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NEWS
By Ellen Weber, Andrea Gielen and G. Caleb Alexander | February 25, 2013
With epidemic rates of prescription opioid and heroin deaths in Maryland, families are demanding easier access to the antidote that could save the lives of their loved ones. Naloxone is used safely to reverse the effects of heroin and prescription opioid medications. Emergency medical technicians administer naloxone when they respond to an overdose emergency. All too often, however, these emergency responders do not arrive in time. State law bars family members and friends who may be in the best position to save the life of a person experiencing an overdose from obtaining a prescription for naloxone in their own name and administering this medication in an emergency.
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HEALTH
Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A database in Kentucky that has tracked potentially dangerous and addictive prescriptions dispensed in the state for the past 15 years has become a national model by helping significantly reduce so-called doctor-shopping for pain drugs. Federal data show the state has dropped from the second-highest abuser of prescription drugs such as OxyContin and Percocet to 31st. But what it and other states cannot show is that such programs cut down on overdose deaths from all legal and illegal drugs, a lesson not lost on Maryland as its joins every other state in launching its own prescription drug monitoring system.
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SPORTS
By From Sun news services | November 26, 2009
The Kitsap County (Washington) coroner said Tony Fein , who was a member of the Ravens during the preseason, died of an accidental drug overdose. Coroner Greg Sandstrom said Wednesday that toxicology tests showed "acute opiate [morphine] intoxication" with the added effect of Alprazolam, a drug used to treat anxiety. Sandstrom says Fein also vomited and aspirated that material. Fein collapsed Oct. 6 at a friend's house near Port Orchard and died at Harrison Medical Center in Bremerton.
NEWS
Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
Robert Taylor Jr., and Camille Haviland thought they were being safe - within the bounds of their dangerous heroin habit, that is. Having bought from a new dealer, Taylor tried just one capsule instead of his usual three or four. Haviland left on an errand; when she returned 15 minutes later, she found him collapsed on the ground, bluish and not breathing. She started CPR. When paramedics arrived, they injected Taylor with the overdose-reversing drug, naloxone. "At the time, I would have liked to have had this," Haviland said recently after she and Taylor were trained and certified to administer the drug themselves.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2013
Annapolis police have released the names of a shooting victim and two men who died of suspected drug overdoses on Sunday, all three of whom appeared to be from Calvert County. Police believe John Donnel Ray, 32, of the 4600 block of Rolling Hill Road, Huntingtown, was shot in his car in the 200 block of Victor Parkway, according to Detective Richard Truitt. He was found dead in the vehicle. He said detectives think there may be witnesses to the crime. Anyone with information is asked to call Detective Charles Bealefeld at 443-986-5561.
NEWS
June 11, 2012
The decision of the state medical examiner to rule the overdose death of a 24-year-old heroin addict as a homicide has rekindled questions about whether city and state officials are routinely under-reporting Baltimore's number of annual murders. Homicide statistics are generally considered to be a reliable measure of crime simply because they leave so little room for interpretation, but as the case of Amber Brown illustrates, there is still judgment involved. Circuit Court Clerk Frank Conaway and others have long argued that many of the city's overdose deaths should be considered homicides if we are to get a true picture of Baltimore's problems.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
A 17-year-old Woodbridge, Va., boy died Sunday evening of an apparent overdose, the second drug fatality following a Merriweather Post Pavilion concert on Friday, Howard County police said. The teen, whom police did not identify at the request of his family, was one of 20 hospitalized after the "Mad Decent Block Party" music festival at the Columbia venue. Authorities identified the man who died Saturday as Tyler Fox Viscardi, 20, of Raleigh, N.C. Police do not believe the two knew each other.
NEWS
September 11, 1991
Baltimore police are investigating an alleged heroin party that resulted in the overdose deaths of a man and a woman, whose bodies were found at two different times in the same house yesterday.The bodies of the victims, both unidentified, were found at a home in the first block of North Rose Street in East Baltimore. When police were called to the house yesterday at 7 a.m., they discovered the body of the man. They were called to the scene a second time, at 3:18 p.m., when a woman's body was found.
NEWS
June 23, 1994
ST. MARGARETS -- Vickie Lynee Hippler, whose body was found outside the defunct Dick Gessner's Broadway Corner dinner theater on June 8, died of an overdose of heroin, cocaine and alcohol, according to toxicology tests released yesterday by the state medical examiner.An autopsy of Ms. Hippler's body conducted the day after she was found did not determine a cause of death, said Officer Randy Bell, spokesman for the Anne Arundel County police.County homicide detectives have ruled the death accidental and have closed the investigation, Officer Bell said.
NEWS
By Michael James and David Michael Ettlin and Michael James and David Michael Ettlin,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writers Joanna Daemmrich and Richard Irwin contributed to this article | April 15, 1994
Indicted Baltimore Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean apparently attempted suicide with an overdose of prescription pills last night, leaving a two-page handwritten note for her husband that apologized for causing him troubles, police said.Mrs. McLean was taken to Union Memorial Hospital by ambulance shortly before 10 p.m. from their luxury condominium apartment at the Colonnade on Canterbury Road in North Baltimore, police said.She was listed in critical but stable condition early today, a hospital spokeswoman said.
