Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOuter Banks
IN THE NEWS

Outer Banks

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
Baltimore Sun reporter | February 10, 2012
Nags Head, N.C., is on the northern peninsula of the Outer Banks. Its unspoiled beaches are free, with plenty of parking available. The inimitable pink-blue sunsets and charming mom-and-pop establishments help it to sustain an unaffected, wholesome vibe. Getting there Nags Head is about 325 miles from Baltimore. You can fly Southwest Airlines nonstop into Norfolk, then rent a car for the remaining 88 miles. Most folks contend it's easier, and cheaper, to make the trip by car, about a six-hour drive.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 8, 2014
The clueless writer of your editorial "The Harris boycott" (July 7) totally blew off the fact that Washington, D.C., exists on federal money, and possession of marijuana is still a federal crime. You accused Rep. Andy Harris of not caring for the concerns of others, yet you support Gov. Martin O'Malley's constant thievery of taxpayers' pocketbooks, even though there are actual statewide polls that show that these taxes are not wanted. As for the boycott, that's another liberal joke.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
By Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2010
With more than 300 miles of coastline, the Outer Banks has stretches of sand that are consistently rated among the top beaches in the world — a perfect setting whether you crave an active vacation or a simple barefoot walk along empty beaches. The long stretch of beaches is a six- or seven-hour drive from Baltimore, and the sense of place can change markedly from one milepost to the next. For a family with school-age children, the beaches from Duck to Nag's Head pulse with activity.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Hurricane Arthur is expected to brush the Outer Banks of North Carolina early on the Fourth of July, but forecasts are only taking it further from the Delmarva coast after that. Hurricane warnings are in effect for coastal North Carolina, and the storm could pack 85 mph winds by the time its outer bands reach land early Friday. Arthur had 80 mph winds and was 300 miles southwest of Cape Hatteras as of 8 a.m. Thursday. Authorities had on Wednesday begun closing campgrounds, lighthouses and beaches on the Outer Banks of North Carolina.
NEWS
By Sophia Terbush and Sophia Terbush,sophia.terbush@baltsun.com | May 13, 2009
From crabbing, fishing and kiteboarding to major historical sites like the Wright Brothers National Memorial, where the duo achieved their dream of flight, North Carolina's Outer Banks has more to offer than long white beaches and warm summer breezes. There's romance in Rodanthe, kites in Kitty Hawk and concerts in Corolla. Best of all, there are free, family-friendly events throughout the 100 miles of barrier islands, from festivals to fireworks displays. This summer, a trip to the Outer Banks can cost less than you think.
FEATURES
By Christopher Corbett and Christopher Corbett,Contributing Writer Universal Press Syndicate | December 5, 1993
At the turn of the century, Capt. William J. Tate was the postmaster at Kitty Hawk, then an isolated outpost on the sandy barrens of North Carolina's Outer Banks. Descended from a Scottish shipwreck survivor on a coast known as "the graveyard of the Atlantic," Capt. Tate worked variously for the U.S. Lifesaving Service, was a notary public and served as a Currituck County commissioner. But he was chiefly, in the words of one historian, "a one-man chamber of commerce" whose greatest success was in public relations.
NEWS
By Jason Skog and Jason Skog,Special to the Sun | May 16, 2007
In the Outer Banks, the beaches are the star attraction. Just off the North Carolina coast, the chain of barrier islands stretches more than 90 miles. And for inhabitants and visitors in the 15 towns along the Outer Banks, the beaches rank among the nation's best. With quiet bays to the west and the Atlantic Ocean to the east, the Outer Banks offers panoramic water views everywhere you look. Rental homes make up the bulk of the accommodations in the Outer Banks - from quaint cottages to multimillion-dollar estates with pools, spas and game rooms.
NEWS
By JASON SKOG and JASON SKOG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 2006
A narrow chain of barrier islands, North Carolina's Outer Banks offers panoramic views of the Atlantic Ocean on one side and serene bays and waterways on the other, as well as wildlife refuges and maritime woodlands. The area also includes Kitty Hawk, the birthplace of flight, and Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The Outer Banks has 15 towns along the length of the islands. Dining, recreation and shopping opportunities are growing, thanks to a recent building boom. Where to stay Most Outer Banks visitors stay in one of the abundant vacation homes, many of which are worth more than $1 million and feature five, six or seven bedrooms, in-ground pools, hot tubs and modern kitchens.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Staff Writer | September 1, 1993
KILL DEVIL HILLS, N.C. -- First came the quiet.At Jockey's Ridge early yesterday, the only movement was the flapping of flags atop boarded-up businesses.Even the brown pelicans and squawking seagulls had abandoned the Avalon Fishing Pier. And then came the fury.Emily arrived, swooping and swirling along the southernmost Outer Banks with heavy rains and winds up to 115 mph.Early last evening the hurricane's center was about 30 miles northeast of Cape Hatteras. It was moving north about 13 mph and was expected to veer northeast.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 21, 2003
NAGS HEAD, N.C. - The Fenz family rode out Hurricane Isabel's fury in the manager's quarters of their 45-room oceanfront motel. Jim and Wanda Fenz figured their 7-month-old daughter would cry when the howling 100 mph winds began, but Tiffany wasn't bothered by the racket at all. Her parents think maybe it's because the baby had something in common with the storm: Tiffany's middle name is Isabella. "It's her first hurricane," Wanda Fenz said. "We've already entered it into her baby book."
