Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOutsider Art
IN THE NEWS

Outsider Art

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 10, 1995
The biggest news of the coming art season will be the Nov. 24 opening of the American Visionary Art Museum, the first museum in America devoted to "outsider" art -- works created by self-taught artists.Located in an imaginatively designed structure at Key Highway and Covington Street at the Inner Harbor, the museum is the $7 million brainchild of Baltimorean Rebecca Hoffberger. It has been designated -- by Congressional resolution, no less -- the official national visionary art museum.The museum opens at a time of increasing interest in the product of untutored artists, and its Inner Harbor location will likely make it a major tourist draw.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Benn Ray, benn@atomicbooks.com | January 15, 2014
As far as years go, 2014 has come barreling out of the gate, with a whole host of happenings already lined up in Hampden. Gallery 788, 3602 Hickory Ave., presents Learning By Heart, an exhibit and performance for children 4-12 with no formal training, on Jan. 19, from 4-8 p.m. It's sort of like the kiddie equivalent of outsider art. Kids can show their art work, sing, dance, recite, act or tell jokes. All performances must be non-violent and family-friendly. For more information, call 202-210-8361.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | March 14, 1993
Outsider Art itself may be in, but the name for it has one foot out the door.The New Orleans Museum of Art, for example, uses the label "works by self-taught artists" instead of "outsider art" for the exhibit it is organizing of over 250 paintings and sculptures by almost 80 Southern artists from 1940 to the present.Although some of the artists are admittedly eccentric, many are in the mainstream of rural America, explains Dannal Perry, a curatorial assistant involved in planning the show, which opens in New Orleans on Oct. 23 before touring the country.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | May 28, 2006
FROM A DISTANCE, THE SPOT looks like a small, green bus-stop shelter unaccountably sitting on the banks of a bubbling brook. The closer you get, the odder the scene becomes. Instead of benches inside the structure, a pair of old-fashioned porch swings face each other, as if the place were a setting for a proper Victorian courtship. SCULPTURE AT EVERGREEN / / Through Sept. 24 / / Evergreen House, 4545 N. Charles St. / / Free / / 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, noon-4 p.m. weekends / / 410-516-0341
NEWS
May 15, 1998
AFTER LAST exhibiting apparitions of apocalypse, Baltimore's American Visionary Art Museum has shifted gears. In a year-long show that opens Friday, it is exploring love in all of its mysterious manifestations. David Bowie and his wife, Imam, are honorary co-chairmen of the exhibit."All of us have had very unique experiences with love, both when we err and when it's divine," explains museum founder Rebecca Hoffberger.This is AVAM's fourth thematic show since the museum opened on Thanksgiving, 1995 at the foot of Federal Hill.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | November 19, 1995
The world's best-known museum of visionary or outsider art is the Collection de l'Art Brut in Lausanne, Switzerland. Housed on an estate known as the Chateau de Beaulieu, it contains the collection of artist Jean Dubuffet."
NEWS
December 24, 1993
Baltimore is about to get its newest museum, the brainchild of local arts activist Rebecca Hoffberger, who has been the driving force behind the American Visionary Art Museum, to be located on Key Highway across from the Inner Harbor. It will specialize in "outsider" or "visionary" art -- works created by self-taught individuals independent of the influence of mainstream art. There are a several institutions devoted to visionary art in Europe, but none in this country.Ms. Hoffberger has raised $5.5 million to build the museum and get it running.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | July 4, 1999
To enter Paul Darmafall's exhibition is to step into a chaotic and beautiful world invented by a troubled man.Because of mental illness, Darmafall, who is known as the Baltimore Glassman, has been unable to hold a job for nearly 40 years. Instead, he has produced a steady stream of art fashioned from found boards, broken glass and glue. The 72-year-old's work is sold in galleries from Berlin to Los Angeles, and more than 200 of his artworks are on view through Sept. 5 at the American Visionary Art Museum.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 7, 1994
Liz Whitney Quisgard's dazzlingly colored paintings and sculptures, with their intricate arrangements of dots, have been likened to Byzantine and Islamic mosaics, Seurat's pointillism and outsider art.Outsider art they are definitely not, since the term implies creation by people innocent of formal training. Quisgard's work clearly displays the effects of her thorough training -- she studied both art and architecture at the Maryland Institute, College of Art. (She lived and taught in Baltimore for many years, though she now lives in New York.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | January 18, 2006
A visitor to Baltimore's American Visionary Art Museum, who has been rooted in front of a painting for several minutes, turns and comments excitedly to a stranger about how much she likes the work. Immediately the pair becomes engaged in animated conversation, smiling widely, nodding, gesturing toward the artwork. Before parting, the two women hug. One of them, it turns out, is Rebecca Hoffberger, the museum's founding director. At most museums, visitors rarely bump into top staff members, much less exchange observations and warm hugs with the chief administrator.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | January 18, 2006
