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By YOLANDA GARFIELD | May 12, 1991
"WE'RE DOING THEM BECAUSE no one else is," ottoman designer Tim Marks says. "We can be as fanciful as we want to be, with no boundaries. You can do so much with just a box, you can fluff it up or make it stark. The same shape in two different places can look radically different."The Ottoman Empire is a custom design and manufacturing company and design collective headed by husband and wife Tim Marks and Gail Blackburn. "Our No. 1 criterion for what we do is quality," says Mr. Marks, who with Ms. Blackburn conjures each design in the home where the finished piece will eventually reside.
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NEWS
June 21, 2014
The situation in Iraq is most analogous to that of Yugoslavia. Both countries were cobbled out of fallen empires after World War I, Iraq from the Ottoman Empire and Yugoslavia from the Austria-Hungarian Empire. Long standing ethnic, cultural and religious hatreds were ignored in creating these countries. Both countries were relatively stable for decades because of a strongman dictator - Marshal Josip Broz Tito in the case of Yugoslavia and Saddam Hussein in Iraq. Both countries lapsed into chaos once those leaders were no longer in power.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 25, 2008
Sally (last name and hometown withheld for obvious reasons) writes: "My family will be on the Nile in Egypt Feb. 14-28, 2009. Any chance we may experience a full moon?" A full moon over the Pyramids? Alas, you'll miss the full moon on the 9th. But a very slender crescent moon will appear after sunset on the 27th, low in the west, alongside the bright planet Venus, evoking a symbol of the old Ottoman Empire.
NEWS
September 26, 2009
OSMAN ERTUGRUL OSMANOGLU, 97 Ottoman dynasty member Osman Ertugrul Osmanoglu, the eldest member of the former Ottoman dynasty, has died, officials said Thursday. He was 97. Osmanoglu died of kidney failure at an Istanbul hospital on Wednesday, the Turkish Culture Ministry said. He was the last surviving grandson of an Ottoman sultan and regarded as the head of the living members of the dynasty. Osmanoglu would eventually have become its sultan but for the establishment of the Turkish Republic in 1923 following the collapse of the Ottoman dynasty and the exile of its members to Europe.
NEWS
September 26, 2009
OSMAN ERTUGRUL OSMANOGLU, 97 Ottoman dynasty member Osman Ertugrul Osmanoglu, the eldest member of the former Ottoman dynasty, has died, officials said Thursday. He was 97. Osmanoglu died of kidney failure at an Istanbul hospital on Wednesday, the Turkish Culture Ministry said. He was the last surviving grandson of an Ottoman sultan and regarded as the head of the living members of the dynasty. Osmanoglu would eventually have become its sultan but for the establishment of the Turkish Republic in 1923 following the collapse of the Ottoman dynasty and the exile of its members to Europe.
NEWS
June 21, 2014
The situation in Iraq is most analogous to that of Yugoslavia. Both countries were cobbled out of fallen empires after World War I, Iraq from the Ottoman Empire and Yugoslavia from the Austria-Hungarian Empire. Long standing ethnic, cultural and religious hatreds were ignored in creating these countries. Both countries were relatively stable for decades because of a strongman dictator - Marshal Josip Broz Tito in the case of Yugoslavia and Saddam Hussein in Iraq. Both countries lapsed into chaos once those leaders were no longer in power.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | October 17, 2007
With all the problems facing this country, both in Iraq and at home, why is Congress spending time trying to pass a resolution condemning the massacre of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire nearly a century ago? Make no mistake about it, that massacre of hundreds of thousands - perhaps a million or more - Armenians was one of the worst atrocities in all of history. As with the later Holocaust against the Jews, it was not considered sufficient to kill innocent victims. They were first put through soul-scarring dehumanization in whatever sadistic ways occurred to those who carried out these atrocities.
