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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 10, 1999
CANTON, Ohio -- It was a night for football, and a night for pageantry.It was a night for tackles and passes and runs, and a night for emotions.It was a night for the future, but more important for the Cleveland Browns and their fans, it was a night for the past.After a three-season hiatus, the orange helmets and white uniforms returned to the field in Canton, the city where professional football was born.The Browns' opponent in last night's Hall of Fame Game at Fawcett Stadium was the Dallas Cowboys, but the opponent meant little.
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By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN COLUMNIST | September 12, 2002
When former Baltimore Colts great and Hall of Fame quarterback John Unitas died yesterday of an apparent heart attack, so did an era in Baltimore when a professional athlete embodied the spirit and passion of a city. Unitas was so Baltimore, and Baltimore was so Unitas. When he was the leader of one of the NFL's most storied franchises here from 1956 though 1972, every kid who played quarterback in this town - in sandlot, high school or college - was named Unitas. The receivers changed, but never the quarterback.
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SPORTS
November 10, 1995
1946-19521946: The Rams left for Los Angeles, and Arthur "Mickey" McBride brought a team to Cleveland as part of the eight-team AAFC. They were an instant success on the field with former Ohio State coach Paul Brown leading quarterback Otto Graham (a single-wing tailback at Northwestern) and running back Marion Motley to a 12-2 record. Kicker Lou Groza led the league in scoring. Motley and his lead blocker, Bill Willis, were the first black professional football players since 1933. On Dec. 22, Cleveland defeated the New York Yankees, 14-9, for the first AAFC championship.
SPORTS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 10, 1999
CANTON, Ohio -- It was a night for football, and a night for pageantry.It was a night for tackles and passes and runs, and a night for emotions.It was a night for the future, but more important for the Cleveland Browns and their fans, it was a night for the past.After a three-season hiatus, the orange helmets and white uniforms returned to the field in Canton, the city where professional football was born.The Browns' opponent in last night's Hall of Fame Game at Fawcett Stadium was the Dallas Cowboys, but the opponent meant little.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | January 20, 1995
NEW YORK -- From that automobile showroom -- selling the best in Hupmobiles -- in downtown Canton, Ohio, and also where franchise in the then-newly formed National Football League cost $100, to the Marquis Hotel and a $1,000-a-plate dinner, dramatically demonstrates what evolved in the 75-year history of a sport that has attained the ultimate in affluence and influence.It was in an auto dealership where the NFL held its charter gathering because it didn't have any other place to meet. Be it ever so humble.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | April 16, 1991
Stan Gelbaugh was selling office equipment in Rockville when he received a call from former Buffalo Bills teammate Jim Haslett. What could be more innocent? Nothing, until the World League of American Football came along.Gelbaugh, 28, wanted to change careers, not continents. But now the former Maryland quarterback finds himself playing for the London Monarchs, when the original plan was for Haslett's Sacramento Surge to select him in the supplemental draft.The moral: Trust a telephone solicitor, and you wind up halfway around the world.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN COLUMNIST | September 12, 2002
When former Baltimore Colts great and Hall of Fame quarterback John Unitas died yesterday of an apparent heart attack, so did an era in Baltimore when a professional athlete embodied the spirit and passion of a city. Unitas was so Baltimore, and Baltimore was so Unitas. When he was the leader of one of the NFL's most storied franchises here from 1956 though 1972, every kid who played quarterback in this town - in sandlot, high school or college - was named Unitas. The receivers changed, but never the quarterback.
SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | January 31, 1995
Minutes before the Super Bowl kickoff, San Diego coach Bobby Ross was airing a pet gripe on the national radio network.What bothered him was that the nation's media -- "particularly the print media" -- had not treated his team with the proper respect all year."
SPORTS
January 18, 1995
BaseballAtlanta Braves -- Revised ticket policies to offer full refunds and rebates of up to 50 percent for 1995 games played without a collective-bargaining agreement. Fans will have two homestands to decide whether they want to keep their tickets for the rest of the season. The club also will issue a rebate of up to 50 percent on each full-price season ticket or individual game ticket for any strike-affected games that are played.Colorado Rockies -- Named Keli McGregor VP of operations.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1997
Paul "The Bear" Hoffman, who humorously contends he was "kidnapped" by Purdue officials as a 17-year-old basketball prospect, will be honored today by his alma mater in West Lafayette, Ind., as one of the Boilermakers' top 12 players over the past century.It is the latest honor bestowed upon Hoffman, 72, best remembered in Baltimore as a member of the original Baltimore Bullets' 1947-48 NBA championship team. A burly, 6-foot-2, 205-pound guard, known for his aggressive style, Hoffman was Rookie of the Year that season.
SPORTS
November 10, 1995
1946-19521946: The Rams left for Los Angeles, and Arthur "Mickey" McBride brought a team to Cleveland as part of the eight-team AAFC. They were an instant success on the field with former Ohio State coach Paul Brown leading quarterback Otto Graham (a single-wing tailback at Northwestern) and running back Marion Motley to a 12-2 record. Kicker Lou Groza led the league in scoring. Motley and his lead blocker, Bill Willis, were the first black professional football players since 1933. On Dec. 22, Cleveland defeated the New York Yankees, 14-9, for the first AAFC championship.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | January 20, 1995
NEW YORK -- From that automobile showroom -- selling the best in Hupmobiles -- in downtown Canton, Ohio, and also where franchise in the then-newly formed National Football League cost $100, to the Marquis Hotel and a $1,000-a-plate dinner, dramatically demonstrates what evolved in the 75-year history of a sport that has attained the ultimate in affluence and influence.It was in an auto dealership where the NFL held its charter gathering because it didn't have any other place to meet. Be it ever so humble.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | April 16, 1991
Stan Gelbaugh was selling office equipment in Rockville when he received a call from former Buffalo Bills teammate Jim Haslett. What could be more innocent? Nothing, until the World League of American Football came along.Gelbaugh, 28, wanted to change careers, not continents. But now the former Maryland quarterback finds himself playing for the London Monarchs, when the original plan was for Haslett's Sacramento Surge to select him in the supplemental draft.The moral: Trust a telephone solicitor, and you wind up halfway around the world.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue said yesterday that he has not decided whether to recommend team owners approve or reject the proposed move of the Cleveland Browns to Baltimore, but he said both cities have to have teams.Interviewed on NBC during the halftime of the Rams-Bills game, Tagliabue said the demonstrated loyalty of both cities' fans dictated that the league must base franchises there."I think our challenge as a league is to keep a team in Cleveland and get a team to Baltimore. Let's face it, these are two storied groups of fans, two storied franchises.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | January 14, 1993
First off, let's put a proper slant on Sunday's conference championship games being played in San Francisco and Miami: They're just two more football games, that's all.You want proof of it, quickly and without diving for a reference book, name the NFC and AFC matchups that led to last year's Super Bowl. Chances are you'll have an easier time remembering what you ate at wherever it was you watched the Super Bowl.But, with the quarterback of the '70s (Terry Bradshaw) back in the studio trying to make himself understood, and the quarterback of the '80s (Joe Montana)
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