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NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun staff writer | May 7, 2009
The former home of the company that invented the Ouija board, the estate of Calvert School's first headmaster and one of the city's last Masonic temples are among 12 buildings that have joined Baltimore's official landmark list. Marking May as "Preservation Month," Mayor Sheila Dixon held a news conference Wednesday morning at which she signed legislation adding the buildings to the landmark list and opened an exhibit about them in the North Gallery of City Hall. The additions bring to 153 the number of buildings that have individual city landmark designation, a status that helps protect them from demolition or defacement.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
I'd like to go to church this morning, Pentecost and all that, but there are all those people circling the house, pounding feebly at the door, and pleading for the answers to yesterday's quiz on word nerdiness. Here you are: the original ten sentences, the identification of the problems they present, and a note on scoring your nerdity at the end.    1. A rapidly developing drought and unseasonably hot weather throughout Maryland has stolen the early promise of this year's wet spring, parching lawns and gardens and raising fears among farmers of a return to the disastrously dry years of the mid-1980s.     Subject-verb agreement: drought and weather constitute a compound subject, so the verb has to be have stolen .    2. Although boys do get lice, they tend to prefer females.
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NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2008
Perhaps if Bob Murch had thought to ask his first Ouija board, it might have told him what was ahead: meandering trips through dank graveyards, hours of rooting through archives for patent files and court transcripts, landing in the middle - and helping resolve - a nearly 100-year feud between the families of the two Baltimore brothers who marketed the "all-knowing" slab of wood. But he didn't, and 15 years later, he's still immersed in his quest to document the history of "The Mystifying Oracle" - that diviner of the future, that gateway to the spirit world, that simple lettered board, born in Baltimore, that went on to become an icon of both pop culture and occult subculture.
NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun staff writer | May 7, 2009
The former home of the company that invented the Ouija board, the estate of Calvert School's first headmaster and one of the city's last Masonic temples are among 12 buildings that have joined Baltimore's official landmark list. Marking May as "Preservation Month," Mayor Sheila Dixon held a news conference Wednesday morning at which she signed legislation adding the buildings to the landmark list and opened an exhibit about them in the North Gallery of City Hall. The additions bring to 153 the number of buildings that have individual city landmark designation, a status that helps protect them from demolition or defacement.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK | February 5, 1995
Baltimore proudly touts its American firsts: first Roman Catholic cathedral (1821), first railroad (1827), first shot tower (1828), first dental college (1840), first Ouija board (1892), first rubber gloves used in surgery (1894), even the first permanent building topped with a revolving restaurant (Holiday Inn, 1964).There's another first that one hears much less about. Baltimore was the first U.S. city to pass a residential segregation ordinance (1911) that limited the places blacks could live.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1997
DENTON -- "Caroline County came in first, unfortunately," sighed Margaret Myers, president of the three-member County Commission during yesterday's meeting.The "first" -- Caroline County's property assessments increased more than any other in the state last year -- has angered a lot of property owners and stirred up a small furor in this rural mid-Shore county, known for its rich soil and productive vegetable farms.Citizen complaints and letters of appeal led the County Commission yesterday to invite the local assessor and the director of the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation to a future meeting and explain how assessments are made.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2005
Two horses who never met on the track are locked in a battle for Horse of the Year. Although finalists for the Eclipse Awards were announced yesterday, fans will have to wait until Jan. 24 to find out which horse - Ghostzapper or Smarty Jones - will win racing's most prestigious prize. That's when the black-tie dinner and Eclipse Award presentations will take place in Beverly Hills, Calif. The winners will emerge from the three finalists in 15 equine and human categories. No finalists were announced for Horse of the Year, but it's a foregone conclusion that Smarty Jones, shoo-in as champion 3-year-old, and Ghostzapper, shoo-in as champion older horse, are the only contenders.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 22, 1992
