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By PATRICK ERCOLANO | December 26, 1992
Bill Clinton probably didn't need another reminder that he's about to move into the world's largest fishbowl. But he got one anyway, in the form of a polite yet urgent petition from a group of American chefs who want him to set a national example as a consumer of healthful foods.Mr. President-elect, the chefs implored, would you kindly drop the much-publicized apres jogging refuelings at Mickey D's? We don't need a chowhound chief executive. A president whose shape matches that of the Oval Office.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 25, 2014
Sen. John McCain, who endlessly enjoys twisting the tail of what he suggests is a paper tiger in the White House, has altered the old Teddy Roosevelt axiom. He accuses President Obama of talking tough but carrying a big "twig. " Thus does he lament the president's penchant for drawing red lines on adversaries' foreign-policy misconduct, followed by subsequent timidity. He cites Obama's harsh words against Syrian atrocities and lack of action against them, and his mild sanctions in response to the recent Russian interventions in Crimea and eastern Ukraine.
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NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 28, 1999
SEVERAL MONTHS AGO, I asked the question: Who should be our next president? Should we elect yet another member of what future historians, looking back on late 20th-century American political leadership, will refer to as "The Long String of Bozos"? Or should we have the courage and wisdom to boldly change course and place the future of our great nation -- and, yes, the world -- into the capable, experienced hands of a professional humor columnist?Imagine how totally shocked and surprised I was when many of you wrote to me, sometimes in crayon, and said: "Our next president should be YOU, Dave!
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 21, 2014
One of the enduring misperceptions of American politics is that the vice presidency is a steppingstone to the presidency. Of the 47 men who have held the office, only four were elected to the Oval Office as sitting standbys: Adams, Jefferson, Van Buren and, 152 years later, the senior George Bush. And, of these, only Jefferson was given a second term. This bit of history has not discouraged the widespread impression that the individual "a heartbeat away" from the presidency has some kind of leg up on competitors for the office.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | January 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's statement that ''way over 90 percent'' of political contributions are legitimate misses the point. It is equally true that way over 90 percent of us don't hold up liquor stores.Less obvious is whether the president is correct that there has been ''no pattern and practice here of trying to push our system over the brink into corruption.'' That is precisely the question that needs to be answered either by the Justice Department or the special Senate investigation.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1997
If you're a kid and live in the Franklintown or Rosemont neighborhoods of West Baltimore and want to play a pickup baseball game, one of the few places you can go without getting scolded is here: a 1,000-foot-wide grassy meadow in Gwynns Falls-Leakin Park.Julian Thomas Jr. used to come here in the summer to play ball, fly kites and search for crawfish under rocks in the cool waters of Gwynns Falls.Now 44, Thomas still comes to the meadow occasionally to shoot baskets -- a little exercise to stave off the effects of middle age."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2002
Gil de Ferran's voice is a mixture of joy and sadness as he answers a question about his Penske Team's move from Championship Auto Racing Teams to the Indy Racing League. "I am missing and going to miss, probably my whole life, road racing," he said, referring to leaving the versatile CART series, in which he won the past two season championships while competing on road, street and oval courses, for the purely oval-based IRL. "That's how I started racing. That's what I fell in love with.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. -- President-elect Bill Clinton too strikingly somber leave of his native Arkansas yesterday, recalling that Abraham Lincoln left his home state of Illinois 132 years ago and returned home only to be buried.Predicting some "harrowing" moments in his presidential "adventure," Mr. Clinton told an airport send-off rally in Little Rock: "I don't know when I'll be home again because of the incredible press of events. . . . I ask you to pray for us. I ask youto pull for us."
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2004
Rufus Wainwright, the literate singer-songwriter, has small roles in two new films: Martin Scorsese's The Aviator and the Merchant-Ivory production Heights. "In both of these movies, I have great entrances," he says on the phone from Los Angeles, "and that's all you really need." The 31-year-old musician, who will be playing at Johns Hopkins University's Shriver Hall tonight, has been making great entrances for a long time now. Consider his lineage: His parents are the legendary folk singers Loudon Wainwright III and Kate McGarrigle.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - President Bush gave the order to go to war last night shortly before 7 p.m. Soon after, he retired to the White House residence to have dinner with his wife, having made a decision that could define his presidency and change the United States' role in the world. Bush's order came toward the end of an Oval Office meeting with military advisers that lasted more than 3 1/2 hours, far longer than usual for a president who is sometimes short on patience and demands that advisers be brief and to the point.
