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NEWS
January 6, 2014
Psychiatrists Steven S. Sharfstein and John J. Boronow recently noted that Maryland does not have an assisted outpatient treatment program for people with serious mental illness ( "Close the mental health revolving door," Dec. 29). Assisted outpatient treatment programs allow courts to order a very narrowly defined class of individuals - those with a history of violence, arrest or needless hospitalizations - to stay in treatment as a condition of living in the community. Assisted outpatient programs reduced homelessness, hospitalizations, arrests and incarcerations in New York, California, North Carolina and 39 other states.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
The campus at Kennedy Krieger Institute in East Baltimore is about to get a little bigger with plans for a new outpatient building to be built in part with an $8 million gift from the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation. Demand for outpatient treatment is growing 20 percent a year, contributing to the need for more space to expand services, Kennedy Krieger CEO Dr. Gary Goldstein said in announcing the plans Wednesday. "The building is full," Goldstein said. "This program has grown enormously because of the need," he added.
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NEWS
March 13, 2014
I am glad the legislature is considering a law for outpatient mental health commitment. ( "Legislation pushes involuntary mental health treatment," March 10). It is understandable that there is opposition by some, including health organizations. But this will help to air both sides of the issue in the legislative committee hearings. While some people regard this kind of law with alarm, it is important to note that 37 states and the District of Columbia currently have such laws.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
I am glad the legislature is considering a law for outpatient mental health commitment. ( "Legislation pushes involuntary mental health treatment," March 10). It is understandable that there is opposition by some, including health organizations. But this will help to air both sides of the issue in the legislative committee hearings. While some people regard this kind of law with alarm, it is important to note that 37 states and the District of Columbia currently have such laws.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
Well, well, what a surprise, Maryland is poised to pass some form of an indefinite forced medication bill ( "Legislation pushes involuntary mental health treatment," March 10). Presumably the forced ingestion will end when the subject is cured or hell freezes over, whichever comes first. And all in the name of some perceived safety benefit. I say perceived because, 1) the evidence shows the so-called mentally ill are not any more prone to violence than the general population, and 2)
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1996
The state's hospital rate-setting commission approved new regulations yesterday allowing collection of detailed outpatient data.The regulations include some confidentiality safeguards, after opponents worried that patient privacy might be compromised. Still, opponents said they would continue to battle for protection, perhaps through legislation in next year's General Assembly session.The additional safeguards "are a step in the right direction, appreciating our concern that the information can be personally identifiable.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
The campus at Kennedy Krieger Institute in East Baltimore is about to get a little bigger with plans for a new outpatient building to be built in part with an $8 million gift from the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation. Demand for outpatient treatment is growing 20 percent a year, contributing to the need for more space to expand services, Kennedy Krieger CEO Dr. Gary Goldstein said in announcing the plans Wednesday. "The building is full," Goldstein said. "This program has grown enormously because of the need," he added.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | May 1, 1993
After 18 months of construction, the Union Memorial Hospital today unveils a $28 million expansion designed to house its nursing schools and improve services for outpatients.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, Rep. Benjamin Cardin, D-3rd, and other dignitaries were scheduled to cut the ribbon for the eight-story Johnston Professional Building at 3333 N. Calvert St.The brick-clad building is part of a trend in which hospitals are constructing separate ambulatory-care facilities to enable them to treat many conditions and perform many procedures, including surgeries, on an outpatient basis rather than requiring hospitalization.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
Mounting hospital bills, especially for outpatient services, were the largest driver of increased health costs in Maryland, according to a report presented yesterday to the Maryland Health Care Commission. Overall, health spending in Maryland by private insurers was 10.6 percent higher in 2001 than in 2000, according to the report - about the same as the 10.5 percent rate nationally. "Price inflation explained only a small part of the growth," Ben Steffen, deputy director for data systems and analysis, told the commission at its meeting in Baltimore yesterday.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 10, 2012
Johns Hopkins is working with a company in India that is opening a network of clinics throughout the country. Johns Hopkins doctors and faculty will advise Bharat Family Clinic on development of clinical programs and help with facility design. Hopkins employees will also advise on operations of the new chain.  The chain of primary and secondary care clinics will be developed over the next ten years with the first slated to open in November. The new facilities will adopt the outpatient primary care procedures and protocols of Johns Hopkins Community Physicians, the hospitals doctors group.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
Kudos to the Baltimore Sun very for your well reported article, "Bill supports involuntary mental health treatment" (March 10). The gist of the last 20 years of background on this topic is that when the legislators closed down the institutions across the country, the money "saved" was supposed to go to fund the "assertive community treatment centers" and those monies never reached the communities. Yes, these programs may be expensive, but due to the past 20 years of non-treatment, we now have over 50 percent of mentally ill people self-medicating with alcohol or drugs and now have many dual diagnosis cases.
