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Outcomes Based Education

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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | September 2, 1994
The differences among the 11 candidates for Board of Education surfaced most vividly when they answered a question about outcomes-based education last night, at a forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Carroll County.Candidates were asked to describe the positive and negative aspects of outcomes-based education. Most, however, saw it as positive or negative, rather than both.Outcomes-based education means setting specific goals for what students are to be able to know by the end of a unit, course and their schooling.
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NEWS
By Craig Schulze | June 3, 1998
THE students were all on task, the building was spic-and-span and sprightly decorated, and the teachers were virtually pouring themselves into their lessons. In short, it was the kind of day made for smiles when the assistant superintendent came calling at Baltimore's William Pinderhughes Elementary School some 20 years ago. The only problem was that when the visit was over, our honored guest was wearing a frown.It seems that to provide a little privacy for their classes, several teachers had erected some makeshift barriers to divide up their shared open space.
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1994
The pot still boils over with questions and concerns about outcomes-based education, as Carroll schools staff take their show on the road to explain the approach to the community, one civic group at a time.At the latest in a series of talks to community groups, Gary Dunkleberger, director of curriculum, and Runnymede Elementary School Principal Barbara Walker spoke to about 20 members of the West Carroll Republican Club last night at St. Paul United Methodist Church in New Windsor.One man said he disliked the concept even more after their talk.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Anne Haddad and Sheridan Lyons and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1996
The candy-cane-striped poles went up first, then a series of red-and-white signs touting a conservative line aimed at Carroll County's impending school board elections.Appearing in Finksburg a few at a time, the signs with sequential political messages have intrigued motorists for more than a week.But they are illegal, according to the State Highway Administration.Campaign signs are protected under the First Amendment and recent court cases, said Gary Bowman, chief of the SHA's outdoor advertising section.
NEWS
October 26, 1993
For many parents of Maryland's school-aged children the phrase "outcomes-based education" means nothing. In a few counties, however, this new educational theory, which is gaining in popularity across the country, has ignited a fierce battle over control of the schools and their curriculum.In simplest form, outcomes-based education revolves around clear statements of standards students are required to meet to pass a course, move to the next grade and graduate. Reporter Anne Haddad of The Evening Sun's bureau in Carroll County, where the debate over this has been heated, found a parent who succinctly summarized the shortcomings of the current approach: "All we have now is 'input' education.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | October 14, 1993
Carroll school officials have deflated two arguments used by opponents of outcomes-based education, an approach that has sparked nationwide controversy from conservatives who say it will impose liberal values on their children.The authors of two "studies" cited by the opponents have written to the Board of Education to say their work is being misrepresented.Outcomes-based education is an approach that sets specific standards students have to meet at the end of each course and by the time they graduate.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | September 8, 1993
A new parent group called PROBE has formed to support the outcomes approach to education in Carroll County.The group will make its debut at the county school board meeting at 9 a.m. today in Room 271 of the Courthouse Annex, 55 N. Court St."The group has formed to help support what the Carroll County school system is doing to implement exit outcomes and outcomes-based education," said M. Lynn Earp, of Westminster. Our mission is to help the parent community at large have a better understanding of what exit outcomes are really about.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | November 8, 1994
The school board is scheduled to choose a new director of curriculum, the person who will play a key role in what goes on in Carroll County classrooms, at tomorrow's regular meeting.The board meeting convenes at 9 a.m. at Westminster High School.The last person to hold the position was Gary Dunkleberger, whom Superintendent Brian Lockard promoted to assistant superintendent for instruction in September.The position is one that oversees supervisors in each subject area, as well as elementary and special education supervisors.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | November 9, 1994
Incumbent Carolyn L. Scott won back her seat on the Carroll County Board of Education last night. Gary W. Bauer of Hampstead came in second, but in such a close finish that the 1,650 uncounted absentee ballots could change the result.With all precincts reporting, Ms. Scott won with 28.2 percent of the vote.Following were Mr. Bauer with 24.48 percent, Laura E. Albers with 23.75 percent and Carole M. "Cyd" Pecoraro with 23.42 percent. Only a few hundred votes separated the three candidates.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1994
Incumbent Carolyn L. Scott led the field of 11 candidates for Carroll County Board of Education, despite several of those running who criticized her and her colleagues as part of their campaigns.With 32 of the 41 precincts reporting, Ms. Scott had 19.37 percent of the vote.The three candidates closest behind her were Laura E. Albers with 12.94 percent, Carole M. "Cyd" Pecoraro with 11.95 percent and Gary W. Bauer with 11.91 percent.The four candidates will face off in the general election for the two available seats.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | July 30, 1995
OAKLAND -- Garrett County's voters gave control of their schools to the Christian right in November, and ever since, the mission of public education has been the hottest talk everywhere you turn here.It's not because of wholesale changes in curricula or Bible-thumping lectures that might conform to some stereotypical images of what Christian fundamentalists want in public schools. Nothing like that has happened -- although some fear it will.Even so, it's a new school day for Maryland's westernmost county, which has become the first in the state, and among a small but growing number of places nationally, where the Christian right has won control of policy-making for a public school system.