NEWS
August 24, 2013
Dan Rodricks ' column about Gov. Martin O'Malley's potential run for the presidency was full of puffery but short on actual reasons why Mr. O'Malley would make a good candidate ( "Martin O'Malley starts to take his victory lap," Aug. 20). Throughout Mr. O'Malley's time in office, we have seen many increased fees as well as a flurry of new taxes, such as the highly controversial "rain tax. " Mr. O'Malley's unfortunate decisions have harmed the middle class and driven businesses out of the state.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
I saw it with my own eyes -- Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley standing centerstage Tuesday in the Oval Office. Only it wasn't the one in Washington. It did, though, make for a light but fascinating kind of political-pop-culture-meta moment. O'Malley was in Harford County to visit the set of "House of Cards," the $100 million Netflix political thriller starring Kevin Spacey. The reason for the visit as the cast and crew settles in to film Season 2 was to highlight the success of a state film incentives program backed by O'Malley that has brought such award-winning productions as HBO's "Game Change" and "VEEP" as well as "House of Cards" to Maryland.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2011
If you want to talk about street and road courses, Penske driver Will Power is the man to start with. Over his seven-year career, Power has won 14 races — 13 of them on the twisting roads. But the 30-year-old Australian says dominating the streets isn't something that comes naturally. It's a skill he's been working on for more than three decades. "It takes about a decade of just doing street races to perfect the skills," he said. "I grew up doing that. The U.S. is the only place for ovals.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Jonathan Bor and Stephanie Desmon and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporters | May 24, 2008
Despite Sen. John McCain's three bouts with melanoma - including a surgery in 2000 that left his cheek visibly scarred - the presumptive Republican presidential nominee's doctors yesterday declared him cancer-free and in general good health. The Arizona senator's medical history puts him at increased risk for future skin cancer, so he sees his dermatologist at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., every three to four months. This year, he had a minor skin cancer removed from his lower leg. "At the present time, Senator McCain enjoys excellent health and displays extraordinary energy," Dr. John D. Eckstein, McCain's internist at the Mayo Clinic, told reporters yesterday.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2008
Bob Sorensen Project coordinator Rink Management Services, Reisterstown Salary --$52,000 Age --40 Years on the job --20 How he got started --Originally from New Jersey, Sorensen started off as a skier, eventually landing a job at a ski facility in his home state. He began working with the owner of Rink Management Services, opening and managing ski facilities. About 10 years ago they also began managing ice rinks, then transitioned away from working with ski resorts to just specializing in rinks.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 2, 2007
Surrounded by Ferris wheels and roller coasters, the racetrack at Timonium Fairgrounds resembles a carousel with live horses. It's a tiny oval with hairpin turns - a thrill for some jockeys, a not-so-merry-go-round for others. At five-eighths of a mile, Timonium is barely half the size of Pimlico Race Course. Thoroughbreds race here just seven days a year on weekends during the Maryland State Fair, which ends tomorrow. But that's long enough to give the track a feel all its own.For instance, the 100-foot Ferris wheel spinning near the far turn has scared more than one equine.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 8, 1994
Fish are vanishing from the oceans. Mammals that walk upright on land cannot be far behind.Everyone wants to put Hillary Rodham Clinton in her place. Whether that is in Arkansas, jail or the Oval Office, no one can agree.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun reporter | May 6, 2007
Hillary Clinton is trying to go where no woman has gone before - to the White House. Other women have run for the country's highest office - from Shirley Chisholm to Elizabeth Dole. But never has a woman had such a good chance first to capture her party's nomination, then to win the presidency. So this time it could happen - the United States could have a woman president. Is the country ready for that? Perhaps the most amazing thing is that in the 21st century, that question is even being asked.
FEATURES
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | November 10, 2005
When President Bush grants the National Humanities Medal and the National Medal of Arts to 17 scholars, musicians, historians and others today, two Marylanders will be among those singled out. Eva Brann, a professor at St. John's College in Annapolis, and Walter Berns, a Bethesda historian, will receive the humanities prize during Oval Office ceremonies. Brann, a philosopher and intellectual historian, has taught at St. John's for the past 40 years, long ago emerging as a driving force at an institution The Weekly Standard once described as "the Great Books school ... where high thinking is carried on with democratic courtesies."
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