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NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | October 14, 1993
If you'd bottled the excitement Monday morning at Glenwood Middle School, you would have had a natural high grand enough to thrill all of Howard County.The sixth-graders, their teachers, and a handful of adventuresome parents were loading buses to go to Outdoor Education, a three-day event at Summit Lake in Frederick County that the sixth grade enjoys each fall. They stay in cabins two nights and participate in outdoor activities and instruction for three days.Tuesday's rain didn't dampen the spirits of these energetic campers, who worked in teams and played hard in organized games.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | November 1, 2009
She sees herself as lucky to be part of a seminal moment in her field's history. But environmental educator Bronwyn Mitchell helped make that moment happen. Nine months ago, when she became executive director of the Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education, Mitchell knew the influential nonprofit organization would be celebrating 25 years of existence in 2010. She also knew Americans have generally come around to realizing that a passion for the environment need not be the sole preserve of a few neo-hippie types.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2000
At the Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center in Millersville, Stephen Barry gazes at a framed photograph that hangs on a wall in the center's main building. In the picture, a young man hunches over papers on a picnic table in the woods. He appears to be giving directions to a group of younger men gathered around him. Barry said he hopes to include more at-risk students in outdoor education programs. "I think I've always been an advocate for students," he said. "My goal has been to connect with them and empower them to learn.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | November 1, 2009
She sees herself as lucky to be part of a seminal moment in her field's history. But environmental educator Bronwyn Mitchell helped make that moment happen. Nine months ago, when she became executive director of the Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education, Mitchell knew the influential nonprofit organization would be celebrating 25 years of existence in 2010. She also knew Americans have generally come around to realizing that a passion for the environment need not be the sole preserve of a few neo-hippie types.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | November 1, 2009
She sees herself as lucky to be part of a seminal moment in her field's history. But environmental educator Bronwyn Mitchell helped make that moment happen. Nine months ago, when she became executive director of the Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education, Mitchell knew the influential nonprofit organization would be celebrating 25 years of existence in 2010. She also knew Americans have generally come around to realizing that a passion for the environment need not be the sole preserve of a few neo-hippie types.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2002
Eleven-year-old Seth Lippa clung to a sheer rock face last week, 25 feet above ground. The youngster called down to Patapsco Valley State Park naturalist David Chrest, who wore a harness and rope attached to his climbing gear. Seth was ready to come down. This is the second year that Seth, an Elkridge resident, has climbed the wall. He is a participant in the park's Junior Rangers program for ages 8 to 13. "It's fun rock climbing," Seth said, adding that he enjoyed climbing so much last summer that he signed up again.
NEWS
June 15, 2005
About 150 pupils from South Shore and Edgewater elementary schools waded waist-deep into the waters of the Severn River on Monday morning to plant redhead grass along the riverbed. The mass planting was the culmination of a series of projects the pupils have worked on all year through the Chesapeake Connections program. Sponsored by the state Department of Natural Resources, the program is designed to educate pupils and get them involved in keeping the Chesapeake Bay healthy. The pupils grew the grass, one of the few aquatic plants recovering from the pollution and nutrient overload in the river, said Stephen Barry, coordinator of outdoor education for the school system.
NEWS
By Jal Mehta and Jal Mehta,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1996
A local environmental committee is asking the community to help select a person or group that has made the county a better place to live to receive the second annual Jan Hollmann Award.The award is intended for someone who "has made a significant contribution to environmental education," said L. Eugene Cronin, a member of the committee and former chairman of the Severn River Commission.Hollmann was one of Anne Arundel County's foremost environmental activists before her death from cancer in 1990.
NEWS
December 8, 1991
Name: Brad W. RogersHonored by The Carroll County Sun for: Beingrecognized as the Hashawha/Bear Branch Advisory Council's co-volunteer of the year for contributing to the center's programming efforts over the past two years and working behind the scenes to ensure the success of a number of environmental initiativesAge: 21Residence; hometown: TaneytownEducation: Currentlya junior at Western Maryland College; graduate of Middletown High School North in...
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1995
At Harford Glen outdoor education center, fifth-graders tramp through the forest looking for salamanders. They sneak up on sunbathing turtles. They fashion mini-beaver dams out of mud and sticks.Those are just a few of the experiences for Harford students when they come to the school system's outdoor education reserve.The park's 360 acres of forest, marshes and streams provide hands-on lessons in wildlife preservation, beaver ecology and more.But Harford Glen offers more than nature lessons.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | March 16, 2008
For almost two decades, Jack Shagena has volunteered at Harford Glen Environmental Education Center. During that time, he helped start the Harford Glen Foundation and built three bridges, a log cabin and picnic tables. "I got involved at Harford Glen because I felt the outdoor education was very important for fifth-graders to learn about the environment," Shagena said. Recently Shagena took his interest to the next level when he completed Harford Glen: An Outdoor Classroom & Preserve, a history about the Harford Glen Environmental Education Center and a fundraiser for the Harford Glen Foundation.
