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NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | January 20, 1995
After all these years, I have discovered a hidden benefit in doing this job.It came in a letter from a nice lady who lives in Arizona.She had read an old column about my wife's disgust with my winter overcoat, which is 17 years old and has threads hanging from the sleeves and collar, mud and soot stains, missing buttons, and holes from cigarette burns.Other than that, though, the coat is structurally sound and fends off the wind as well as it did the day I bought it.And it doesn't smell bad, except in the summer, when I don't wear it anyway.
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NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun Reporter | January 29, 2007
A West Baltimore man was arrested yesterday and charged with robbing an off-duty city police officer a week ago while pointing a handgun at the head of her daughter, city police reported. The suspect was identified as Edward Williams, 40, whose last known address was in the 700 block of N. Carrollton Ave. - the block where the officer was accosted Jan. 22 as she was taking her child to day care, police said. Williams was arrested by Western District officers on charges of armed robbery, assault and related offenses.
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FEATURES
By Fritz Lanham and Fritz Lanham,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | January 19, 2000
Three familiar names have swept the most prestigious awards for children's literature. Christopher Paul Curtis won the John Newbery Medal for "Bud, Not Buddy." His first novel, "The Watsons Go to Birmingham -- 1963," had been named a Newbery Honor Book for 1995. Simms Taback, also a previous Honor Book winner, received the Randolph Caldecott Medal, given for best picture book, for "Joseph Had a Little Overcoat." And Walter Dean Myers, among the best-known and most-feted authors of books for older children, won the first Michael L. Printz Award for his novel "Monster" (HarperCollins)
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | January 11, 2007
It used to bother him when he'd step on stage and see hardly any black faces in the crowd. But Regan Farquhar, better known as underground rapper Busdriver, has long gotten over the fact that folks who look like him don't generally dig his twisted, highly idiosyncratic style of hip-hop. "I'm hard-pressed to find anybody black at my shows," he says. "Black people have moved on. In the early '90s, they were there. But the industry itself is gearing black people to subscribe to whatever mainstream rap is out there.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | February 3, 1995
I don't remember looking forward to the mail delivery as much as I have the last week.Every day promises to be as exciting as Christmas morning or an Easter egg hunt.It began when a nice widow lady in Arizona read about my wife's disgust with my old winter overcoat, a frayed, soiled, grungy garment I have worn for many years.In the nice lady's closet was a splendid blue-black wool overcoat -- virtually new -- that had belonged to her late husband.She said she wanted me to have the coat because her husband had been a fine man and she thought that I was too.It fit perfectly, and my wife and co-workers said I had never worn a coat that made me look so successful and dignified.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun Reporter | January 29, 2007
A West Baltimore man was arrested yesterday and charged with robbing an off-duty city police officer a week ago while pointing a handgun at the head of her daughter, city police reported. The suspect was identified as Edward Williams, 40, whose last known address was in the 700 block of N. Carrollton Ave. - the block where the officer was accosted Jan. 22 as she was taking her child to day care, police said. Williams was arrested by Western District officers on charges of armed robbery, assault and related offenses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | January 11, 2007
It used to bother him when he'd step on stage and see hardly any black faces in the crowd. But Regan Farquhar, better known as underground rapper Busdriver, has long gotten over the fact that folks who look like him don't generally dig his twisted, highly idiosyncratic style of hip-hop. "I'm hard-pressed to find anybody black at my shows," he says. "Black people have moved on. In the early '90s, they were there. But the industry itself is gearing black people to subscribe to whatever mainstream rap is out there.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 25, 2003
IT WAS so cold this week that instead of merely walking their dogs, shivering pet owners all around town could be seen sprinting with their pooches between fire plugs. It was so cold that smokers, exiled to puff outside buildings, considered consolidating their breaks, lighting up back-to-back cigarettes to keep their time in the cold to a minimum. It was so cold that my car whined something that sounded like "Noooooooo" as I turned it over in the morning. This sound of distress probably came from a failing starter.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | November 29, 1991
AS THIS column reported last summer, the American press is waging a sly attack against the well-dressed man. At that time we disclosed the plot to destroy the good character of the suit.The smear campaign against the suit -- that grand old foundation of the American male's wardrobe -- aims to associate it exclusively with unspeakable people. Because RussellBakerthis column believes in the suit and hates to see a great traditional American garment badly treated, whether by incompetent dry-cleaners or a sneering press, we have stayed with the story.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1997
Don't believe Bryan Stark, 31, when he says he dresses like the "stereotypical ad guy." Sure, he favors bright ties and suspenders, but the vice president of client services at the Reeves Agency puts it all together in a refreshing and not not-too-deadly-earnest way, impressing clients and colleagues.Which came first, the look or the career?My mother worked for a large, worldwide global ad agency on the West Coast. She always liked how the account guys dressed, so I think ever since the age of when I could wear a suit or a tie, she bought me bold ties and suspenders.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Lem Satterfield and Joe Christensen and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2005
Vowing to win over Baltimore's fans, Sammy Sosa arrived in town last night, ready to be introduced today as the newest Oriole. "It's a great place for me to come here and win the crowd like I'm going to do and be happy again," Sosa told The Sun last night. "I like the situation in Baltimore. They have a great ballpark. I think I'll be perfect here." The podium at Camden Yards is ready, and the Orioles hope Sosa will be standing there, sometime today, flashing his thousand-watt smile. Today, he will undergo a thorough physical examination and, assuming everything checks out, the Orioles plan to introduce him as their first major acquisition of the offseason.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 21, 2004
THAT WIND blustering through East Baltimore yesterday was strong enough to make street signs rattle up and down Broadway. On Rutland Avenue, a woman shuffled along with a big woolly blanket bundled around her. On Ashland Avenue, four little children held each other's hands, as though worried they might take flight. Maybe, if we're lucky, that wind will start blowing away the history of the last 30 years of this troubled neighborhood just north of Johns Hopkins Hospital. Yesterday looked like a turning point.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 25, 2003
IT WAS so cold this week that instead of merely walking their dogs, shivering pet owners all around town could be seen sprinting with their pooches between fire plugs. It was so cold that smokers, exiled to puff outside buildings, considered consolidating their breaks, lighting up back-to-back cigarettes to keep their time in the cold to a minimum. It was so cold that my car whined something that sounded like "Noooooooo" as I turned it over in the morning. This sound of distress probably came from a failing starter.
