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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
Mmmmm. Snack fish. An Asian short-clawed otter is smacking his otter lips over a fish treat in its enclosure at the Chester Zoo   in Chester, England. The smallest of the world's otter species, the vulnerable short-clawed otters are part of a breeding program at the zoo.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Wayne and Wende Allen found a second home, their vacation escape, in a convenient location - 24 miles from their Harford County home. "Most of our friends who have second homes have them at the beach, in the mountains down south," said Wende Allen, a 46-year-old physician's assistant at a fertility clinic in Bel Air. "That's where you typically think your vacation home should be, hours away. But we have found our paradise retreat in our same county, our same comfortable community; yet it feels like we've escaped.
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NEWS
March 26, 2008
NORMA RAE OTTER, age 77, of Elkton, Md, died Monday, March 24, 2008. Born on September 16, 1930, in Washington D.C., she was the daughter of the late Charles and Lena Stewart Carter. Mrs. Otter had been a sales representative for Avon. She loved her cats and baking. Survivors include her companion of 36 years, Jim Lloyd; children Bonnie Runner of Bellefonte, Pa., Edward Otter and his wife Ellen of Salisbury, Md., Larry Otter and his wife Kim of Newark, De and Cheryl DeStefano of Elkton, Md. There are two brothers, Charles Carter and wife Jean of Towson, Md., Gordon Carter and Sharon, his wife, from the Chicago area, and a sister Jane Moyer and her husband Paul of Gilbertsville, Pa. There are eight grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
One of the finest waterfront properties on Gibson Island in Anne Arundel County is the contemporary three-story stucco home at 1621 St. Giles Road. "[The house] is just stunning, with sweeping views across Otter Pond and all the way to the Chesapeake Bay, the bridge and the Baltimore lighthouse," said Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage agent Ellie Shorb, who has listed the property for $1.97 million. "You can see the water from every living space and bedroom. " These bright living spaces are part of the home's open floor plan.
FEATURES
By Nancy White Carlstrom | July 7, 1999
Editor's note: When none of the other animals will play with him, Joshie the sea otter swims too far out to sea, until he's called back by his mother's singing.Joshua Otter wanted to play. "Oh no, not today," said his mama.She called, "Stop right now."But he swam far away to the great rocks of the seal baby pups.But those pups were asleep and they didn't hear him and they wouldn't wake up.So he swam to the brown walrus calves on the sand.And he asked them politely please once, then please twice.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | May 17, 1991
To Gregg Olsonc/o Baltimore OriolesLast Place, AL EastDear Otter:You still on this team?Seems like we never see you anymore. An inning here, an inning there, and then you disappear. It's like manager Frank Robinson said, "He's been sitting out there so much, I thought he had replaced the bullpen coach."No offense, No. 30: This isn't your fault. The only way you can earn a save is if the Orioles enter the late innings with a lead. Just a hunch, but it could happen again before the end of the millennium.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | July 22, 1993
The bat should go to the Hall of Fame. Rex Barney's introduction should be preserved on CD. Poems should be written to celebrate this historic moment, the day the Mighty Otter struck out.Now batting, No. 30, Gregg Olson.The 46,000 fans at Camden Yards roared in delight, embracing Olson in a way they rarely do when Barney presents him by saying, "Now pitching for the Orioles . . ."Maybe Olson should try this more often.He finally blows a save, then suffers an 8-6 loss, and all anyone wants to talk about is his hitting.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1998
For 72 years, Melvin Otter, an old man with a limp, faithfully visited the graves of five members of The Evening Sun Newsboys' Band in Baltimore's Loudon Park Cemetery. The five died July 4, 1924, when the Three Rivers, an excursion boat bringing them home from a concert in Crisfield, caught fire off Cove Point Light, 60 miles down the Chesapeake Bay. Ten passengers and crew members were found dead on the vessel -- among them band members Vernon E. Jefferson, 15; Nelson A. Miles, 17; Walter Clark Millikin, 13; Thomas A. Pilker Jr., 13; and Lester Alfred Seligman, 15.Otter, a retired News American proof reader who died of a heart attack earlier this month at age 89, was believed to be the last surviving band member who was aboard the Three Rivers that tragic night.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
Wielding pencils, markers and colored chalk, artist Beth Otter brings courtroom drama to Baltimore-area television screens.Her portfolio includes sketches of former Baltimore Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean, who left office under the cloud of fraud, and convicted murderers James Allan Kulbicki and John F. Thanos. This week, she added James Thomas Wood, accused of killing a Baltimore County minister on Christmas Eve 1994.Ms. Otter, 39, is one of Maryland's few courtroom sketch artists. It's art on the run, trying to capture a likeness for the evening news, blocking out horrifying testimony, and sketching quickly -- like on a five-floor elevator ride.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1998
Because Maryland bars cameras from courtrooms, much of what the public sees of newsworthy trials is framed by the quick hand and judicious eye of artist Beth Otter.At its debut last week, a City Hall exhibit of Maryland courtroom drawings, "Otter in the Court," attracted many legal world regulars, judges and lawyers who enjoyed seeing themselves captured in action."It's just fun to identify the people you know without looking at the captions," said Baltimore County Circuit Judge Dana M. Levitz at a preview June 11. He said the sketch of city Circuit Judge Evelyn O. Cannon presiding was especially striking: "That's just her!"
