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Ovarian Cancer

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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | December 30, 2011
A new international study shows that treating ovarian cancer with Avastin delays the disease progression and may improve survival. The drug, generically called bevacizumab, seemed to keep the disease from returning for two months. It was delayed five to six months in the highest risk group. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine , was co-led by Drs. Amit Oza of the Princess Margaret Cancer Program at the University of Toronto and Timothy Perren of the St James' Institute of Oncology in Leeds, U.K. The study began in 2004 and continues for another year.
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NEWS
By Pete Pichaske and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Breast cancer gets a lot of attention - and not just during October, which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. There's a good reason for that, as any of the quarter-million American women diagnosed with breast cancer each year will tell you. But breast cancer isn't the only serious health risk women should be aware of, according to county health professionals. Some are fatal; others are not. Some are well-known, others obscure. All affect the person's quality of life, and all affect more women than men. We talked with some Howard County doctors in the know to find out what to look out for and where to learn more locally.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | February 16, 1993
Ovarian cancer is the most common, fatal, gynecologic cancer. Fortunately, only one in 70 women will develop this cancer. By comparison, one in 10 women will develop breast cancer.But for the 22,000 women who will be diagnosed with this cancer in the next year, it is not very comforting to realize that only 40 percent will live five years. The most frustrating fact to scientists is that despite 20 years of studies in humans and 40 years of studies in animals, we have not yet discovered how to prevent the disease.
NEWS
By Anne McDonnell Sill | June 27, 2013
Nina, a resident of East Baltimore, celebrated her 41st birthday last Sunday. Surrounded by family and friends, she struggled for breath to extinguish the candles on her cake. Two years ago Nina was diagnosed with breast cancer . Genetic testing and prophylaxis might have prevented her illness, but unlike actress Angela Jolie, her financial resources did not allow her to take the $3,400 test. Now Nina suffers from the same disease that took the life of her mother when she was in her 40s, and her older sister, who died at the age of 34 from breast and ovarian cancer.
NEWS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 2005
Ovarian-cancer survival may be predicted by the levels of two proteins in the body, a new study shows, while other recent research suggests that more women's lives might be saved by using existing tests to diagnose persistent symptoms that might indicate the presence of the so-called "silent killer." Scientists at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston said in a report this week that low levels of both atypical protein kinase C iota and Cyclin E corresponded to a better chance of long-term survival for patients.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Sindya N. Bhanoo and Stephanie Shapiro and Sindya N. Bhanoo,Sun reporters | June 14, 2007
When cancer experts announced yesterday that they had identified certain symptoms that might indicate ovarian cancer, they sent a pointed message to patients and clinicians: Scrutiny of seemingly benign physical complaints can save lives. The "first national consensus on ovarian cancer symptoms" urged women and clinicians to regard bloating, abdominal pain, eating difficulties and urinary symptoms as possible early warning signs. According to the statement by the American Cancer Society, the Gynecologic Cancer Foundation and the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists, women should contact their doctors if they experience such symptoms almost daily for a few weeks.
FEATURES
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
To make it to the top in World Wrestling Entertainment, an intriguing story line is even more important than the requisite bulging biceps. The freakishly massive wrestler known simply as Batista, for example, has become professional wrestling's hottest fan favorite because of a story that has been months in the making on the WWE cable show Raw: Batista, part of a group of wrestlers he believed were mentoring him, breaks away on his own when he realizes they...
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2004
Researchers have clarified the vague warning signs of ovarian cancer - the so-called "silent killer" - which could lead to earlier detection and improved survival rates among women with the disease. Many healthy women experience at least some of the symptoms associated with the cancer, which is generally diagnosed only after it has reached an advanced stage. But scientists at the University of Washington School of Medicine and the Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle found that the symptoms - which include bloating, constipation, fatigue and urinary problems - occurred more frequently and with more severity in women with malignancies.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | December 19, 1992
Victims of ovarian cancer who are pinning their last hopes on the experimental drug taxol are suddenly fighting not just their disease but the refusal of insurance companies to cover costs of administering the drug.In Maryland, many doctors and patients say they are angry that Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland and other smaller insurers suddenly began in October to refuse to pay for taxol after more than a year of approving claims.Some companies, including Blue Cross, even began to ask some patients to return money paid for past treatments, saying in letters that the reimbursements were made in error.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2002
Shares of Novavax Inc., developer of an estrogen-replacement lotion, took another beating yesterday, sinking 16 percent after the release of a study linking ovarian cancer with estrogen-replacement therapy. The study, which appeared in yesterday's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, was one more bit of bad news for a Columbia company that had hoped to put Estrasorb, the first drug it developed itself, on the market by now. "There's no question it's been a challenging few months," said Chief Executive Officer John A. Spears.
