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By Chris Kaltenbach | July 17, 1997
An alien world is sending a spaceship to Earth, and it's warned us that anyone who comes near the landing site will be destroyed. Just what are these things? What are their intentions? And why are they so determined not to have us around?Those are the questions asked in "The Zanti Misfits," an episode of the "The Outer Limits" (noon-1 p.m., TNT) that was included last month in TV Guide's list of the 100 Greatest TV Episodes of All Time.The cast includes a very young Bruce Dern, and the Zantians, once they appear on screen, are pretty horrid looking (if somewhat cheesy -- hey, it was the early '60s)
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NEWS
September 1, 2006
Gerald Green, 84, author of The Last Angry Man, a 1956 book that told the story of a heroic doctor who worked in New York's slums, died Tuesday in Norwalk, Conn. The book - dedicated to Samuel Greenberg, the author's father who was a doctor in Brooklyn, N.Y. - was made into a movie in 1959 and starred Paul Muni. Mr. Green, who lived in New Canaan, Conn., was a writer, director and producer at NBC-TV in its early days. His experience helped him develop his novel's second main character, a TV producer who filmed documentaries.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
Its much-revered predecessor only lasted three seasons, so in one very important sense, Showtime's "The Outer Limits" has improved upon the original.Now in its fifth season, "Limits" will air its 100th episode Friday, a science-fiction morality tale about a time traveler who helps bring a war criminal to justice."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Rahner and Mark Rahner,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | March 25, 2004
There's particular joy in defying the Outer Limits Control Voice. You remember, the bossy one: "Do not attempt to adjust the picture. ... We are controlling transmission. ... We will control the vertical. We will control the horizontal. ... Sit quietly and we will control all that you see and hear." Oops. Just hit pause. Time to fast-forward, maybe skip a chapter on the DVD. Who's in control now, punk? I own you. MGM's two Outer Limits TV collections are part of the fastest-growing trend within the DVD explosion.
TRAVEL
By Les Picker and Les Picker,Special to the Sun | May 16, 1999
The sun is beginning to bake the sand under my feet to a grainy perfection. It's late morning as I walk along North Carolina's famous Outer Banks beaches near Duck. A family of dolphins frolics in the surf, paralleling my walk, sharing the plentiful fish of the longshore trenches with groups of fishermen sitting on beach chairs. Here and there, a few singles and couples lie on blankets, soaking in the sun's rays. Two young men are trying valiantly to stay on their surfboards, but instead get regularly thrown into the drink.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 5, 1997
William Shatner takes us where only tens of millions of viewers have gone before in "TV Guide Looks at Science Fiction" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., USA), a look at favorite science-fiction TV shows of all time. The list includes "Star Trek," "The Outer Limits," "The X-Files," "Space: 1999" and "Flash Gordon."Pub Date: 7/5/97
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Rahner and Mark Rahner,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | March 25, 2004
There's particular joy in defying the Outer Limits Control Voice. You remember, the bossy one: "Do not attempt to adjust the picture. ... We are controlling transmission. ... We will control the vertical. We will control the horizontal. ... Sit quietly and we will control all that you see and hear." Oops. Just hit pause. Time to fast-forward, maybe skip a chapter on the DVD. Who's in control now, punk? I own you. MGM's two Outer Limits TV collections are part of the fastest-growing trend within the DVD explosion.
NEWS
September 1, 2006
Gerald Green, 84, author of The Last Angry Man, a 1956 book that told the story of a heroic doctor who worked in New York's slums, died Tuesday in Norwalk, Conn. The book - dedicated to Samuel Greenberg, the author's father who was a doctor in Brooklyn, N.Y. - was made into a movie in 1959 and starred Paul Muni. Mr. Green, who lived in New Canaan, Conn., was a writer, director and producer at NBC-TV in its early days. His experience helped him develop his novel's second main character, a TV producer who filmed documentaries.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 11, 1997
Two elements could make tonight's episode of "The Outer Limits" (10 p.m.-10: 45 p.m., Showtime) especially memorable. Then again, they could make it lousy.One of the finest, most poignant and most resonant episodes of the original "Limits" was "A Feasibility Study," in which an entire square block of the Earth is transported to another planet, to see how Earthlings fare in the alien environment. The ending packed such an emotional wallop that the ABC censors were initially unwilling to let it air; they relented, however, and a TV classic was born.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Lawson and Terry Lawson,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | July 17, 2003
"You bet your sweet bippy." "Here come da judge." "Sock it to me." "V-e-r-r-r-r-y interesting." "The Flying Fickle Finger of Fate." With the possible exception of Seinfeld, no TV series introduced more -- or more annoying -- catchphrases into the popular lexicon than Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In. When first broadcast as a replacement series in January 1968, Laugh-In seemed revolutionary. But to anyone who wasn't there, The Best of Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In might seem archaic, a vaudeville throwback repainted in Day-Glo colors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Lawson and Terry Lawson,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | July 17, 2003
"You bet your sweet bippy." "Here come da judge." "Sock it to me." "V-e-r-r-r-r-y interesting." "The Flying Fickle Finger of Fate." With the possible exception of Seinfeld, no TV series introduced more -- or more annoying -- catchphrases into the popular lexicon than Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In. When first broadcast as a replacement series in January 1968, Laugh-In seemed revolutionary. But to anyone who wasn't there, The Best of Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In might seem archaic, a vaudeville throwback repainted in Day-Glo colors.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2001
The infectious music spiders into the subconscious. You realize your molecular structure has been irrevocably scrambled after you wake up in the morning humming a Shaggs song, humming this exactly: "Oh, the rich people want what the poor people's got And the poor people want what the rich people's got And the skinny people want what the fat people's got And the fat people want what the skinny people's got." Baltimore's Frank Zappa called the Shaggs "better than the Beatles." Rolling Stone magazine named the Shaggs' 1970 album, "Philosophy of the World," one of the most influential alternative records ever.