NEWS
January 6, 2014
Psychiatrists Steven S. Sharfstein and John J. Boronow recently noted that Maryland does not have an assisted outpatient treatment program for people with serious mental illness ( "Close the mental health revolving door," Dec. 29). Assisted outpatient treatment programs allow courts to order a very narrowly defined class of individuals - those with a history of violence, arrest or needless hospitalizations - to stay in treatment as a condition of living in the community. Assisted outpatient programs reduced homelessness, hospitalizations, arrests and incarcerations in New York, California, North Carolina and 39 other states.
NEWS
December 31, 2013
Regarding John J. Boronow and Steven S. Sharfstein's recent commentary on mental illness, I said the same thing, albeit more bluntly and without a clinical diagnosis, in a 2007 unpublished letter to the editor ("Close the mental health revolving door," Dec. 29). My letter emphasized mandatory medication, which certainly would be a part of any "assisted outpatient treatment" law. I would also include patients reacting to undesirable drug side effects. Many patients receiving outpatient treatment for mental illness, including the student responsible for the 2007 Virginia Tech shootings, deplore the side effects of the medications and choose not to take them.
NEWS
October 11, 2013
Calendar Wellness programs: Howard County General Hospital will offer the following classes in October. Unless otherwise listed all classes will be held in the Wellness Center, 10710 Charter Drive, Suite 100, Columbia. Information: hcgh.org or 410-740-7601. •Prenatal class for early pregnancy. In the first trimester, learn about the early stages of pregnancy including your body's physical changes, your baby's growth and easy ways to support your pregnancy from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15. •Smoke-free classes.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
Americans' bad diets are leading many people to have their gallbladders removed because of gallstones. The stones, which can vary in size, are not usually problematic if they are asymptomatic. People with symptoms such as extreme abdominal pain may be at risk for gallbladder gangrene and other complications, said Dr. Andrew Rosenstein, chief of gastroenterology at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. Removing the gallbladder is often a remedy for these patients, Rosenstein said.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
Seven Maryland health care centers that received tainted steroids linked to a nationwide meningitis outbreak will be required to turn over documents and give testimony under subpoenas filed last week in a federal lawsuit. A steering committee of lawyers representing patients who were given doses of the medication filed 76 of the subpoenas across the country. Patients in 22 states received injections of the steroids last year before they were recalled; 745 of them developed fungal meningitis or other health issues as a result, and 58 died.
NEWS
December 31, 2013
Regarding John J. Boronow and Steven S. Sharfstein's recent commentary on mental illness, I said the same thing, albeit more bluntly and without a clinical diagnosis, in a 2007 unpublished letter to the editor ("Close the mental health revolving door," Dec. 29). My letter emphasized mandatory medication, which certainly would be a part of any "assisted outpatient treatment" law. I would also include patients reacting to undesirable drug side effects. Many patients receiving outpatient treatment for mental illness, including the student responsible for the 2007 Virginia Tech shootings, deplore the side effects of the medications and choose not to take them.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
Sometimes men are the ones to take care of birth control through a surgical procedure. But when those men and their partners have a change of heart about children for any number of reasons, they seek to reverse their vasectomies. And that's usually possible, even long after the original procedure, says Dr. Brad Lerner, co-director of the Vasectomy Reversal Center of America a division of Chesapeake Urology. Lerner answers questions about getting and reversing a vasectomy. How common are vasectomies?
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
When retired Master Sgt. Sheryl A. Webb left the U.S. Army in 1997, she was scarcely aware of services that U.S. Veterans Administration hospitals offered specifically for women. That was well before women became the fastest growing demographic group within the U.S. veteran population, and before VA hospital officials made a concerted effort to get the word out about its women's services. On Friday, Webb marveled as she walked through the Women Veteran's Clinic inside the new $4.7 million Fort Meade VA Outpatient clinic.
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