NEWS
Deanna Wilson, Stephanie Sparrow and Jennifer Kirschner | August 29, 2014
Last year, 858 Maryland residents died due to alcohol or drug intoxication; that's enough to replace the entire University of Maryland football team more than eight times. This year is on track to be even more deadly, with a 33 percent increase in accidental opioid overdose deaths recorded in the first three months of 2014 alone. We do not want any more families, friends and communities to grieve their fallen loved ones. It is time for all of us to call this problem what is: an epidemic.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
A 17-year-old Woodbridge, Va., boy died Sunday evening of an apparent overdose, the second drug fatality following a Merriweather Post Pavilion concert on Friday, Howard County police said. The teen, whom police did not identify at the request of his family, was one of 20 hospitalized after the "Mad Decent Block Party" music festival at the Columbia venue. Authorities identified the man who died Saturday as Tyler Fox Viscardi, 20, of Raleigh, N.C. Police do not believe the two knew each other.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
A North Carolina man died and more than 20 others were hospitalized after apparent drug overdoses Friday at a concert at the Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia, Howard County police said. One teen was in critical condition. Police said Tyler Fox Viscardi, 20, of Raleigh, N.C., was rushed from the all-day Mad Decent Block Party concert to Howard County General Hospital around 9 p.m. and was pronounced dead shortly after. Police said his death appeared to result from a drug overdose, but officials have not determined what drugs he took.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
An alarming spike in heroin and other drug overdose deaths in Maryland has prompted what the state's health secretary calls an "all hands on deck" effort to investigate and treat addiction. The number of drug- and alcohol-related deaths in Maryland rose to 858 in 2013 from 799 the previous year, according to data released by the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on Friday. Much of the increase is due to heroin, particularly when it is laced with fentanyl, a powerful prescription painkiller used by cancer and other patients, now being illicitly manufactured in drug labs, said Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, the department's secretary.
NEWS
By Nina Miller | June 4, 2014
In March, Anne Arundel County was the first county in Maryland to put the powerful, lifesaving drug naloxone in the hands of its police officers. Naloxone is a safe and effective prescription medicine that reverses an opioid overdose. It can be administered via a simple nasal spray device. Emergency medical professionals have used it for decades, and recently more and more police departments across the country are equipping their officers with the skills and supplies necessary to administer this lifesaving treatment to people suffering from an opioid overdose.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Anne Arundel County has seen heroin overdoses at a rate of more than one a day so far in 2014, and on Monday officials said they're putting a powerful drug in the hands of police officers in hopes of saving lives. Officers are being trained to administer a nasal mist known as Narcan, or naloxone, a drug designed to halt overdose symptoms in heroin users. Twelve people have died of heroin overdoses in the county so far this year. "It's truly a lifesaving tool that officers can carry in the field," said Sgt. Daniel Sereboff, a county police trainer and emergency medical technician.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH | April 9, 2006
The Westminster woman whose body state police discovered in an Eldersburg creek on March 22 died of an overdose of drugs and alcohol, according to an autopsy by the chief medical examiner's office in Baltimore. State police do not suspect foul play nor do they believe the overdose was intentional, said Greg Shipley, a state police spokesman. The woman, Janet L. Seal, 44, of the first block of Pennsylvania Ave., was pronounced dead at the scene near the 1700 block of Bennett Road.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
Deaths from alcohol and drug overdoses declined for the second straight year in Baltimore and are at their lowest level since 1995, when the city began recording the data, according to a Health Department report released today. In 2008, 176 people died of a drug overdose in Baltimore, compared with 281 in 2007, a decrease of about one-third. Baltimore health officials called the figures significant and noted that they come at a time when overdose rates in other cities are climbing. They said increased treatment slots, better outreach to addicts and a five-year-old program that teaches drug abusers how to avoid overdosing themselves have contributed to the decline.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
A rash of overdose deaths from heroin laced with a powerful synthetic opiate has drawn a high-profile reaction from law enforcement and public-health officials, who are scrambling to find the source of the drugs and warn addicts of the danger. Thirty-seven people in Maryland have died after using the fentanyl-laced heroin since September. The cases represented one-tenth of more than 300 reported drug overdoses in that time, according to state health officials. But a rising trend of heroin-linked fatalities has been on the radar for years.
NEWS
February 6, 2014
Why are we wasting law enforcement resources on people who are trying to kill themselves, quickly or slowly? Is there some government law that governs the purity of heroin ( "A fatal addiction," Feb. 4)? Use the energy and people to prevent and solve the violent crimes against innocent people. Obviously, insufficient resources are being utilized in that fight. Thomas F. McDonough, Towson - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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