NEWS
April 19, 1995
For a sense of how complex educating young people has become, consider the report on elementary education released last week by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.This study received plenty of media attention as the largest of its kind into elementary education. It criticizes the tendency of modern education to embrace a fad-of-the-month and suggests a "basic school" whose components we can agree on. But defining "basic" is the rub.The Carnegie report calls for four things: Greater stress on reading and language skills; a focus on core civic virtues such as honesty and respect for others; more time for creative learning and teacher planning, and strengthening school communities by keeping schools and classes small.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | November 9, 1994
Incumbent Carolyn L. Scott won back her seat on the Carroll County Board of Education last night. Gary W. Bauer of Hampstead came in second, but in such a close finish that the 1,650 uncounted absentee ballots could change the result.With all precincts reporting, Ms. Scott won with 28.2 percent of the vote.Following were Mr. Bauer with 24.48 percent, Laura E. Albers with 23.75 percent and Carole M. "Cyd" Pecoraro with 23.42 percent. Only a few hundred votes separated the three candidates.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | November 8, 1994
The school board is scheduled to choose a new director of curriculum, the person who will play a key role in what goes on in Carroll County classrooms, at tomorrow's regular meeting.The board meeting convenes at 9 a.m. at Westminster High School.The last person to hold the position was Gary Dunkleberger, whom Superintendent Brian Lockard promoted to assistant superintendent for instruction in September.The position is one that oversees supervisors in each subject area, as well as elementary and special education supervisors.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | November 7, 1994
A comfortable lead in the primary will probably assure Carolyn L. Scott of re-election to her school board seat tomorrow, but which of the other three candidates will win the second seat is anyone's call.The other candidates shared very close percentages in the primary. With Ms. Scott carrying about 19 percent of the vote, Laura E. Albers came in second with 13 percent, and Carole M. "Cyd" Pecoraro and Gary W. Bauer came in third and fourth, respectively, at about 12 percent each.But that was a primary, which draws fewer voters than a general election, and it was based on a large field of 11 candidates, with the delineations not quite as clear as they are now with the four contenders.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | September 26, 1994
While administrators and teachers draft the curriculum in a widening circle around them, Gregory Putman and his cohorts in the class of 2000 just go about their school days.For example, Greg, whom The Sun has followed every year as a representative of his class, is unfamiliar with the term "outcomes-based education."Yet that topic takes up hours of school board meetings and is the top issue in the school board race.Greg, 12, lives in the High Ridge development in Gamber with his parents, Pamela and Richard, and his brother Grant, 14.Whether or not he knows the term, Greg is getting an outcomes-based education in the seventh grade at Westminster West Middle School.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | August 29, 1993
Gary Dunkleberger wants to set the record straight, once and for all.Carroll teachers are not going to be promoting a homosexual lifestyle to students in their outcomes-based education, said Dr. Dunkleberger, the director of curriculum and staff development for the county's public schools.He also wants to clear up what he termed "misinformation" circulated by Carroll County Citizens for Quality Education, an activist group formed last spring out of dissatisfaction over a revised curriculum based on "exit outcomes."
NEWS
September 15, 1994
Anyone looking for a theme from Tuesday's primary vote in Carroll County better keep looking. It is possible that the light turnout -- 43 percent of the registered Republicans and 38 percent of the Democrats even bothered -- muddled the message. It is also possible that a great deal of unfocused anger at public officials manifested itself in strange ways.Voters are apparently ready to end Thomas E. Hickman's contentious career as state's attorney. After four terms, they seem to have given the GOP nomination to Jerry F. Barnes by the narrowest of margins.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1994
Incumbent Carolyn L. Scott led the field of 11 candidates for Carroll County Board of Education, despite several of those running who criticized her and her colleagues as part of their campaigns.With 32 of the 41 precincts reporting, Ms. Scott had 19.37 percent of the vote.The three candidates closest behind her were Laura E. Albers with 12.94 percent, Carole M. "Cyd" Pecoraro with 11.95 percent and Gary W. Bauer with 11.91 percent.The four candidates will face off in the general election for the two available seats.
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