THE WHOLE UGLY incident began with an attempt to return an overdue library book, which is never pleasant, let's face it.There was a time in this country when such a chore would not lead to a full-blown inquisition, but apparently those days are over.In any event, as soon as I handed the book to the former prison camp commandant behind the desk, her face seemed to harden."This book is overdue," she said icily.This was not news to me and yet I suddenly felt an overwhelming sense of contrition, particularly when she picked up a wooden ruler and began tapping it softly against her knuckles.
NEWS
January 29, 1997
Union Bridge officials are making progress in collecting overdue water and sewer bills.At 1995's end, 35 of the town's 380 accounts were in arrears for approximately $9,000. By the end of 1996, the town staff had cut overdue bills to five accounts in arrears for $1,900."They've worked hard to get accounts up to date," Councilman Selby M. Black, water and sewer committee chairman, reported at Monday's Town Council meeting.He praised Debra Rippeon, clerk, and Melissa Phelps, assistant clerk, for their work.
NEWS
August 3, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the St. Paul (Minn.) Pioneer Press, which was published Friday.THE presidential salary has not been raised since 1969, when it was set at $200,000.Legislation that would double the president's pay to $400,000 a year is pending in Congress now. The raise, which cannot go into effect until the next president takes office, is overdue and warranted.It would be a shame if the volatile politics of public sentiment and congressional whipsawing were to consume the logic of paying the president of the United States decently.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | May 23, 2005
ATLANTA - The hard-edged movement to roll back reproductive rights has dominated discussion of abortion in recent years - and for good reason. Abortion politics drives elections and is a powerful current rippling beneath the ongoing confrontation over President Bush's judicial nominees. But the focus on the absolutists around abortion has obscured one of the most heartening developments in American politics in recent years: Thoughtful leaders are beginning to coalesce around a movement to make abortion - in former President Bill Clinton's formulation - "safe, legal and rare."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 3, 1996
Today's little drama contains just enough mystery to invite the kind of speculation even humorless mugs find tempting and, ultimately, delicious. Today's question: What drives a man to return library books 22 years overdue, and to impose a stiff fine on himself?Sudden remorse? Sudden wealth? That Catholic guilt thing, brought on by too many viewings of "The Bells of St. Mary's"? Approaching death and a desire to clean the ledger? And who was this guy anyway? Bill Gates?Was he fulfilling penance ordered by a diocesan priest who'd heard the confession and thought Archbishop Spalding High could use a $3,200 donation?
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1999
Getting a jump on the holidays, dozens of Baltimore-area residents rushed to the rescue of a northeast Baltimore children's after-school program yesterday, paying the overdue $3,000 electric bill that threatened to close it.By midmorning, an anonymous donor had paid Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. for the five-month overdue bill after reading an account in The Sun yesterday about the fiscal woes of the Destiny of Hope center, which operates in an old warehouse...
NEWS
April 28, 2014
The Sun's "Checking on the coach" (April 23) editorial is probably the most ill-informed and misguided piece of commentary you have ever published. For starters, the cost to perform a background check on youth sport coaches and volunteers was greatly exaggerated. Also, the editors of The Sun expressed concern about "sticking" local recreation councils with the bill when Baltimore County already does that on too many fronts to count. It is also concerning that Council Chairwoman Cathy Bevins was "shocked" to discover that background checks were not required within Baltimore County and that The Sun is currently advising the council to wait on taking action.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
More than 300 people banned from owning guns were able to buy them last year because the state police were overwhelmed with background check requests, police said Wednesday. People with histories of mental illness or convictions for violent misdemeanors, felons and fugitives were able to obtain and keep guns for three months or longer before state police reviewed the sales, according to records released by request to The Baltimore Sun. Maryland State Police finally cleared the backlog of background-check requests last week that began more than a year ago and once stood at more than 60,000, leading to months-long delays in investigating thousands of firearm transactions.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | April 3, 2014
The Harford County public school system included seven days in the academic calendar this school year as potential makeup days in case of snow. Turns out, the school system ended up canceling classes 11 times (or 12 if the state doesn't allow the two and a half hour day to count), which means if the school year ends on June 12, Harford County students will not have attended classes for the requisite 180 days required by state standards. The school system, therefore, has requested a waiver from the Maryland State Board of Education, which has authorized the state superintendent to grant or deny such waivers.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Baltimore's Housing Authority is selling nearly 40 percent of its public housing to private developers under a national model designed to raise millions for upgrades and maintenance, Commissioner Paul T. Graziano said Wednesday. Beginning next year, 22 complexes will undergo $300 million in long-overdue upgrades, such as roof replacements, new elevators and heating systems, and remodeled kitchens and bathrooms, Graziano said. The proposal expects to use multiple funding sources, including tax credits which are made available by the state of Maryland through the U.S. Department of the Treasury.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 24, 2013
Baltimore city , Baltimore County and Prince George's County have been directed by the state to step up their efforts to reduce polluted runoff fouling local streams and the Chesapeake Bay. But environmental groups contend the mandates are too vague and weak, raising the possibility they may go to court to challenge them. The Maryland Department of the Environment ordered the three large jurisdictions to take a variety of similar actions over the next five years to curtail storm-water pollution, including reducing litter in water ways and retrofitting 20 percent of their streets, parking lots and buildings to catch or treat runoff.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | October 23, 2013
Attorney General has paid an overdue speeding ticket issued by a District of Columbia  speed camera after repeated delays drove the cost to $400, according to multiple media reports. Gansler issued a statement Tuesday saying he had paid the ticket himself even  though he says the identity of who was driving his state-issued vehicle at the time of the violation has not been determined. The ticket was issued in June 2012 for going 21 to 25 mph over the speed limit,  WBAL reported.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2003
Baltimore officials expect thousands of people to line up today and tomorrow to pay their overdue parking tickets during a two-day amnesty on late penalties. Drivers will be required to pay the original fine and any fees for booting, towing, storage of impounded vehicles, bad checks or court costs, according to city officials. Late penalties will be waived. In anticipation of the crowds at the Abel Wolman Municipal Building, 200 Holliday St., the city is closing Holliday Street from Saratoga to Lexington streets today and tomorrow, city officials said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff PbB | January 14, 1992
A long overdue blast of winter weather bore down on Maryland today, bringing thunderstorms, wind gusts in excess of 60 mph, falling temperatures and snow late today to Western Maryland.The National Weather Service said 3 to 6 inches of snow was possible in the extreme western portions of the state late today in the wake of a cold front moving across Maryland, dropping temperatures out of the 50s and 60s toward the teens tonight.For central Maryland, the clash of cold, arctic air to the west and warm tropical air pushing up from the south brought downpours and thunderstorms, with winds increasing as the colder air approached.
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