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NEWS
By Elizabeth Large | December 21, 2003
It's time to check your coat. Not to mention your boots, scarves, hats and gloves. Weather forecasters are predicting a colder and wetter than normal next couple of months, which doesn't sound good when you think about last winter. You're going to need outerwear that keeps you warm, in great looking styles that lift your spirits. If you're the type who thinks of a winter coat as a major investment, stick to a traditional black, navy, charcoal or brown wool and update it with trendy accessories.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Large | December 21, 2003
It's time to check your coat. Not to mention your boots, scarves, hats and gloves. Weather forecasters are predicting a colder and wetter than normal next couple of months, which doesn't sound good when you think about last winter. You're going to need outerwear that keeps you warm, in great looking styles that lift your spirits. If you're the type who thinks of a winter coat as a major investment, stick to a traditional black, navy, charcoal or brown wool and update it with trendy accessories.
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FEATURES
By Joe Surkiewicz | January 2, 1992
Once upon a time, buying a new winter coat often meant getting caught between the proverbial "rock and a hard place."The Rock: looking stylish. Sure, a leather bomber jacket oozes panache, but what happens when the mercury plummets below 40 degrees? Let's face it: A thin, waist-length garment simply doesn't do a great job at keeping out the cold.The Hard Place: staying warm. True, a thick, bulky goose-down coat outfitted with a fur-lined hood lets you laugh at the cold. But for most business and social wear, the Nanook-of-the-North look just doesn't cut it.Frustrating?
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2002
When it comes to fall dressing, the coat has long been fashion's neglected child. It's the afterthought that's casually tossed on after the outfit, shoes and purse have been carefully selected. It's the item of clothing women can't wait to doff the moment they arrive at a party. It's most valued for warmth, protection and (oh-so-tiresome) practicality. Not this fall. Call it the Year of the Coat. Because on the racks this season is a glorious array of outerwear made of paisley-printed velvet, patchwork denim and soft, distressed leathers in a dozen scrumptious browns.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 11, 2001
WILMINGTON, Del. - London Fog Industries Inc., the maker of its namesake raincoats and outerwear, is set to emerge from bankruptcy protection next week after shedding more than $100 million in debt, a lawyer for the company said yesterday. London Fog filed for bankruptcy protection in September 1999 after an aggressive plan to open retail stores hurt profit. The Seattle-based company, which formerly had its headquarters in Eldersburg, Md., and a factory in Baltimore, has since reorganized, closing 119 stores, mostly factory outlets, company officials said in February.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts | February 6, 1994
In a season when the weather can turn from brisk to blizzard, the choice of outerwear can be problematic. The practical answer is a shawl that can be tossed over a jacket or suit and then folded and stashed away. Women on the move have discovered the stylish potential in a swath of luxurious, unstructured fabric that wears comfortably and travels well.It can be a long stole, a poncho or a blanket-sized square doubled up in a triangle to wrap around the shoulders. A finish of deep fringe is a flippant stylish bonus, so learn to toss it lightly.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2002
When it comes to fall dressing, the coat has long been fashion's neglected child. It's the afterthought that's casually tossed on after the outfit, shoes and purse have been carefully selected. It's the item of clothing women can't wait to doff the moment they arrive at a party. It's most valued for warmth, protection and (oh-so-tiresome) practicality. Not this fall. Call it the Year of the Coat. Because on the racks this season is a glorious array of outerwear made of paisley-printed velvet, patchwork denim and soft, distressed leathers in a dozen scrumptious browns.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | January 23, 1992
Underwear as outerwearMadonna may have started it all several years ago when she began performing in bra tops and bustiers, but the idea of lingerie worn as outerwear has now taken on a life of its own. Bare little dresses cut like slips have become standard fare at the trendiest clubs and cocktail parties. Come spring, expect to XTC see even more lingerie-inspired party clothes -- dresses featuring built-in bras and delicate nylon lingerie lace edging necklines and shoulder straps.One of the most popular new fabric combinations also happens to be black lace layered over nude or blush-colored satin, a look hitherto more common in the boudoir than the ballroom.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | January 13, 1994
As part of its strategy to expand by targeting younger customers through casual attire, London Fog Corp. said yesterday that it will merge with a leading West Coast outerwear designer.London Fog also announced that it will close two of its raincoat manufacturing plants, including one in Washington County that employs 300 workers.London Fog's chairman, Arnold P. Cohen, called the merger a "perfect business marriage" that would give his company -- the nation's top manufacturer of raincoats -- a bigger share of the market in outerwear sold through discount outlets and clubs.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2001
While most of the apparel industry is suffering from lackluster business, Hampstead-based Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. said yesterday that its third-quarter sales increased 14.2 percent and that it will be reporting better-than-expected earnings for the period. Last month, the men's apparel retailer said it was on track to double its earnings per share, to 14 cents a share from 7 cents in last year's third quarter. Bank officials now expect to exceed that prediction. Bank is to report third-quarter results Nov. 19. The company also forecast a strong holiday season.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2001
