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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 7, 2007
You know it is the dead of winter when your weeknight entertainment is playing with cauliflower. That is how I recently spent a few nights. One evening, I pressed a crown of blue cheese and bread crumbs onto a head of roasted cauliflower. Another night, my diversion consisted of slicing the vegetable into pieces, cooking them with curry and yogurt, then tossing on cilantro and lime juice. Finally, for kicks, I took a cauliflower apart, cooked it and put it back together upside down. Then, in a real showstopping move, I flipped it over so it appeared on the table whole and right side up. These endeavors entertained me -- but as should be apparent by now, I am easily amused, especially during these dark months.
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NEWS
November 29, 2006
Asparagus Steamed in a Paper Bag Serves 4 1 pound medium asparagus, tough ends trimmed extra-virgin olive oil sea salt and cracked pepper 1/2 lemon, sliced paper-thin 1 bay leaf Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and arrange an oven rack in the middle of the oven. Get yourself a paper bag large enough to hold the asparagus comfortably. Throw the asparagus in there and drizzle the outside of the bag with olive oil to keep the bag from burning. Sprinkle the asparagus with sea salt and cracked pepper and toss in the lemon slices and bay leaf.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | November 22, 2006
What can I do tonight to get ready for Thanksgiving tomorrow? The first thing you should do on Thanksgiving Eve is to make two lists: one, a menu that enumerates every single thing that you plan to serve, along with the appropriate sauces, dressings and garnishes; the other detailing every nonculinary task that needs to be done, from bringing the folding chairs in from the garage to tidying up the bathroom. Post the menu in a prominent place, so that you don't realize while clearing dessert that you forgot to serve the salad.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | August 30, 2006
Some dishes turn your head with their texture; others win you over with their looks. This one grabbed me with its aroma. I was up on the third floor of our rowhouse when I caught my first whiff, a compelling mixture of tomatoes, peppers and onions. I quickly made my way down the stairs, inhaling my way toward the first-floor oven where the dish was baking. At the kitchen door I picked up scents of garlic. "Wow," I said to my wife who was working in the kitchen, "whatever that is, it smells wonderful."
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
WYE ISLAND-- --Directionally, Fran Gower's pineapple upside-down cake is a success. Aesthetically, however, it's four rings shy of dessert. Not to worry, says Gower, as she scurries around the campfire from the Dutch oven to her portable pantry sitting near a stump. With a quick twist of a can opener and a few pokes with a fork, Gower replaces the charred pineapple rings with unblemished ones. If the 11 guests at her camp site - fresh from a kayaking trip - know about the touch-up job, they never let on. And that, says Gower with a smile, is what camp cooking is all about.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 2006
Charlene Young of Bend, Ore., was looking for a recipe she used to have for "oven porcupines," which were meatballs made with a combination of ground meats and rice. Jamie Mansperger of Phoenix sent in a recipe that she has been using for more than 20 years. She said that she used to prepare them for her children and serve them with mashed potatoes and a green salad. Mansperger's recipe is for baked meatballs that are made using a classic meatloaf mix of beef, pork and veal. It was quick and easy to prepare and unlike other versions I received, you do not have to go to the trouble of browning the meatballs first.
NEWS
February 22, 2006
The oven temperature was omitted from the Basic Muffin Recipe in the Feb. 8 Taste section. The muffins should be baked at 350 degrees. The Sun regrets the error.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 31, 2005
Late in the year, journalists like to weigh in on the big national and international stories of the past 12 months. Not me. I will leave it to others in my craft to analyze whether the powers that be should have been tapping phones, opening the wilderness up to oil exploration or getting more seasoned slingers on the mound at Camden Yards. I'll concentrate on what happened on the home front. For me, 2005 will be remembered as the year we lived with a dormant doorbell. The doorbell went into a quiescent state, along with other conveniences in our lives, around mid-May.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD AND BRITTANY BAUHAUS and LIZ ATWOOD AND BRITTANY BAUHAUS,SUN REPORTERS | November 23, 2005
You say you're too busy to put together a Thanksgiving meal from scratch? After all, tomorrow is the day and you haven't even baked a pie. Well, you may have good reasons not to cook a traditional Thanksgiving dinner, but time shouldn't be one of them. Although all the books tell you to begin preparations days in advance, the biggest meal of the year really can be made in just a few hours. If you shop today, you can watch the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in the morning and still have turkey and all the trimmings ready before the kickoff of the Dallas-Denver football game at 4 p.m. "It's definitely workable," says Tom Schwarzweller, executive chef at Wegmans in Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | November 2, 2005
Is there any way to get day-old bagels to taste as fresh at home as they do when they come straight from the bakery? You can come pretty close. First, there is the matter of storage. When I buy bagels, I store the day's ration in a loosely closed paper bag at room temperature. I put the rest into a large resealable plastic bag, suck out the air using a plastic drinking straw, seal and freeze. To rejuvenate a frozen bagel, take it out of the freezer an hour or so before you want to eat it. Preheat your oven or toaster oven to 400 degrees.
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