TRAVEL
By Les Picker and Les Picker,Special to the Sun | May 16, 1999
The sun is beginning to bake the sand under my feet to a grainy perfection. It's late morning as I walk along North Carolina's famous Outer Banks beaches near Duck. A family of dolphins frolics in the surf, paralleling my walk, sharing the plentiful fish of the longshore trenches with groups of fishermen sitting on beach chairs. Here and there, a few singles and couples lie on blankets, soaking in the sun's rays. Two young men are trying valiantly to stay on their surfboards, but instead get regularly thrown into the drink.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
Its much-revered predecessor only lasted three seasons, so in one very important sense, Showtime's "The Outer Limits" has improved upon the original.Now in its fifth season, "Limits" will air its 100th episode Friday, a science-fiction morality tale about a time traveler who helps bring a war criminal to justice."
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 13, 1998
WASHINGTON -- John Mankins' government career can be traced through the drawings on his office wall: a rocket whizzing from an Earth-based slingshot into outer space, a glittering moon colony, a giant bug-like contraption fueling a spacecraft in interstellar darkness.Crazy ideas? Not to Mankins. In his job at NASA, he is paid to come up with concepts so far-out they sometimes only get laughed at. Consider him one of NASA's sci-fi guys."I try to be reasonably conservative with my ideas," Mankins says, looking as though he hasjust come through a brainstorm, with his rumpled hair and government ID dangling askew.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 17, 1997
An alien world is sending a spaceship to Earth, and it's warned us that anyone who comes near the landing site will be destroyed. Just what are these things? What are their intentions? And why are they so determined not to have us around?Those are the questions asked in "The Zanti Misfits," an episode of the "The Outer Limits" (noon-1 p.m., TNT) that was included last month in TV Guide's list of the 100 Greatest TV Episodes of All Time.The cast includes a very young Bruce Dern, and the Zantians, once they appear on screen, are pretty horrid looking (if somewhat cheesy -- hey, it was the early '60s)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1996
"Tarantula." "Them." "The Amazing Colossal Man." They don't make movies like that anymore, but they do make movies that pay tribute to the days when a producer like William Castle could take a bad sci-fi flick, advertise it on a wonderfully lurid poster and lure hundreds of kids to the Saturday matinees. Watch ABC tonight."Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- The Rev. Johnson (Geoffrey Lower) discovers he may not be the best man to open up a school on the local Indian reservation.
SPORTS
By Maryalice Yakutchik and Maryalice Yakutchik,Contributing Writer | May 15, 1995
Having completed the Ironman triathlon a record-setting 15 times, Lyn Brooks of Towson had hit "the wall" before. But until Eco-Challenge, a 300-mile race through canyons, deserts and rivers in Southern Utah, she never had encountered one that was 400 feet high.A free rappel into a canyon from 40 stories up was a high point for Brooks, a member of Team Mountain Dew, which invested about $30,000 and spent six months planning and training for the inaugural Eco-Challenge.The low point came halfway through the 10-day event.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 11, 1997
Two elements could make tonight's episode of "The Outer Limits" (10 p.m.-10: 45 p.m., Showtime) especially memorable. Then again, they could make it lousy.One of the finest, most poignant and most resonant episodes of the original "Limits" was "A Feasibility Study," in which an entire square block of the Earth is transported to another planet, to see how Earthlings fare in the alien environment. The ending packed such an emotional wallop that the ABC censors were initially unwilling to let it air; they relented, however, and a TV classic was born.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 5, 1997
William Shatner takes us where only tens of millions of viewers have gone before in "TV Guide Looks at Science Fiction" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., USA), a look at favorite science-fiction TV shows of all time. The list includes "Star Trek," "The Outer Limits," "The X-Files," "Space: 1999" and "Flash Gordon."Pub Date: 7/5/97
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