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NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
The exclusive Jemicy School for children with dyslexia reaches only about 140 youngsters in its full-time classes, but that doesn't keep its staff from reaching others affected by the learning disorder.Beginning next week, the Owings Mills school will share some different learning methods in a study skills course for middle school students, says Barbara Wolfe, a teacher who directs the school's outreach program. The 12-week evening course will help students organize their work, take notes, think critically, write reports and take tests.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Dodson and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
On Sunday, Baltimore Rowing Club Director of Youth Rowing Judd Anderson stood up during the service at his church to give an announcement. But while he began to share the news that 17 of his rowers will attend this weekend's USRowing Youth National Championships in Sacramento, Calif., Anderson began to choke up. It's the most rowers the club has ever sent, but that's not the only reason Anderson became emotional. In 2011, he began a program through the club named Reach High Baltimore: Rowers Empowering Baltimore Youth as a way introduce inner-city students from sixth to 11th grade to the sport.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Mary S. "Molly" Jameson, who established and directed two outreach programs at St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church in Baltimore, died Sunday of breast cancer at her Lutherville home. She was 81. The daughter of a building contractor and an educator, Mary Smart was born in Garrett County and raised in Oakland, Friendsville and Grantsville. After graduating from Oakland High School in 1948, she enrolled at what is now Towson University, where she earned a bachelor's degree in 1952.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
Christine Crawford, vice president of the Baltimore County Chamber of Commerce, was recently named to the board for the The Foundation for Baltimore County Public Library. The foundation provides funding for projects that encourage children and young adults to cultivate enthusiasm for reading and learning -- such as Storyville, My First Library Card and Summer Reading Club - and raises funds for programs or projects that enhance systemwide library goals and objectives. Crawford joined the Baltimore County Chamber of Commerce in July 2005 as director of membership.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | December 27, 1998
Port Discovery is designed to be more than a place to climb a tower or build a wind-driven machine. It is also aspiring to be a place where disadvantaged children will have opportunities for learning and cultural enrichment, where exhibits will be tied to school curricula and where visitors can learn where to pursue their interests beyond the museum.In defining its role as a community resource, Port Discovery follows in the path of children's museums across the country."It's been that way from the beginning - children's museums have been committed to serving all families from the get-go," says Andrew Ackerman, director of the Children's Museum of Manhattan and president of the Association of Youth Museums board.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2001
It starts with a newspaper blowing through a cemetery. A skinny teen-ager with ghost-white skin and dark circles under his eyes picks up the paper to read the headline: "Heroin claims local teen." He drops the paper and as it hits the ground, guitars and drums launch into the powerful and fast-paced music video for "Heroin Kills," the rock 'n' roll diatribe written about two years ago for Residents Attacking Drugs' nationally known and much-used film of the same name. The MTV-style music video debuted Tuesday night at Carroll County's annual drug summit.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
Letter writer Gary Bohlke suggests that Coppin State University has failed and should be closed ("Admit Coppin is a failed institution and close it," May 7). I disagree strongly. The outreach programs at Coppin State receive high marks. As a current month-long visitor to Baltimore, I have participated regularly in outreach programs at Coppin, and my experiences there have been nothing short of fabulous. Coppin's wellness program offers Baltimore residents use of modern athletic facilities for various sporting activities at a very low cost.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | May 27, 1991
In the 1990s, business leaders must become comfortable with cultural diversity in the workplace, says Paul Beatty, the newly appointed "executive in residence" at the University of Baltimore.In his new job, the 49-year-old Mr. Beatty is responsible for developing executive training programs in connection with the university. These will be among the first business "outreach" programs for the school and many will focus on workplace diversity, says Mr. Beatty, former head of human resources for Chase Bank of Maryland.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Staff Writer | June 4, 1993
Salisbury State University has become the first college in Maryland named to participate in a joint study program with the National Aeronautical and Space Administration, officials announced yesterday.The university is expected to receive a $110,000 grant over three years from NASA's Joint Venture Institutions program. The grant will be used for faculty fellowships, undergraduate scholarships and outreach programs for high school students, according to Phillip Creighton, dean of the Henson School of Science and Technology at Salisbury State.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | September 24, 1993