NEWS
June 15, 2005
About 150 pupils from South Shore and Edgewater elementary schools waded waist-deep into the waters of the Severn River on Monday morning to plant redhead grass along the riverbed. The mass planting was the culmination of a series of projects the pupils have worked on all year through the Chesapeake Connections program. Sponsored by the state Department of Natural Resources, the program is designed to educate pupils and get them involved in keeping the Chesapeake Bay healthy. The pupils grew the grass, one of the few aquatic plants recovering from the pollution and nutrient overload in the river, said Stephen Barry, coordinator of outdoor education for the school system.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2003
Ten years ago, Ruth and Frances Brown willed their 300-year-old family farm to the Howard County Conservancy. The sisters, who had been schoolteachers in the area, wanted Mount Pleasant preserved and used for outdoor education. This week, in keeping with the Browns' vision, the conservancy formalized a partnership with Howard County public schools. During a reception on the porch of the original farmhouse, conservancy President J. Edward Tillman said, "We think the Brown sisters, who were teachers, would be very happy to see us in this mode."
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2003
Ten years ago, Ruth and Frances Brown willed their 300-year-old family farm to the Howard County Conservancy. The sisters, who had been schoolteachers in the area, wanted Mount Pleasant preserved and used for outdoor education. This week, in keeping with the Browns' vision, the conservancy formalized a partnership with Howard County public schools. During a reception on the porch of the original farmhouse, conservancy President J. Edward Tillman said, "We think the Brown sisters, who were teachers, would be very happy to see us in this mode."
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2002
Eleven-year-old Seth Lippa clung to a sheer rock face last week, 25 feet above ground. The youngster called down to Patapsco Valley State Park naturalist David Chrest, who wore a harness and rope attached to his climbing gear. Seth was ready to come down. This is the second year that Seth, an Elkridge resident, has climbed the wall. He is a participant in the park's Junior Rangers program for ages 8 to 13. "It's fun rock climbing," Seth said, adding that he enjoyed climbing so much last summer that he signed up again.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2000
At the Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center in Millersville, Stephen Barry gazes at a framed photograph that hangs on a wall in the center's main building. In the picture, a young man hunches over papers on a picnic table in the woods. He appears to be giving directions to a group of younger men gathered around him. Barry said he hopes to include more at-risk students in outdoor education programs. "I think I've always been an advocate for students," he said. "My goal has been to connect with them and empower them to learn.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | March 16, 2008
For almost two decades, Jack Shagena has volunteered at Harford Glen Environmental Education Center. During that time, he helped start the Harford Glen Foundation and built three bridges, a log cabin and picnic tables. "I got involved at Harford Glen because I felt the outdoor education was very important for fifth-graders to learn about the environment," Shagena said. Recently Shagena took his interest to the next level when he completed Harford Glen: An Outdoor Classroom & Preserve, a history about the Harford Glen Environmental Education Center and a fundraiser for the Harford Glen Foundation.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1996
As a North County High School science teacher, Valerie C. Wesner raises hundreds of fish and the environmental consciousness of her students every year.Her work has won her the second annual Jan Hollmann Environmental Education Award.The award is named for one of Anne Arundel County's foremost environmental activists, who died in 1990. The honor recognizes significant, long-term contributions in environmental education.Wesner said though she knew North County science department chairman Frank Utley had nominated her, she was surprised when told Monday that she had won."
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1999
It wasn't chemistry that brought together Corinne Parks and Lloyd Tydings, but entomology.The friends not only see eye to eye with each other, but with New Guinea stick insects, fuzzy tarantulas, Madagascar hissing cockroaches and other esteemed members of the phylum Arthropoda, which includes all invertebrates with jointed limbs, segmented bodies and exoskeletons.Neither Parks nor Tydings thinks twice about clutching creepy crawlies or keeping black widows as pets. But when an Australian stick insect lays a seed-like egg from its pyracantha perch, the "two bugs in a rug" are thrilled to pieces.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1996
As a North County High School science teacher, Valerie C. Wesner raises hundreds of fish and the environmental consciousness of her students every year.Her work has won her the second annual Jan Hollmann Environmental Education Award.The award is named for one of Anne Arundel County's foremost environmental activists, who died in 1990. The honor recognizes significant, long-term contributions in environmental education.Wesner said though she knew North County science department chairman Frank Utley had nominated her, she was surprised when told Monday that she had won."
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