Just before 5 on the afternoon of July 28, MTV announced that Morrissey would be signing copies of his new album, "Your Arsenal," at Vinyl Solution, a record store in Grand Rapids, Mich. Within minutes, a line started to form outside the store, despite the fact that the singer wasn't due in until midnight.By the time the signing began, more than 3,000 fans from all over the Midwest were massed outside the store, hoping to meet their idol. By 1:30 a.m., Morrissey was gone, and so was the store's stock of "Your Arsenal," all 557 copies of it. Even so, the fans didn't disperse until the automatic lawn sprinklers outside the store went on, at 2 a.m.Paul Pastalaniec, one of the store's owners, laughs that it was "a near-riot situation."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 7, 1994
Some say the world will end in fire and some say ice. I say it'll end in cuteness.I have it on good authority from a well-known local university's physics department that when the adorable Marisa Tomei and, say, the adorable Hugh Grant are cast in the same movie, there'll be some freak nuclear implosion of cuteness. A black hole will be ripped into the wall of the universe, and all of us, cute like you and un-cute like me, will be sucked into it.We almost get to that point with "Only You," which in fact has Tomei at the peak of her most cuddly adorability, but spares us global extinction on the basis of the slightly less-cute-than-Hugh-Grant American actor Robert Downey Jr. The movie, directed by Norman Jewison in an attempt to re-create the success of his "Moonstruck," follows as a young woman abandons her stable but somewhat boring life for a chance at true romantic happiness, a possibility offered her by . . . a Ouija board.
NEWS
August 11, 1992
Ouija tells allI noted your story regarding the U.S. Army intelligence officers who went AWOL to Florida expecting to greet Jesus after a Ouija board had told them he would return there on a flying saucer ("6 soldiers forfeit careers, determined to follow will of a Ouija board," July 27).I'm glad these officers are gone, and I surely hope the Army will not try too hard to return them to their posts. But why were they in "intelligence" to begin with?There should be an inquiry into what other decisions they madwith the help of their Ouija board.
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2008
Perhaps if Bob Murch had thought to ask his first Ouija board, it might have told him what was ahead: meandering trips through dank graveyards, hours of rooting through archives for patent files and court transcripts, landing in the middle - and helping resolve - a nearly 100-year feud between the families of the two Baltimore brothers who marketed the "all-knowing" slab of wood. But he didn't, and 15 years later, he's still immersed in his quest to document the history of "The Mystifying Oracle" - that diviner of the future, that gateway to the spirit world, that simple lettered board, born in Baltimore, that went on to become an icon of both pop culture and occult subculture.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2005
Two horses who never met on the track are locked in a battle for Horse of the Year. Although finalists for the Eclipse Awards were announced yesterday, fans will have to wait until Jan. 24 to find out which horse - Ghostzapper or Smarty Jones - will win racing's most prestigious prize. That's when the black-tie dinner and Eclipse Award presentations will take place in Beverly Hills, Calif. The winners will emerge from the three finalists in 15 equine and human categories. No finalists were announced for Horse of the Year, but it's a foregone conclusion that Smarty Jones, shoo-in as champion 3-year-old, and Ghostzapper, shoo-in as champion older horse, are the only contenders.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2004
GRAND PRAIRIE, Texas - Although promoters call it the world thoroughbred championships, the Breeders' Cup more closely resembles an all-star game. Its eight races showcase many of the world's best thoroughbreds. Distaff: America's top older female runners, Azeri and Sightseek, skipped the dance. Azeri's connections opted for the Classic, and Sightseek was recently retired. But the race decides the championship for 3-year-old fillies. The contenders are Ashado, winner of the Kentucky Oaks and Coaching Club American Oaks; Society Selection, winner of the Alabama Stakes, and Stellar Jayne, winner of the Mother Goose Stakes and Gazelle Handicap.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1997
