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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
Linda Fletcher lives in fear of reliving a nightmare: a son dying from a heroin overdose. Her son Kris Klipner succumbed to the drug in 2007. He was 28. Klipner's half-brother battles the same kind of depression as Kris. He suffers the same heroin addiction Kris did. Kirk Fletcher, 29, is in a methadone program to help him avoid the drug. He says he has his addiction under control. But he understands his mother's fear that it will return - just as his brother's did. Linda Fletcher is hopeful that some relief is on the way. New legislation, pushed by Fletcher and other parents, backed by the state health department and passed unanimously this year by both chambers of the Maryland General Assembly, creates a statewide program allowing family members of addicts to be prescribed and trained in administering Naloxone.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2013
Annapolis police have released the names of a shooting victim and two men who died of suspected drug overdoses on Sunday, all three of whom appeared to be from Calvert County. Police believe John Donnel Ray, 32, of the 4600 block of Rolling Hill Road, Huntingtown, was shot in his car in the 200 block of Victor Parkway, according to Detective Richard Truitt. He was found dead in the vehicle. He said detectives think there may be witnesses to the crime. Anyone with information is asked to call Detective Charles Bealefeld at 443-986-5561.
NEWS
By Ellen Weber, Andrea Gielen and G. Caleb Alexander | February 25, 2013
With epidemic rates of prescription opioid and heroin deaths in Maryland, families are demanding easier access to the antidote that could save the lives of their loved ones. Naloxone is used safely to reverse the effects of heroin and prescription opioid medications. Emergency medical technicians administer naloxone when they respond to an overdose emergency. All too often, however, these emergency responders do not arrive in time. State law bars family members and friends who may be in the best position to save the life of a person experiencing an overdose from obtaining a prescription for naloxone in their own name and administering this medication in an emergency.
NEWS
By Grant Smith | August 27, 2012
For all the attention that violent crime gets in the media, the average American is much more likely to die from another largely preventable tragedy. Fatal drug overdoses have risen sharply in recent years. In Congress this month, Maryland Rep. Donna F. Edwards introduced bipartisan legislation known as the Stop Overdose Stat (S.O.S.) Act to help reverse this national trend. Every year, the lives of more than 28,000 Americans and more than 200 Baltimore City residents are claimed by a drug overdose.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
De'Andre L. McCullough, the young protagonist of the book “The Corner”, which chronicled a year on a drug-plagued street corner in West Baltimore and was turned into an HBO miniseries, died Wednesday of an apparent overdose in Baltimore County, according to police and relatives. It marked the end of a long struggle with addiction for McCullough, 35, who showed promise of getting his life on track but was being sought at the time of his death on warrants charging him with two armed robberies at Baltimore pharmacies, police said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
As thousands of late-night revelers partied to thumping electronic dance music in the graffiti-marked remains of an old fort in Baltimore last month, some overdosed on drugs or became overwhelmed by the heat, according to a report by the city fire marshal. While the overnight Starscape festival at Fort Armistead Park stretched into the early-morning hours, emergency medical crews from the city and Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties struggled to keep up with calls for help from the venue, responding to the park "continuously" for 12 hours, the report says.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for increasing clouds and a high temperature near 90 degrees. Tonight is expected to be cloudy, with a 60 percent chance of rain and a low temperature around 73 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM THE WEEKEND... Rawlings-Blake names panel to look for Bealefeld replacement : The mayor's office said the panel will conduct interviews of internal and external applicants and recommend finalists to Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
June 11, 2012
The decision of the state medical examiner to rule the overdose death of a 24-year-old heroin addict as a homicide has rekindled questions about whether city and state officials are routinely under-reporting Baltimore's number of annual murders. Homicide statistics are generally considered to be a reliable measure of crime simply because they leave so little room for interpretation, but as the case of Amber Brown illustrates, there is still judgment involved. Circuit Court Clerk Frank Conaway and others have long argued that many of the city's overdose deaths should be considered homicides if we are to get a true picture of Baltimore's problems.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2012
Amber Brown, 24, was complaining of chest pains the night police say she and her girlfriend drank alcohol and injected each other with heroin in their Northeast Baltimore apartment. Brown passed out and never woke up; her companion could face criminal charges. Brown's death was not unlike hundreds of others each year in Maryland from drug overdoses, but it is the only one in recent memory to be ruled a homicide. Because authorities rarely find witnesses, the medical examiner frequently labels such deaths "undetermined," a distinction that has led to debate over whether deaths in Maryland, including homicides, are being counted accurately.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
The state medical examiner's office has taken the rare step of classifying a 24-year-old woman's recent drug overdose death as a homicide, one of several recent killings being investigated by Baltimore detectives. Though there are hundreds of drug overdoses each year in Baltimore, investigators typically have little insight into the circumstances surrounding such cases. As such, the medical examiner's office declines to assign a manner of death, leading the state to have a high rate of deaths deemed “undetermined.” “If someone injects a toxic substance into somebody and kills them, everybody would call that a homicide,” said David Fowler, the state's chief medical examiner.
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