Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOval Office
IN THE NEWS

Oval Office

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 25, 2014
Sen. John McCain, who endlessly enjoys twisting the tail of what he suggests is a paper tiger in the White House, has altered the old Teddy Roosevelt axiom. He accuses President Obama of talking tough but carrying a big "twig. " Thus does he lament the president's penchant for drawing red lines on adversaries' foreign-policy misconduct, followed by subsequent timidity. He cites Obama's harsh words against Syrian atrocities and lack of action against them, and his mild sanctions in response to the recent Russian interventions in Crimea and eastern Ukraine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 7, 2014
I read recently that Gov. Martin O'Malley is considering a run for the Oval Office ( "O'Malley headed back to New Hampshire," Aug. 5). Shame on him. Let him stay in Maryland. A recent article stated that nearly 50 percent of Marylanders would opt to relocate to another state. I am one of them. I moved to Maryland in 2006 and always thought it was a great state for opportunity. But with the high taxes and extreme liberalism, I left. When I moved there, I was surprised at how complete strangers thought I should be responsible for their kids and how the state of Maryland did nothing to women who were willing to dump their kids on total strangers.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
I saw it with my own eyes -- Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley standing centerstage Tuesday in the Oval Office. Only it wasn't the one in Washington. It did, though, make for a light but fascinating kind of political-pop-culture-meta moment. O'Malley was in Harford County to visit the set of "House of Cards," the $100 million Netflix political thriller starring Kevin Spacey. The reason for the visit as the cast and crew settles in to film Season 2 was to highlight the success of a state film incentives program backed by O'Malley that has brought such award-winning productions as HBO's "Game Change" and "VEEP" as well as "House of Cards" to Maryland.
NEWS
By William L. Jacobsen Jr | July 30, 2014
Hillary Rodham Clinton - imagine if she runs and wins! In America, moms and dads of daughters will throw their arms around their girls' shoulders and say, "OK honey, now that the highest and seemingly most impervious glass ceiling is gone, in terms of your future, the sky's the limit!" Grandpas and grandmas will do the same with their granddaughters. Expect wide approval from American women of any age and enthusiastic response from women worldwide who will welcome the news that the charismatic, eloquent and tireless campaigner for women's welfare, rights and opportunities also is the new leader of the free world.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | February 5, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Nobody around here can remember exactly what it was they didn't like about George W. Bush. He is being hailed on all sides for his bipartisan reaching out, photo-opping, humble-as-pie normalcy. There is, of course, no such word as "normalcy," as any student of the presidency knows. It was a word made up in 1920 by another language-mangling Republican, Warren G. Harding. The 29th president, a newspaper editor and publisher with a knack for making friends, had campaigned in the turmoil of inflation, Red-baiting, and doubt about World War I and its aftermath by saying: "America's present need is not heroics, but healing, not nostrums but normalcy."
FEATURES
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | November 10, 2005
When President Bush grants the National Humanities Medal and the National Medal of Arts to 17 scholars, musicians, historians and others today, two Marylanders will be among those singled out. Eva Brann, a professor at St. John's College in Annapolis, and Walter Berns, a Bethesda historian, will receive the humanities prize during Oval Office ceremonies. Brann, a philosopher and intellectual historian, has taught at St. John's for the past 40 years, long ago emerging as a driving force at an institution The Weekly Standard once described as "the Great Books school ... where high thinking is carried on with democratic courtesies."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush went back to work in the Oval Office yesterday morning after his irregular heartbeat returned to normal overnight in response to medication.Although Mr. Bush's heart rhythm irregularity recurred briefly before his release at 9 a.m. from Bethesda Naval Hospital, his doctors determined it would not be necessary to apply the electrical shock treatment they were considering Sunday night."Back to work," the president declared when he arrived at the White House 20 minutes later, grinning broadly and flashing two thumbs up as a cheering crowd of staff members welcomed him home.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 21, 2014
One of the enduring misperceptions of American politics is that the vice presidency is a steppingstone to the presidency. Of the 47 men who have held the office, only four were elected to the Oval Office as sitting standbys: Adams, Jefferson, Van Buren and, 152 years later, the senior George Bush. And, of these, only Jefferson was given a second term. This bit of history has not discouraged the widespread impression that the individual "a heartbeat away" from the presidency has some kind of leg up on competitors for the office.
NEWS
By William L. Jacobsen Jr | July 30, 2014
Hillary Rodham Clinton - imagine if she runs and wins! In America, moms and dads of daughters will throw their arms around their girls' shoulders and say, "OK honey, now that the highest and seemingly most impervious glass ceiling is gone, in terms of your future, the sky's the limit!" Grandpas and grandmas will do the same with their granddaughters. Expect wide approval from American women of any age and enthusiastic response from women worldwide who will welcome the news that the charismatic, eloquent and tireless campaigner for women's welfare, rights and opportunities also is the new leader of the free world.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | October 4, 2008
Each voter has his or her own reason for selecting a candidate for president. Some are loyal to their party. Some weigh a candidate's stance on all the issues or a single topic like the environment, education, the Iraq war or abortion. And it wasn't that long ago that many chose the commander in chief based on which person they wanted to drink a beer with. But if you had to choose based on which candidate would be better for your investments, then what? Would you vote for John McCain, who has described himself as "fundamentally a deregulator" and wants to keep the Bush tax cuts?
