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By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1994
It's billed as "The World's Smallest Real Estate Office," a converted outhouse in the historic Baltimore County mill town of Oella that will dispense information for Charles L. Wagandt's Oella Co."It's a very commodious single-seater," joked Mr. Wagandt, president of the company, which sells homes in the old mill village for $80,000 to $500,000.Yesterday, he presided over a ribbon-cutting in celebration of the 10th anniversary of Oella's restoration.While an outhouse-office might be a bizarre gimmick elsewhere, it's an apt image in the case of Oella, a 19th-century textile mill town across the Patapsco River from Ellicott City that only got indoor plumbing in 1984.
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EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | December 27, 2012
As more people occupy the same amount of land, things change. A generation or two ago, it was perfectly OK in Harford County to burn garbage and maintain a residential dumping pit on a rural property. It isn't all that long ago that the sewage system and stormwater system in Havre de Grace were one in the same, both emptying into the Susquehanna River largely untreated. Indeed, the city continues to deal with issues of separating the storm drains from sewerage lines under the roadways.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | February 8, 1993
When he goes out to give public talks about his hobby, Homer A. Allison puts on the orange pastel necktie with the hand-painted outhouse on it. It's probably the only one of its kind.But then, Mr. Allison is that rare breed of man who would wear a privy necktie in a public place. He's the sort of man who can speak at length and with authority on a topic that -- even in the age of Phil, Oprah, Geraldo, Sally and Maury -- gets little air time.For some years now, Mr. Allison, 67, a retired Air Force flight technician from Charles County, has been devoting a fair chunk of his time to outhouses.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 7, 2006
A nearly sold-out opening night and strong advance sales convinced the Annapolis Summer Garden folks that local audiences will welcome what is new, regardless of the weird title. In fact Urinetown, The Musical has found a snug environment here at Annapolis Summer Garden's intimate casual outdoor City Dock setting. It offers the cacophony of boat horns, revving motorcycle engines and occasional sirens as a distinctive counterpoint to the intriguing score of this 1999 fringe hit that debuted on Broadway in 2001.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 26, 1997
DELAWARE WATER GAP, Pa. -- There's a remarkable new building in the federal park in Pennsylvania: a two-hole outhouse, without running water, that cost the National Park Service at least $333,000.It's nestled amid evergreens, with a gabled slate roof, cottage-style porches, and a handsomely tapered cobblestone masonry foundation in the manner of Frank Lloyd Wright. A medley of wildflowers hides any sign of new construction.Inside each spacious restroom, a green horizontal stripe at baseboard level plays off the green of hemlocks visible through discreetly placed picture windows.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1994
A grand opening for an outhouse?That's what the residents of Oella staged this week to show off the newest and smallest, restoration project in this former mill town in western Baltimore County.Located near the intersection of Oella Avenue and Logtown Road, the wood frame building with the tilted metal roof is no ordinary outhouse. It's a deluxe "single-seater," used for many years by a weaver named William Moore, his wife Mabel, and their four children.It's also a high-tech outhouse, painstakingly restored to its original appearance but equipped with modern amenities such as a cellular phone.
FEATURES
By Karen Avenoso and Karen Avenoso,New York Daily News | August 14, 1993
NEW YORK -- Dali never dabbled in porcelain toilets. Picasso didn't paint Porta Potties. But who says a john can't inspire great art?"We wanted people to think about disposing of waste as a visual issue," said the Municipal Art Society's Tracy Calvan.Now, here's your chance. Some 300 designers -- from a Japanese architect to a Georgian surgeon -- answered the Urban Outhouse Design Competition's call for a "site-enhancing, self-cleaning" public toilet. Last summer, the JC Decaux public toilets made their big splash.
NEWS
February 21, 1991
Outhouse to the White House?Group launches tongue-in-cheek Schaefer effortTongues planted firmly in cheek, a dozen members of the Committee to Enforce Fair Treatment of Schaefer rallied today to "support" Gov. William Donald Schaefer's nascent bid for the presidency.Schaefer has said several times in recent weeks that he may seek the White House.Demonstrators today put miniature outhouses on their heads and bowed to college student Joe Rubin, who dressed in sweatpants, a robe and crown to play "King William Donald" for the rally outside the State House in Annapolis.
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | May 15, 1994
Some people go to a therapist every week.I get to write this column.Can you imagine? While others shell out big dough so they can share their inner-most thoughts, I get paid to share mine.For those who have been targets of my criticism, the wisdom of this arrangement may not be readily apparent. I've heard from you, and I know what you're thinking.All I ask is that you be sympathetic. After all, you're the doctor.And I do have burdens. What others perceive as a cushy job carries with it some heavy responsibilities.