DENTON -- "Caroline County came in first, unfortunately," sighed Margaret Myers, president of the three-member County Commission during yesterday's meeting.The "first" -- Caroline County's property assessments increased more than any other in the state last year -- has angered a lot of property owners and stirred up a small furor in this rural mid-Shore county, known for its rich soil and productive vegetable farms.Citizen complaints and letters of appeal led the County Commission yesterday to invite the local assessor and the director of the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation to a future meeting and explain how assessments are made.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK | February 5, 1995
Baltimore proudly touts its American firsts: first Roman Catholic cathedral (1821), first railroad (1827), first shot tower (1828), first dental college (1840), first Ouija board (1892), first rubber gloves used in surgery (1894), even the first permanent building topped with a revolving restaurant (Holiday Inn, 1964).There's another first that one hears much less about. Baltimore was the first U.S. city to pass a residential segregation ordinance (1911) that limited the places blacks could live.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 7, 1994
Some say the world will end in fire and some say ice. I say it'll end in cuteness.I have it on good authority from a well-known local university's physics department that when the adorable Marisa Tomei and, say, the adorable Hugh Grant are cast in the same movie, there'll be some freak nuclear implosion of cuteness. A black hole will be ripped into the wall of the universe, and all of us, cute like you and un-cute like me, will be sucked into it.We almost get to that point with "Only You," which in fact has Tomei at the peak of her most cuddly adorability, but spares us global extinction on the basis of the slightly less-cute-than-Hugh-Grant American actor Robert Downey Jr. The movie, directed by Norman Jewison in an attempt to re-create the success of his "Moonstruck," follows as a young woman abandons her stable but somewhat boring life for a chance at true romantic happiness, a possibility offered her by . . . a Ouija board.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2004
GRAND PRAIRIE, Texas - Although promoters call it the world thoroughbred championships, the Breeders' Cup more closely resembles an all-star game. Its eight races showcase many of the world's best thoroughbreds. Distaff: America's top older female runners, Azeri and Sightseek, skipped the dance. Azeri's connections opted for the Classic, and Sightseek was recently retired. But the race decides the championship for 3-year-old fillies. The contenders are Ashado, winner of the Kentucky Oaks and Coaching Club American Oaks; Society Selection, winner of the Alabama Stakes, and Stellar Jayne, winner of the Mother Goose Stakes and Gazelle Handicap.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 26, 1993
SUNNYVALE, Calif. -- Enter the Play-Doh aisle at your ow risk. Browse the children's books with caution. And don't even ask to go upstairs, where toys are stacked.The Toys "R" Us in Sunnyvale is haunted by a man named Johnson, employees and psychics say."I don't believe in ghosts," said Putt-Putt O'Brien, who has spent 18 years stacking toys at the store. "But you feel a breeze behind you. Someone calls your name and there's nobody there. Funny things happen here that you can't explain."Rag dolls and toy trucks leap off shelves.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 26, 1993
SUNNYVALE, Calif. -- Enter the Play-Doh aisle at your ow risk. Browse the children's books with caution. And don't even ask to go upstairs, where toys are stacked.The Toys "R" Us in Sunnyvale is haunted by a man named Johnson, employees and psychics say."I don't believe in ghosts," said Putt-Putt O'Brien, who has spent 18 years stacking toys at the store. "But you feel a breeze behind you. Someone calls your name and there's nobody there. Funny things happen here that you can't explain."Rag dolls and toy trucks leap off shelves.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 26, 1993
No more than 15 seconds into the teleconference, everyone knew ESPN hadn't gone the easy route and picked Dennis Miller off a rack marked comedians to host its Excellence in Sports Performance Awards show next Thursday (9-11:30 p.m.).A very funny guy, yes, but the former "Saturday Night Live" mainstay and former late-night talk show host turns out to be a huge sports fan, too. Two for the price of one.For instance, out of the blue he blurted out the starting lineup of the Houston team with Elvin Hayes that opposed the UCLA team with Lew Alcindor in the famed Astrodome TV game in the late '60s.
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