While most of the apparel industry is suffering from lackluster business, Hampstead-based Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. said yesterday that its third-quarter sales increased 14.2 percent and that it will be reporting better-than-expected earnings for the period. Last month, the men's apparel retailer said it was on track to double its earnings per share, to 14 cents a share from 7 cents in last year's third quarter. Bank officials now expect to exceed that prediction. Bank is to report third-quarter results Nov. 19. The company also forecast a strong holiday season.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 11, 2001
WILMINGTON, Del. - London Fog Industries Inc., the maker of its namesake raincoats and outerwear, is set to emerge from bankruptcy protection next week after shedding more than $100 million in debt, a lawyer for the company said yesterday. London Fog filed for bankruptcy protection in September 1999 after an aggressive plan to open retail stores hurt profit. The Seattle-based company, which formerly had its headquarters in Eldersburg, Md., and a factory in Baltimore, has since reorganized, closing 119 stores, mostly factory outlets, company officials said in February.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2000
We're not being risque to say that former Colts kicker Toni Linhart doesn't like to wear much. The 57-year-old Timonium resident and native of Austria simply is impervious to the cold and has no need for a winter coat. Even during this week's near-blizzard conditions, he did without. Linhart, who runs a distribution company near PSINet Stadium, prefers cotton sweaters and tailored slacks and an occasional suit. He's on the tennis court daily at Greenspring Racquet Club, looking his best, as well, in solid whites, blacks, greens and reds.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1999
From the moment the man in the Look magazine ad stepped from the mist wrapped in a Dacron raincoat, an image was born. "Once in a Lifetime," the caption read. Orders for the revolutionary "maincoat" poured in.Forty-five years after London Fog Industries' trademark coat made its debut, the troubled outerwear manufacturer -- now in bankruptcy -- is pinning hopes for survival on that blue-chip image. But first, officials of the Eldersburg company say, London Fog is poised to radically remake itself.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
London Fog Industries Inc., a leading designer and marketer of rainwear and outerwear, has appointed the head of its casual outerwear division as the next chief executive officer, replacing a turnaround specialist brought in to stem losses and refocus the well-known brand.The Eldersburg manufacturer of London Fog raincoats and Pacific Trail casual clothes, which also runs 145 company-owned outlet stores, announced the promotion yesterday of William Dragon Jr., 56.Dragon had served since 1995 as president of Pacific Trail, a Seattle company London Fog acquired in April 1994.
FEATURES
By Susan Phinney and Susan Phinney,SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | January 1, 1998
Shopping for snow clothes is a lot like shopping for a sound system: Both involve myriad decisions.How many speakers? How many pockets?A tape deck? Taped seams? A multidisc player? Something multipurpose?Sound systems come with owners' manuals and directions. Snow clothes do not. And in today's high-tech clothing industry, manuals -- even maps -- would be nice.Try finding your way around a jacket, for example. What's that extra piece of lining hanging from the waist? (A snow skirt.)Why are there zippers in the armpits?
FEATURES
By Denise Cowie and Denise Cowie,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 14, 1995
Teddy Roosevelt went to them before he went on a year's safari to Africa.Adm. Richard Byrd checked in before he made his exploratory flights over the poles. As did Charles Lindbergh before he flew solo across the Atlantic; and Edmund Hillary, before he climbed Mount Everest.Amelia Earhart wore their gear. So did Ernest Hemingway and Gen. Douglas MacArthur and President Dwight Eisenhower.They outfitted America's flyboys in World Wars I and II and Claire Chennault's Flying Tigers before Pearl Harbor.
FEATURES
By Trish Donnally and Trish Donnally,San Francisco Chronicle | October 25, 1990
Paris--Super-sexy, fleshy fashions filled the French spring ready-to-wear collections.Leggings, cat suits, bike shorts, bras, corsets and slip dresses, mid-thigh or higher, are among the many underwear-as-outerwear looks for spring.Bright colors, black and white, and a parade of prints are in store. Spring boots are the surprising, and silly, accessory of the season.More dresses were cut for spring than we've seen in years.In his fashion show Tuesday, Emanuel Ungaro, who received the only standing ovation of the week, showed a flourish of dresses: snug, loose, solid, chintz, high or drop-waisted, in bright colors or pastels.
FEATURES
By Denise Cowie and Denise Cowie,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 14, 1995
Teddy Roosevelt went to them before he went on a year's safari to Africa.Adm. Richard Byrd checked in before he made his exploratory flights over the poles. As did Charles Lindbergh before he flew solo across the Atlantic; and Edmund Hillary, before he climbed Mount Everest.Amelia Earhart wore their gear. So did Ernest Hemingway and Gen. Douglas MacArthur and President Dwight Eisenhower.They outfitted America's flyboys in World Wars I and II and Claire Chennault's Flying Tigers before Pearl Harbor.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts | February 6, 1994
In a season when the weather can turn from brisk to blizzard, the choice of outerwear can be problematic. The practical answer is a shawl that can be tossed over a jacket or suit and then folded and stashed away. Women on the move have discovered the stylish potential in a swath of luxurious, unstructured fabric that wears comfortably and travels well.It can be a long stole, a poncho or a blanket-sized square doubled up in a triangle to wrap around the shoulders. A finish of deep fringe is a flippant stylish bonus, so learn to toss it lightly.
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