A visitor to Baltimore's American Visionary Art Museum, who has been rooted in front of a painting for several minutes, turns and comments excitedly to a stranger about how much she likes the work. Immediately the pair becomes engaged in animated conversation, smiling widely, nodding, gesturing toward the artwork. Before parting, the two women hug. One of them, it turns out, is Rebecca Hoffberger, the museum's founding director. At most museums, visitors rarely bump into top staff members, much less exchange observations and warm hugs with the chief administrator.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
In the world's bottomless pit of stuff, one person's overstock of Chia Pets is another person's treasure. Particularly if that person happens to be Ted Frankel, a puckish man with a Harpo Marxish countenance and a penchant for visual hilarity. Five months ago, Frankel, 53, impulsively left Chicago, where he operates three popular retail stores, to open Sideshow, the newly expanded gift shop at the American Visionary Art Museum in South Baltimore. Sideshow affords the "openness to allow people to be who they want to be," Frankel says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | January 13, 2002
Since ancient times, artists have decorated buildings with mosaics -- pictures or designs made from small, colorful pieces of stone, glass or tile set in mortar. That international tradition lives on in an ambitious community art project that is transforming the appearance of the American Visionary Art Museum, overlooking Baltimore's Inner Harbor. For four months, museum staffers have been working with students from Southern High School and other volunteers to create panels that will eventually cover the three-story building's exterior, creating the largest outdoor mosaic of its kind in Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | July 4, 1999
To enter Paul Darmafall's exhibition is to step into a chaotic and beautiful world invented by a troubled man.Because of mental illness, Darmafall, who is known as the Baltimore Glassman, has been unable to hold a job for nearly 40 years. Instead, he has produced a steady stream of art fashioned from found boards, broken glass and glue. The 72-year-old's work is sold in galleries from Berlin to Los Angeles, and more than 200 of his artworks are on view through Sept. 5 at the American Visionary Art Museum.
NEWS
May 15, 1998
AFTER LAST exhibiting apparitions of apocalypse, Baltimore's American Visionary Art Museum has shifted gears. In a year-long show that opens Friday, it is exploring love in all of its mysterious manifestations. David Bowie and his wife, Imam, are honorary co-chairmen of the exhibit."All of us have had very unique experiences with love, both when we err and when it's divine," explains museum founder Rebecca Hoffberger.This is AVAM's fourth thematic show since the museum opened on Thanksgiving, 1995 at the foot of Federal Hill.
NEWS
May 31, 1997
WHEN THE American Visionary Art Museum opened near Federal Hill 18 months ago, "outsider" art by self-taught artists was still a little-known concept.Since then, the visibility and popularity of this genre has fairly exploded. So much so that the privately operated Baltimore museum now has to struggle to keep on the cutting edge of artistic expression.That it does in "The End is Near: Visions of Apocalypse, Millennium and Utopia," which opens today and explores human fascination with the end times.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | November 26, 1993
Rebecca's dream is finally coming true.In a private ceremony at 11 a.m. Sunday, ground will be broken near the Inner Harbor for the American Visionary Art Museum, the longtime vision of Baltimorean Rebecca Hoffberger. And miracle of miracles, it's going to be less expensive to build than she thought.Ms. Hoffberger, 41, who has been striving to bring a visionary or "outsider" art museum to Baltimore for eight years, was handed a wonderful surprise recently when construction bids came in. "We expected the costs to be about $6.25 million, and the low bid was about a million under that," she says.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 3, 1991
She has raised $2 million and hopes to have another $4 million soon, but she gets no salary, has no stationery with a letterhead, and her headquarters consists of two un-air-conditioned rooms in the garage building of Harbor Court, for which she pays "less than $290 a month rent."Is this any way to run a museum?It is if you're Rebecca Hoffberger, and the American Visionary Art Museum is your dream. For several years Hoffberger, now 38, has been working to open the first museum in the Western Hemisphere devoted to visionary or outsider art. There are, she says, "a dozen" such museums in Europe devoted to outsider art, notably the one founded in Lausanne, Switzerland, by artist Jean Dubuffet, who called this work "art brut" or "raw art."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | November 24, 1995
From the writhing, expressive sculptures of Bessie Harvey to Thomas Jordan's exquisite creatures fashioned from leaves and thorns, a new world of art makes its debut in Baltimore today. The American Visionary Art Museum opens its doors to the public at 10 a.m. with an inaugural exhibit, "Tree of Life," that's symbolic of the new museum: ambitious and exhilarating, if not quite thoroughly defined.The brainchild of its founder and president, Baltimorean Rebecca Hoffberger, AVAM is the only major museum devoted to visionary art in the United States.
NEWS
November 19, 1995
Visionary art is hot in America today. Museums buy it. Major collectors have sprung up. Prices have risen. And on Friday, the American Visionary Art Museum will open at the Inner Harbor.The product of a decade of hopes and hard work by Baltimorean Rebecca Hoffberger, AVAM stands to be prominent internationally. "It will be world famous," predicts John Maizels, who publishes the London-based magazine of visionary art Raw Vision.But even as it opens, probably most Americans have never heard of visionary art, and few could define it. What is visionary art, anyway, and who makes it?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.