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 25, 2014
Sen. John McCain, who endlessly enjoys twisting the tail of what he suggests is a paper tiger in the White House, has altered the old Teddy Roosevelt axiom. He accuses President Obama of talking tough but carrying a big "twig. " Thus does he lament the president's penchant for drawing red lines on adversaries' foreign-policy misconduct, followed by subsequent timidity. He cites Obama's harsh words against Syrian atrocities and lack of action against them, and his mild sanctions in response to the recent Russian interventions in Crimea and eastern Ukraine.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 21, 2014
One of the enduring misperceptions of American politics is that the vice presidency is a steppingstone to the presidency. Of the 47 men who have held the office, only four were elected to the Oval Office as sitting standbys: Adams, Jefferson, Van Buren and, 152 years later, the senior George Bush. And, of these, only Jefferson was given a second term. This bit of history has not discouraged the widespread impression that the individual "a heartbeat away" from the presidency has some kind of leg up on competitors for the office.
NEWS
August 24, 2013
Dan Rodricks ' column about Gov. Martin O'Malley's potential run for the presidency was full of puffery but short on actual reasons why Mr. O'Malley would make a good candidate ( "Martin O'Malley starts to take his victory lap," Aug. 20). Throughout Mr. O'Malley's time in office, we have seen many increased fees as well as a flurry of new taxes, such as the highly controversial "rain tax. " Mr. O'Malley's unfortunate decisions have harmed the middle class and driven businesses out of the state.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
I saw it with my own eyes -- Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley standing centerstage Tuesday in the Oval Office. Only it wasn't the one in Washington. It did, though, make for a light but fascinating kind of political-pop-culture-meta moment. O'Malley was in Harford County to visit the set of "House of Cards," the $100 million Netflix political thriller starring Kevin Spacey. The reason for the visit as the cast and crew settles in to film Season 2 was to highlight the success of a state film incentives program backed by O'Malley that has brought such award-winning productions as HBO's "Game Change" and "VEEP" as well as "House of Cards" to Maryland.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 4, 2013
Vice President Joe Biden, the Republicans' favorite punching bag, gave his critics nothing to laugh about as President Barack Obama's ultimate fireman in rescuing the country from the fiscal cliff it teetered on as 2012 ended. Mr. Biden's 11th-hour entry by partnering once again with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell struck a modest but crisis-postponing deal, raising taxes on the richest Americans but entailing little or no serious debt reduction. It enabled the president to say the middle class had been protected, but it also let the Republicans claim former President George W. Bush finally had finally gotten his way in making his tax cuts permanent.
NEWS
By Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy | May 30, 2012
"You will be our president when you read this note," George Herbert Walker Bush wrote to Bill Clinton, the man who defeated him in the 1992 campaign, denying Mr. Bush the provisional vindication that reelection provides until history has its chance to judge from a distance. Nonetheless, in Oval Office tradition, Mr. Bush left a note for Mr. Clinton to read on taking office, and it echoed the message of transitions past, even between bitter political rivals: "I am rooting hard for you. " Note the pronoun: You will be our president.
NEWS
By New York Times | May 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Doctors found cause for elation and concern when President Bush's heartbeat finally settled into a normal pattern after two long episodes of atrial fibrillation.The fact that drugs alone could produce and maintain normal rhythm for a number of hours makes it unlikely that the president will need an electrical shock to reset his heart. But the fact that the president's irregular heart rhythm was unusually resistant to medicines raises the odds that the rhythm will recur and that he will need drug therapy for months, maybe longer.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 2, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The White House began a campaign yesterday to save the candidacy of Michael B. Mukasey for attorney general, with President Bush defending the nominee in a speech and in an Oval Office interview, where he complained that Mukasey is "not being treated fairly" on Capitol Hill. With Mukasey's confirmation in doubt over his refusal to state a clear legal position on a classified CIA program to interrogate terror suspects, Bush took the unusual step of summoning a small group of reporters into the Oval Office to preview remarks he planned to make later in the day at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative research organization here.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 11, 2012
Vice President Joe Biden was accused of committing another gaffe the other day when he declared on a Sunday television talk showthat he was "absolutely comfortable" with the idea of same-sex marriage. His crime supposedly was that he embarrassed his boss, President Barack Obama, who was fence-straddling on the issue, saying only that his position was "evolving. " But the fact was, Mr. Biden did Mr. Obama a favor by creating a political situation in which the president was obliged to get off that fence and join his vice president on the side of the issue he was hinting at for a long time.
TRAVEL
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
What better way to celebrate Presidents Day weekend than getting up close and personal with all 43 presidents — well, their lifelike wax figures, that is. The Presidents Gallery at Madame Tussauds Washington opens this week with an unveiling of the museum's new $2 million exhibit featuring wax figures of the U.S. leaders, from No. 1, George Washington, to No. 44, Barack Obama. (Grover Cleveland, for those counting, was No. 22 and No. 24.) "This is the only place in the world where you are able to stand next to them, put your arms around them and interact with all 44 presidents in three-dimensional fashion," said Dan Rogoski, general manager of Madame Tussauds Washington.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.