HEALTH
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Researchers hailed the Supreme Court ruling Wednesday that bans the patenting of human DNA, saying it would expand access to genetic testing for disease at lower cost to patients. In a unanimous decision, the justices said Myriad Genetics did not have exclusive rights to the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 genes that are linked to significantly greater risk for breast cancer and thus should not be the only company allowed to test for it. "Myriad did not create anything," Justice Clarence Thomas wrote for his fellow justices.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Ovarian cancer can be a death sentence for many women. It is difficult to treat and often goes undetected until the late stages when it has spread to other organs in the pelvis and abdomen. Actress Angelina Jolie has reportedly decided to have her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed, a procedure known as a bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, to fend off getting the disease. Jolie is a carrier of a BRCA gene mutation, putting her at a 60 percent to 80 percent chance of developing breast cancer and a 25 percent to 40 percent chance of developing ovarian cancer.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 15, 2013
"Mom. Do you have that gene? Do I? Have you been tested? I thought Grandma had breast cancer . Why weren't you ever tested?" The questions from my 27-year-old daughter were coming fast. Angelina Jolie published an essay in The New York Times on Tuesday, saying that she had had both breasts removed, and then reconstructed, after learning that she carried the mutated gene that can predispose women to breast and ovarian cancer. And Jessie was on the phone to me. Family history had moved the actress to get tested.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 15, 2013
Actress Angelina Jolie, who got a double mastectomy to lower her chances of breast cancer, will also have her ovaries removed, according to People magazine. Jolie said in a New York Times editorial Tuesday that she had her breasts removed and reconstructed because she has a gene mutation that makes her risk of breast cancer high. Women with the BRCA1 gene mutation also have a high chance of developing ovarian cancer. There is no test to detect ovarian cancer and women often die from the disease because it is diagnosed in the late stages.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Actress Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy rather than risk developing breast cancer hit close to home for Melissa DeSantis, a Bel Air mother of three children. As DeSantis read about Jolie's experience, she began to feel a sense of kinship to the Hollywood star. DeSantis also made the tough decision to have her breasts removed in a February surgery. Like Jolie, she had one of the inherited gene mutations that leaves many women more likely to develop cancer.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to screen for hard-to-detect endometrial and ovarian cancers in women using a routine Pap smear, a discovery they hope eventually could reduce the number of deaths caused by the deadly malignancies. The researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center hope the Pap smear, a procedure in which cells are scraped from the cervix and examined under a microscope, can catch the two cancers in early stages and allow for earlier treatment. The Pap test has dramatically improved detection of cervical cancer over the years, curbing deaths by 75 percent among those who are screened.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 12, 1998
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Scientists might have one of the most effective weapons yet in the fight against deadly ovarian cancer if a treatment presented yesterday in Orlando succeeds in clinical tests."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 22, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- Most women with highly curable early-stage ovarian cancer are not meticulously checked during surgery to see if the disease has spread -- a lapse that could lead to death, according to a new National Cancer Institute study.The study also found that women frequently are not given the state-of-the-art chemotherapy recommended for ovarian cancer, especially if they are 65 or older and have advanced disease."It certainly is disturbing that people aren't getting the treatment we recommend," said Dr. Edward Trimble, an NCI researcher who presented the findings yesterday at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Philadelphia.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
It is well documented that African-American women with breast cancer are more likely to have a more aggressive type of the disease that kills them, but why remains a mystery. The answers may be found one day soon, as researchers focus more on the genetic makeup of cancer tumors and how African-American women may respond differently to treatment than women of other races. "There are two different tracks of research going on that could in the future help better treat African-American women with breast cancer ," said Rebecca McCoy, community health director of the advocacy group Komen Maryland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
Rebecca D. Dorsey, a Baltimore-born and -raised chanteuse, died Sept. 14 of ovarian cancer at her home in Sea Cliff, N.Y. She was 54. The daughter of a physician and a public relations executive, Rebecca Devereux Dorsey was born in Baltimore and raised in Glencoe and Homeland. After graduating in 1976 from Garrison Forest School, she earned a bachelor's degree in dance from Sarah Lawrence College in 1980. "She began studying singing at the Sorbonne, where she had gone to study French, and realized she had a voice," said her mother, Glorian Devereux Dorsey of Cockeysville, former director of public relations at The Baltimore Sun. "Then she came back and started studying acting in New York when she was in her 20s. " Ms. Dorsey modeled and had supporting roles in such films as "Wall Street," "Slaves of New York," "Working Girl" and several Woody Allen pictures, her mother said.
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