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By Carolyn Jung and Carolyn Jung,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 14, 1998
Drizzly skies and chilly temperatures are a great excuse to turn on the oven, warm up the house and cozy up to some succulent dishes made with the world's oldest cooking method -- roasting.The great thing about roasting is that it's easy. You throw ingredients in a pan, slide it into the oven, and stir only occasionally. It brings out the best in food, sealing in flavor, tenderness and juiciness.When roasting, use heavy metal roasting pans rather than light ones, which can warp at high heat.
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By Rob Kasper and Peter Jensen and Rob Kasper and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2001
With the flick of a lighter, the propane burner is lighted, and suddenly the back yard sounds like Baltimore-Washington International Airport during the morning rush hour. Ah, yes, the roar of a 160,000 Btu burner on full throttle. More rational people might be in-tixnidated by having such a noise near their homes. We aren't. We're about to use this industrial-strength burner to heat 35 pounds of peanut oil to the hot sizzle (or as sports announcer Keith Jackson might say, the "Whoa, Nellie")
FEATURES
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2002
Let us pause and praise the oven meal. Meat, vegetables, seasonings and sometimes a grain - all nestled together like so many peas in a pod. Happily heating away, mingling their essences until the whole takes on new flavors and textures not possible in stove-top or microwave cooking. It is miracle cooking. The oven meal also is comfort food personified. And now is the time to take advantage of its charms. "Oven dishes are typically what we do at home in the winter," said cooking teacher and chef Peggy Ryan of Evanston, Ill. "We have a few favorites like my braised lamb shanks with fennel, potatoes and lentils, or what I call Sicilian grandma food, like braciola - round steak stuffed and rolled with sausage and oven-braised in a red wine-tomato sauce."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Beth Breckenridge and Mary Beth Breckenridge,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 24, 2001
Barbara Snyder's gas range has quite a few unusual features. There are the burners with the extra holes that make a nice flame and can be turned way down, the handy shelf over the stove and the open space underneath that's perfect for storing pans, the green marbled trim that creates a crisp contrast to the off-white enamel surface. Then there's the dual-functioning oven. In winter, it also serves as a space heater. It doesn't bother Snyder that the uninsulated oven puts out so much heat that she can't use it in summer.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | April 10, 2002
THAWING TAKES time. Often I feel like a captive of frozen crystals, waiting for some frozen hunk of protein to gradually abandon its rigid state and be ready to be tossed in the oven or on the grill. As an impatient thawer, I have employed a variety of techniques to hurry the process along. I have become a prier, forcing frozen pieces apart with a knife, to allow air to circulate and do its liberating work. Occasionally, very occasionally, I have planned around the thaw, placing a frozen chicken in the refrigerator early in the morning, so it will be safely defrosted in time for the evening meal.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | November 2, 2005
Is there any way to get day-old bagels to taste as fresh at home as they do when they come straight from the bakery? You can come pretty close. First, there is the matter of storage. When I buy bagels, I store the day's ration in a loosely closed paper bag at room temperature. I put the rest into a large resealable plastic bag, suck out the air using a plastic drinking straw, seal and freeze. To rejuvenate a frozen bagel, take it out of the freezer an hour or so before you want to eat it. Preheat your oven or toaster oven to 400 degrees.
NEWS
April 9, 2000
Waffles taste best when served hot from the iron. To hold briefly before serving, arrange them in a single layer on heatproof plates and keep in a warm oven. Stacking waffles makes them soggy. Waffles can be frozen, wrapped in foil. Reheat about 10 minutes in 325-degree oven. -- Cole's Cooking A to Z.
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By Jeannette S. Keton and Jeannette S. Keton,Contributing Writer | January 5, 1994
Learning to use kitchen tools and appliances safely is an important part of any child's education. But for the estimated 7 million "latchkey" kids who take care of themselves after school and on holidays, it's critical."
NEWS
May 11, 1993
* Glen Burnie: Burglars broke into a home in the 7300 block of Green Acres Road between 11 p.m. Saturday and 2 a.m. Sunday and took a microwave oven valued at $300.
NEWS
February 22, 2006
The oven temperature was omitted from the Basic Muffin Recipe in the Feb. 8 Taste section. The muffins should be baked at 350 degrees. The Sun regrets the error.
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