FEATURES
By Fritz Lanham and Fritz Lanham,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | January 19, 2000
Three familiar names have swept the most prestigious awards for children's literature. Christopher Paul Curtis won the John Newbery Medal for "Bud, Not Buddy." His first novel, "The Watsons Go to Birmingham -- 1963," had been named a Newbery Honor Book for 1995. Simms Taback, also a previous Honor Book winner, received the Randolph Caldecott Medal, given for best picture book, for "Joseph Had a Little Overcoat." And Walter Dean Myers, among the best-known and most-feted authors of books for older children, won the first Michael L. Printz Award for his novel "Monster" (HarperCollins)
NEWS
By James H. Bready | June 6, 1997
IT WAS THE YEAR Roger Maris was passing Babe Ruth, the year the Orioles, thanks to Jim Gentile and Steve Barber, were having their first 90-victories season. But I was, as usual, lost in the great long ago. Not good, that so many of baseball's old-timers were dying off, uninterviewed.I had been to see Lefty Grove, Max Bishop, Jack Bentley, Merwin Jacobson, Fritz Maisel, Tommy Thomas: Seven-Straighters all, stalwarts on Jack Dunn's 1919-1925 championship teams. Often, they mentioned that effective, erratic Oriole pitcher Rube Parnham; recalling, for instance, how in the long evenings of daylight baseball Rube, in his rattletrap roadster, liked to tour the speaks of Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1997
Don't believe Bryan Stark, 31, when he says he dresses like the "stereotypical ad guy." Sure, he favors bright ties and suspenders, but the vice president of client services at the Reeves Agency puts it all together in a refreshing and not not-too-deadly-earnest way, impressing clients and colleagues.Which came first, the look or the career?My mother worked for a large, worldwide global ad agency on the West Coast. She always liked how the account guys dressed, so I think ever since the age of when I could wear a suit or a tie, she bought me bold ties and suspenders.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | June 6, 1997
IT WAS THE YEAR Roger Maris was passing Babe Ruth, the year the Orioles, thanks to Jim Gentile and Steve Barber, were having their first 90-victories season. But I was, as usual, lost in the great long ago. Not good, that so many of baseball's old-timers were dying off, uninterviewed.I had been to see Lefty Grove, Max Bishop, Jack Bentley, Merwin Jacobson, Fritz Maisel, Tommy Thomas: Seven-Straighters all, stalwarts on Jack Dunn's 1919-1925 championship teams. Often, they mentioned that effective, erratic Oriole pitcher Rube Parnham; recalling, for instance, how in the long evenings of daylight baseball Rube, in his rattletrap roadster, liked to tour the speaks of Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Lem Satterfield and Joe Christensen and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2005
Vowing to win over Baltimore's fans, Sammy Sosa arrived in town last night, ready to be introduced today as the newest Oriole. "It's a great place for me to come here and win the crowd like I'm going to do and be happy again," Sosa told The Sun last night. "I like the situation in Baltimore. They have a great ballpark. I think I'll be perfect here." The podium at Camden Yards is ready, and the Orioles hope Sosa will be standing there, sometime today, flashing his thousand-watt smile. Today, he will undergo a thorough physical examination and, assuming everything checks out, the Orioles plan to introduce him as their first major acquisition of the offseason.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 6, 1995
Mostly flattering, sometimes demeaning, always amusing -- so I describe the many articles that have been written about Baltimore by out-of-townies. Travel writers come through here now and then, posing as literary tourists slumming in the gritty mid-Atlantic. We should be grateful that they even bother. This ,, year Baltimore has had two write-ups in the New York Times and -- la-dee-dah, hon! -- one of them was published in the Sophisticated Traveler Sunday supplement.By now, there have been hundreds of "travel guides to Charm City" published in magazines and newspapers, most of them since our legendary Baltimore Renaissance.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | February 3, 1995
I don't remember looking forward to the mail delivery as much as I have the last week.Every day promises to be as exciting as Christmas morning or an Easter egg hunt.It began when a nice widow lady in Arizona read about my wife's disgust with my old winter overcoat, a frayed, soiled, grungy garment I have worn for many years.In the nice lady's closet was a splendid blue-black wool overcoat -- virtually new -- that had belonged to her late husband.She said she wanted me to have the coat because her husband had been a fine man and she thought that I was too.It fit perfectly, and my wife and co-workers said I had never worn a coat that made me look so successful and dignified.
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