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
The latest forecasts for Tropical Storm Arthur show it well off the coast of the Delmarva peninsula as it passes by on the Fourth of July, but before that it could brush the Outer Banks as a Category 1 hurricane. The National Hurricane Center's predictions show the storm well off Maryland and Delaware's Atlantic coasts during the day on Friday. That could lead to dangerous rip currents and rough surf for the Independence Day holiday, but should keep strong winds out to sea. The North Carolina coast is meanwhile under a tropical storm warning, with a hurricane watch in place as well.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Storms and heavy rain are forecast Thursday and Friday as a front of cool, dry air and Tropical Storm Arthur converge over the Mid-Atlantic, disrupting Fourth of July fireworks plans in Ocean City but clearing out the heat and humidity for the holiday weekend. Even though Arthur is expected to pass well off the coast, the storm prompted Ocean City officials to reschedule the town's fireworks show from Friday to Saturday. Lifeguards also cautioned that the storm would kick up dangerous surf and rip currents.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
In 2006, the Baltimore funk-jam band Pigeons Playing Ping Pong started from a modest and typical beginning: Two new friends - Greg Ormont and Jeremy Schon - playing acoustic guitar together in a University of Maryland dorm room. The duo took their songs to coffee shops and open-mic nights around campus, and a year later, added drummer Dan Schwartz and bassist Ben Carrey to complete the act.  Since then, Pigeons have lived on the road (Ormont said the group played 196 shows in 2013)
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Tropical Storm Arthur, the season's first Atlantic tropical cyclone, formed by 11 a.m. Tuesday and is headed up the East Coast. But its potential impact on July 4 celebrations remains unclear. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 40 mph and was about 100 miles southeast of Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane forecasters expect it to take a northeasterly track, brushing over North Carolina's Outer Banks and the Delmarva peninsula Friday, potentially at hurricane strength. Thunderstorms are expected to be likely in Ocean City from late Thursday through Friday afternoon, according to the National Weather Service.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
The season's first tropical storm is expected to brush the mid-Atlantic coast just in time for the Fourth of July, but it is a cold front helping steer the system offshore that could deliver storms and heavy downpours before a cooler, drier holiday Friday. Hot, humid air over the region for the middle of the week is forecast to fuel storm chances through Thursday night. Oppressive levels of moisture in the air prompted Baltimore City officials to declare the summer's first "code red" heat advisory Wednesday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
A rainy system off the coast of Florida could become Tropical Storm Arthur and sweep up the East Coast late this week into the weekend. The National Hurricane Center expects a 60 percent chance that shower and thunderstorm activity over the Bahamas will organize into Tropical Storm Arthur within 48 hours, and 80 percent chances it will do so within the next five days. It's too early for the center to suggest any forecast cone showing any storm's possible trajectory, but forecasting models predict the system being pulled up the coast.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2000
COROLLA, N.C. - Edward Collings Knight Jr. was a railroad executive and amateur artist who "exhibited more talent at spending money than making it." Marie Louise LeBel was his foul-mouthed, hard-drinking wife, who thought nothing of killing a neighbor's dog with a shot from her pearl-handled pistol. The couple caused quite an uproar in the early 1920s, when they arrived on North Carolina's Outer Banks to hunt ducks and geese in Currituck Sound. But that was nothing compared to the fury that erupted when the menfolk barred Marie Knight from joining their hunting clubs because of her gender.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2012
Baltimore Charm player Kelly Campbell travels frequently in her dual role as a defensive back and marketing manager of the city's all-female Lingerie Football League team. Campbell was nominated this year for the league's award for most improved player, as well as for its Mortaza Award, honoring a player's efforts on and off the field. Campbell says she prefers vacations at beaches, where she can enjoy the activities she doesn't have time for during the football season. With Valentine's Day on the horizon, Campbell, 24, reveals to us her favorite and most romantic getaway — which would also be her ideal spot to receive a proposal.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
Forecasters expect diminished chances of severe weather in the Baltimore area Thursday, with cloud cover keeping temperatures down, but some storms and showers are still expected. Meteorologists shifted an area of concern for severe storms southward, in an area from tidewater Virginia to North Carolina's Outer Banks, instead of over Maryland, according to the Storm Prediction Center. Some scattered storms and showers are still possible, however. Temperatures hovered around 80 degrees through early Thursday afternoon, about 10 degrees cooler than forecasters had predicted.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
Oliver L. Hoffman Jr., a retired steel company executive who enjoyed watersports, died April 11 of complications from Parkinson's disease at his Arnold home. He was 87. The son of Oliver Lee Hoffman, a coal company executive, and Mayme Manges Hoffman, a homemaker, Oliver Lee Hoffman Jr. was born and raised in Windber, Pa., where he graduated from Windber High School in 1944. From 1944 to 1946, he served in the Army Air Corps at Gettysburg College. After leaving the service, he attended Carnegie Tech, which is now Carnegie Mellon University, where he studied civil engineering on the GI Bill.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.