NEWS
By KIRK S. NEVIN | July 19, 1993
I am fascinated by the revelations experienced by Kathleen McCarty (''Fireflies,'' Opinion * Commentary, July 2) during a recent power outage at her Baltimore home.Ms. McCarty and her son delighted in the secrets of the technologically imposed darkness: not just magical fireflies, but such wonders as urban silence, crescent moonsets and the long-forgotten comforts of family and neighborhood companionship.Perhaps Ms. McCarty would not be too surprised to learn that some other not-too-distant neighbors have chosen an ''unplugged'' lifestyle, not just for an hour a day, but for every delightful hour of every wonderful day.Our family has chosen to live ''off the grid.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
As hobbies go, privy hunting is not pretty. It's not like, say, remodeling a '55 Chevy. It takes a different searching soul to dedicate months to digging 8 feet down into century-old outhouses in search of ... what? And do we really want to unearth what is buried in those old pits? These aren't ancient art galleries, after all. Introducing Spencer Henderson, Baltimore privy hunter, different soul. Equipped with a rake and shovel, sensible work clothes, a "Police K-9" visor and a vibrant mustache, the 55-year-old Henderson spent his summer in the trenches of Fells Point.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 26, 1997
DELAWARE WATER GAP, Pa. -- There's a remarkable new building in the federal park in Pennsylvania: a two-hole outhouse, without running water, that cost the National Park Service at least $333,000.It's nestled amid evergreens, with a gabled slate roof, cottage-style porches, and a handsomely tapered cobblestone masonry foundation in the manner of Frank Lloyd Wright. A medley of wildflowers hides any sign of new construction.Inside each spacious restroom, a green horizontal stripe at baseboard level plays off the green of hemlocks visible through discreetly placed picture windows.
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | May 15, 1994
Some people go to a therapist every week.I get to write this column.Can you imagine? While others shell out big dough so they can share their inner-most thoughts, I get paid to share mine.For those who have been targets of my criticism, the wisdom of this arrangement may not be readily apparent. I've heard from you, and I know what you're thinking.All I ask is that you be sympathetic. After all, you're the doctor.And I do have burdens. What others perceive as a cushy job carries with it some heavy responsibilities.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1994
A grand opening for an outhouse?That's what the residents of Oella staged this week to show off the newest and smallest, restoration project in this former mill town in western Baltimore County.Located near the intersection of Oella Avenue and Logtown Road, the wood frame building with the tilted metal roof is no ordinary outhouse. It's a deluxe "single-seater," used for many years by a weaver named William Moore, his wife Mabel, and their four children.It's also a high-tech outhouse, painstakingly restored to its original appearance but equipped with modern amenities such as a cellular phone.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1994
It's billed as "The World's Smallest Real Estate Office," a converted outhouse in the historic Baltimore County mill town of Oella that will dispense information for Charles L. Wagandt's Oella Co."It's a very commodious single-seater," joked Mr. Wagandt, president of the company, which sells homes in the old mill village for $80,000 to $500,000.Yesterday, he presided over a ribbon-cutting in celebration of the 10th anniversary of Oella's restoration.While an outhouse-office might be a bizarre gimmick elsewhere, it's an apt image in the case of Oella, a 19th-century textile mill town across the Patapsco River from Ellicott City that only got indoor plumbing in 1984.
FEATURES
By Karen Avenoso and Karen Avenoso,New York Daily News | August 14, 1993
NEW YORK -- Dali never dabbled in porcelain toilets. Picasso didn't paint Porta Potties. But who says a john can't inspire great art?"We wanted people to think about disposing of waste as a visual issue," said the Municipal Art Society's Tracy Calvan.Now, here's your chance. Some 300 designers -- from a Japanese architect to a Georgian surgeon -- answered the Urban Outhouse Design Competition's call for a "site-enhancing, self-cleaning" public toilet. Last summer, the JC Decaux public toilets made their big splash.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | December 27, 2012
As more people occupy the same amount of land, things change. A generation or two ago, it was perfectly OK in Harford County to burn garbage and maintain a residential dumping pit on a rural property. It isn't all that long ago that the sewage system and stormwater system in Havre de Grace were one in the same, both emptying into the Susquehanna River largely untreated. Indeed, the city continues to deal with issues of separating the storm drains from sewerage lines under the roadways.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff Marina Sarris contributed to this story | February 11, 1991
With wooden outhouses in their pickup trucks, bags o manure in their hands and talk of secession on their lips, a band of angry Eastern Shore residents descended upon the State House today, demanding that Gov. William Donald Schaefer be held accountable for likening their region to an outdoor toilet."
NEWS
By KIRK S. NEVIN | July 19, 1993
I am fascinated by the revelations experienced by Kathleen McCarty (''Fireflies,'' Opinion * Commentary, July 2) during a recent power outage at her Baltimore home.Ms. McCarty and her son delighted in the secrets of the technologically imposed darkness: not just magical fireflies, but such wonders as urban silence, crescent moonsets and the long-forgotten comforts of family and neighborhood companionship.Perhaps Ms. McCarty would not be too surprised to learn that some other not-too-distant neighbors have chosen an ''unplugged'' lifestyle, not just for an hour a day, but for every delightful hour of every wonderful day.Our family has chosen to live ''off the grid.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | February 8, 1993
When he goes out to give public talks about his hobby, Homer A. Allison puts on the orange pastel necktie with the hand-painted outhouse on it. It's probably the only one of its kind.But then, Mr. Allison is that rare breed of man who would wear a privy necktie in a public place. He's the sort of man who can speak at length and with authority on a topic that -- even in the age of Phil, Oprah, Geraldo, Sally and Maury -- gets little air time.For some years now, Mr. Allison, 67, a retired Air Force flight technician from Charles County, has been devoting a fair chunk of his time to outhouses.
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