As county executive, Robert R. Neall has had to deal with a lot of characters, but he had never seen the likes of the pack of curs that showed up at his office yesterday.Actually, the canines were anything but threatening. They were helping to celebrate the privatization of three volunteer programs serving senior citizens, including the popular Pets on Wheels, which brings dogs, cats and a pot-bellied pig to visit county nursing home residents.The parade of six dogs trotting through the halls of the Arundel Center brought some stares from county workers.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Magic Johnson may have survived for more than 20 years with HIV and is in apparent good health, but don't let the basketball legend's success story fool you. HIV and AIDS remain scourges in the African-American community, where experts say infection rates are higher than in any other demographic group — and rising fast. On Thursday, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People kicked off a campaign to enlist local pastors and ministers in spreading the word that the HIV-AIDs crisis in their communities is more severe than many realize, and that plenty can be done to help.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
We applaud the work of the public and nonprofit agencies that seek out uninsured Marylanders to enroll in health insurance programs ( "Maryland seeks uninsured to inform about health reform Sept. 7). Research shows that having insurance reduces health disparities and improves well-being. The lengths to which these folks must go shows again the folly of Obamacare. No other advanced nation has to find people who don't have insurance - because everyone has insurance. Each dollar spent in outreach and enrollment is diverted from the actual delivery of health care.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
Letter writer Gary Bohlke suggests that Coppin State University has failed and should be closed ("Admit Coppin is a failed institution and close it," May 7). I disagree strongly. The outreach programs at Coppin State receive high marks. As a current month-long visitor to Baltimore, I have participated regularly in outreach programs at Coppin, and my experiences there have been nothing short of fabulous. Coppin's wellness program offers Baltimore residents use of modern athletic facilities for various sporting activities at a very low cost.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | January 31, 2013
Musical and cultural diversity are at the heart of what the Harlem Quartet is all about. The string ensemble brings an eclectic program to Columbia when it performs for the Candlelight Concert Society series on Saturday, Feb. 2, at 8 p.m., at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. This program's mix of venerable classical selections and contemporary compositions features Turina's "La Oracion del Torero," Op. 34; Haydn's Quartet in D minor, Op. 76, No. 2, "Fifths"; Chick Corea's "Adventures of Hippocrates"; Mozart's Quartet No. 15 in D minor, K. 421; and Walter Piston's Quartet No. 1. The Harlem Quartet, which previously appeared for the Candlelight series in 2010, has been doing varied programs since it made its debut at New York's Carnegie Hall in 2006.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | July 29, 2012
Sykesville's Gate House Museum of History has always highlighted the community past, but these days visitors entering the small museum can almost feel a sense of renewal and vitality as well. The atmosphere is almost as if someone came along and — at least figuratively — cleared away the dust, clutter and cobwebs. Visitors are greeted by a new display called "Making Tracks: A Chronological History of Sykesville," which includes pictures and spiffy graphics and takes up an entire wall.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Not long after boarding a boat with an Annapolis police officer this week, DeSean Turner, 11, boasted that he would catch at least 40 fish, but he refused to touch the worms without using needle-nose pliers. The other boy on the boat, 13-year-old Jordan Bowdry, set a goal to touch neither a wiggly worm nor a flopping fish the entire day. To Sgt. Kevin Krauss, they were the ideal pair of fishing companions: boys picked from Annapolis neighborhoods where an officer's presence usually means trouble.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2004
Baltimore isn't crawling with rats like New York, but the city's problem is critical enough that the Rat Rub Out project will now be handled through the Health Department. Mayor Martin O'Malley and city Health Commissioner Dr. Peter L. Beilenson announced the switch yesterday, which removes the rat program from the Department of Public Works. It makes sense, they say, because rats pose a public health risk. "Rats are in many ways a preventable condition," Beilenson said. "We can do outreach programs that serve as easy ways to get the word out to folk."
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | August 8, 1991
Several county churches that rent public schools on Sundays expect to face financial hardship when the school system raises their rent byas much as 10 percent this fall.At a recent meeting, the school board approved continued use by the churches, but representatives of some churches expressed doubt whether they would be able to afford the new rates, says Bill Peacock, of the school system's planning and construction department.Right now, the average church pays $211.50 to rent a county school for three hours on Sunday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Mary S. "Molly" Jameson, who established and directed two outreach programs at St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church in Baltimore, died Sunday of breast cancer at her Lutherville home. She was 81. The daughter of a building contractor and an educator, Mary Smart was born in Garrett County and raised in Oakland, Friendsville and Grantsville. After graduating from Oakland High School in 1948, she enrolled at what is now Towson University, where she earned a bachelor's degree in 1952.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | March 8, 2012
The Senate Budget and Taxation Committee voted to cut money from the University of Maryland this afternoon at the request of Sen. Richard Colburn, an Eastern Shore Republican who is angry that the university's environmental law clinic is pursuing a case against an Eastern Shore farming family. The issue has rankled rural lawmakers since 2010, when Perdue Farms brought it to the attention of the Eastern Shore delegation. The farmers, Alan and Kristin Hudson, contract with Perdue to raise chickens and are accused of polluting a Bay tributary.
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