NEWS
By Bill Tammeus | April 1, 1992
ERRORS have been creeping into the school history textbooks American children use.The people who run schools, in response, have been demanding that textbook publishers correct their mistakes.This is a terrible situation, requiring eternal vigilance as the price of accuracy, and I am prepared to help. After all, I have devoted my journalistic career to the pursuit of accuracy -- or at least to not making up more facts than I have to.To help you evaluate the veracity of what you find in textbooks, I have drawn up an incomplete but instructive list of information to be suspicious of if you run across it in a book.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | September 19, 2007
If nothing else comes out of the Iraq war, it should banish the concept of "nation-building" from our language and our minds. "The track record of nation-building and Wilsonian grandiosity ought to give anyone pause," as was said in this column before the Iraq war began. We can now add Iraq to the list of disasters. The very existence of Iraq is a result of Woodrow Wilson's grandiose ideas about "the right of self-determination of peoples," which led to the dismemberment of the Ottoman Empire by the allied powers after World War I. Some of the most bitter and intractable conflicts of our time have arisen in nations carved out of the Ottoman Empire, whether in the Balkans or the Middle East.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2001
Awash in blue and white, Baltimore's Greektown played host yesterday to thousands celebrating the 180th anniversary of Greece's independence with a parade along Eastern Avenue that drew costumed marchers from across the region. Begun as a small neighborhood event six years ago, the Baltimore parade commemorating the 1821 liberation of Greece from the Ottoman Empire now is considered the second-largest Greek Independence Day celebration on the East Coast, second only to New York's. Members of Greek Orthodox churches and Greek schools and social organizations from Maryland, Virginia, Washington and Pennsylvania marched yesterday, each bringing a distinct cultural influence to a celebration akin to the one held on the Fourth of July.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 25, 2008
Sally (last name and hometown withheld for obvious reasons) writes: "My family will be on the Nile in Egypt Feb. 14-28, 2009. Any chance we may experience a full moon?" A full moon over the Pyramids? Alas, you'll miss the full moon on the 9th. But a very slender crescent moon will appear after sunset on the 27th, low in the west, alongside the bright planet Venus, evoking a symbol of the old Ottoman Empire.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | October 17, 2007
With all the problems facing this country, both in Iraq and at home, why is Congress spending time trying to pass a resolution condemning the massacre of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire nearly a century ago? Make no mistake about it, that massacre of hundreds of thousands - perhaps a million or more - Armenians was one of the worst atrocities in all of history. As with the later Holocaust against the Jews, it was not considered sufficient to kill innocent victims. They were first put through soul-scarring dehumanization in whatever sadistic ways occurred to those who carried out these atrocities.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | September 19, 2007
If nothing else comes out of the Iraq war, it should banish the concept of "nation-building" from our language and our minds. "The track record of nation-building and Wilsonian grandiosity ought to give anyone pause," as was said in this column before the Iraq war began. We can now add Iraq to the list of disasters. The very existence of Iraq is a result of Woodrow Wilson's grandiose ideas about "the right of self-determination of peoples," which led to the dismemberment of the Ottoman Empire by the allied powers after World War I. Some of the most bitter and intractable conflicts of our time have arisen in nations carved out of the Ottoman Empire, whether in the Balkans or the Middle East.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 17, 2004
WASHINGTON - After vowing to move Iraq toward democracy, the United States finds itself bogged down in an ethnic power struggle like those that persuaded some Middle Eastern leaders that only an iron-fisted dictator could hold the fractious nation together. Iraq's most prominent Shiite cleric is balking at a U.S.-backed plan for an interim government, fearing that it would deprive the long-oppressed Shiite majority of a share of power consistent with its numbers. But caving in to his demands could further inflame Iraq's Sunni minority, which has controlled the levers of power in Iraq from the days of the Ottoman Empire through Saddam Hussein's rule.
NEWS
October 25, 2003
WATCH OUT for historical analogies, because history has a way of never exactly coming to a conclusion. President Bush took a flier on one last week; he compared American intentions in Iraq to the long American experience in the Philippines, which began 105 years ago with victory in the Spanish-American War. It was a provocative thought, because up to now only critics of the Iraq war were making this comparison. The long-ago conflict with Spain, they point out, was launched on a dubious pretext, gave rise to chest-thumping patriotism, and was widely seen as an imperial adventure - by its many critics, but also by its supporters.
NEWS
By Jonathan Turley | September 18, 2001
WASHINGTON -- There is something about the word "war" that is almost irresistible in confronting the incomprehensible. Within hours of the explosions in Washington and New York, calls for a declaration of war came from politicians, commentators and citizens across the country. War represents a total commitment and in recent decades has become a popular way for expressing our common cause against modern scourges. Starting with Lyndon Johnson's "War on Poverty," we have declared wars on everything from inflation to illiteracy to drugs.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 27, 1991
GOVERNMENTSince the sheikdom of Kuwait was founded in 1756, it has been ruled, sometimes under British guardianship, by the Sabah family, who were chosen by its first Arab settlers. At the time of the invasion by Iraq on Aug. 2, the emir of Kuwait was Sheik Jaber al-Ahmad al-Sabah, who was head of state, leading a Cabinet with 10 appointed ministers and four elected ones. The constitution, framed in 1962, allowed the vote to literate, native-born Kuwaiti males over 21 years of age whose families had resided in Kuwait since 1920.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2001
Awash in blue and white, Baltimore's Greektown played host yesterday to thousands celebrating the 180th anniversary of Greece's independence with a parade along Eastern Avenue that drew costumed marchers from across the region. Begun as a small neighborhood event six years ago, the Baltimore parade commemorating the 1821 liberation of Greece from the Ottoman Empire now is considered the second-largest Greek Independence Day celebration on the East Coast, second only to New York's. Members of Greek Orthodox churches and Greek schools and social organizations from Maryland, Virginia, Washington and Pennsylvania marched yesterday, each bringing a distinct cultural influence to a celebration akin to the one held on the Fourth of July.
NEWS
By Gwinn Owens and Gwinn Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 2000
ATHENS, Greece - They convened in Greece last week from more than a dozen countries to search for a way to "right a historic wrong" or, in a contrary view, "to open a Pandora's box of cultural nationalism." The occasion was the first international conference on "The Restitution of the Parthenon Marbles." The participants represented more than a dozen countries - all those of Western Europe, the United States, Australia, Canada, Israel, India, Japan and, of course, Greece. The bare facts of the issue are these: In 1801, Thomas Bruce, seventh earl of Elgin, became ambassador to the Ottoman Empire (which then controlled Greece)
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