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By ROB KASPER | December 12, 2007
As the days get darker, I get hungrier for potatoes. I am not sure why. Perhaps it has something to do with my diurnal rhythm. When the night is cold and scary, I tend to stay indoors and seek warm and comforting potatoes. Moreover, to cook potatoes you need a strong fire. A hot oven is a welcome companion when the sky turns to pitch at 5 p.m. and the north winds rattle the windows. It could be that my increased appetite for potatoes is linked to some instinct to burrow, to avoid the bitter outdoors by retreating deep into the familiarity of the kitchen and eating things grown underground.
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NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 17, 2007
Michael DePasquale Jr. has three pugs, and pugs like to eat, so naturally -- he says -- he named his new coal-fired pizzeria in Perry Hall Phat Pug (8841A Bel Air Road). As far as I know, it's the area's first and only pizza cooked in a coal oven, which produces a hotter fire and a crispier crust. People seem to love it. DePasquale, flush with the success of his new venture, says he's going to expand "from here to Miami." He's already started, with plans to open Phat Pugs in Federal Hill on Fort Avenue and Fells Point, either on Thames Street or off Broadway, in the next couple of months.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | October 3, 2007
Could you suggest the best methods to ensure that my cakes unmold without crumbling? I can offer a few suggestions: Get an oven thermometer. Most home ovens run as much as 50 degrees high or low. If the temperature is too high, the cake may overbake and get dry. Learn how to check for doneness. Doneness indicators vary by recipe (a cheescake shows different signs from a devil's food cake). But for most butter-based cakes, a toothpick inserted in the middle should come out clean, the cake should pull away from the edges, and the top should spring back when you touch it lightly.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | September 26, 2007
Kitchen Playdates By Lauren Bank Deen The Everything Kids' Gross Cookbook By Colleen Sell and Melinda Sell Frank Adams Media / 2007 / $7.95 How do you get kids to not only eat their veggies, but cook them, too? A side order of yuck. Appealing to the preteen who loves to get grossed out, this books sells a casserole of creamed corn and frozen mixed vegetables by calling it Puke au Gratin. Buttered spinach linguine becomes Gangrenous Intestines. As a grown-up, I'm too disgusted to read much more.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | August 29, 2007
Don't worry if the rain washes away your grilling plans. This pork tenderloin recipe easily transfers to cooking indoors. Sear the meat in a hot skillet, then roast quickly in a hot oven to cook the meat through. Pork tenderloins are small enough for fast cooking. Of course, this recipe works very well on the grill. Bill Daley writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Curried Pork Tenderloins Makes 6 servings -- Total time: 36 minutes 2 pork tenderloins, about 1 pound each 3 tablespoons curry powder or a spice rub 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 lime wedge Heat oven to 375 degrees.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | August 12, 2007
Life isn't much fun when your dogs are barking - the ones below your ankles that keep your legs from unraveling. Sole Custom Footbeds has come up with a line of shoe footbeds that conform to your foot after you warm them up in the oven. The inserts range in support from the "signature series," for the hard-core adventurer, to the "slim series" for everyday use. Prices start at $40. It's really easy to make the footbeds your own. Just pop them in an oven at 200 degrees for about two minutes, then slip the toasty inserts and your feet into your shoes.
NEWS
By Scott Carlson and Scott Carlson,Special to the Sun | August 1, 2007
A thought occurs to me now and then, when I turn on a burner and watch a ring of blue flame bloom underneath a pot: If I didn't have easy access to gas, electricity or even firewood, how would I feed myself? There are millions of people around the world who have difficulty getting their hands on cooking fuels like wood or coal, let alone natural gas. But a growing number of people are cooking with an abundant, clean power source: nuclear fusion -- or, in other words, the sun. This summer, I became one of them.
NEWS
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,Los Angeles Times | July 4, 2007
As long as I've had waffles, it's been a good weekend. They were one of the first things I fixed when I started learning to cook, and they are still one of my favorite indulgences. I've got a feeling that in that I'm not alone - at least among men. Waffles seem to be one of those "dad" meals, probably because the recipes are so simple any fool can make them acceptably, and it's hard to think of another food with a higher ratio of deliciousness to effort. As simple as waffles may be to make, they're a little difficult to talk about.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | May 18, 2007
Bo Briguglio and Gianni Thompson stood over a pot of steaming water with anticipation as tiny bubbles started jetting to the top. As the water reached a rolling boil, Gianni poured in a package of uncooked pasta. Bo dumped a stick of margarine into a skillet and started working on the cheese sauce for the finished product: baked macaroni and cheese. Although the two Dunloggin Middle School sixth-grade boys were in the midst of their family consumer science class, they also were learning an important lesson in giving.
NEWS
By Sharon Stangenes and Sharon Stangenes,Chicago Tribune | February 11, 2007
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Consider it the ultimate home center: a 37-acre bazaar where a record-breaking 1,900 exhibitors at the International Builders' Show displayed cutting-edge products for the home last week. Among the innovative items were smart refrigerators. Manufacturers are integrating high-tech entertainment devices and hookups into their appliances, as is the case with the LG Electronics refrigerator with a 15-inch, high-definition LCD TV screen on the door. The refrigerator also has a 4-inch screen that displays a five-day weather forecast, a recipe bank and digital photos uploaded from a USB port.
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