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
Mmmmm. Snack fish. An Asian short-clawed otter is smacking his otter lips over a fish treat in its enclosure at the Chester Zoo   in Chester, England. The smallest of the world's otter species, the vulnerable short-clawed otters are part of a breeding program at the zoo.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
It's difficult to imagine an animal less likely to draw admiring crowds at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore . A homely giant salamander that hides under rocks, slimes its enemies when threatened, and goes by such aliases as snot otter, devil dog and Allegheny alligator, the hellbender is nevertheless seen as an important and valuable addition to the zoo's collection. Two of the increasingly scarce animals inhabit Hellbender Country, a $200,000 exhibit that is set to open Thursday as part of the Maryland Wilderness area.
NEWS
March 26, 2008
NORMA RAE OTTER, age 77, of Elkton, Md, died Monday, March 24, 2008. Born on September 16, 1930, in Washington D.C., she was the daughter of the late Charles and Lena Stewart Carter. Mrs. Otter had been a sales representative for Avon. She loved her cats and baking. Survivors include her companion of 36 years, Jim Lloyd; children Bonnie Runner of Bellefonte, Pa., Edward Otter and his wife Ellen of Salisbury, Md., Larry Otter and his wife Kim of Newark, De and Cheryl DeStefano of Elkton, Md. There are two brothers, Charles Carter and wife Jean of Towson, Md., Gordon Carter and Sharon, his wife, from the Chicago area, and a sister Jane Moyer and her husband Paul of Gilbertsville, Pa. There are eight grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2005
Two years ago, when storm surge from Tropical Storm Isabel sent the waters here rising, the boats docked in Otter Point Creek floated up along with them. The Otter Point Yacht Club, however, did not. Nearly eight feet of water rushed inside the tiny clubhouse after a part of the front wall gave in. The drenched interior was destroyed - an overturned jukebox, chairs bobbing in the murky waters, boxes of food submerged. But true to its motto as a "working man's yacht club," a point of pride among members, the club rallied, rebuilding the nearly 60-year-old watering hole by themselves into a sleek new retreat with a stunning view.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
It's only a short drive from Baltimore, but when you pay a visit to the nearby banks of Otter Point Creek, the city's streets -- and maybe even civilization -- will feel as if they're miles away. Take to the fresh water in a canoe, and you'll be at one with the seemingly untouched area, where beaver, bald eagles, osprey and great blue herons live. "There's this really neat oasis within the developed world we live in," said Heather Helm, who manages Harford County's Leight Park, which surrounds and protects the waterway.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2003
It's midday at what's left of the foot of Otter Point Road in southern Harford County and the members of Otter Point Yacht Club are taking a load off after a hectic morning of rescuing the 58 boats docked there. The street is blocked with picnic tables and beer is iced down in a large metal cooler by the street entrance. Water laps about 6 feet above normal, still making waves at the bottom of the tiny street. It wasn't exactly a party atmosphere, except for the young girl in a tiara and sash.
NEWS
By John Dedinas and John Dedinas,Contributing Writer | September 10, 1995
The way from Route 24 to U.S. 40 is about to change. And the way from U.S. 40 to Route 24 is changing, too.A new ramp for motorists traveling from one highway to the other will open later this month.No longer will motorists on Route 24 be required to drive to Edgewood Road to hook up with U.S. 40.Instead, they'll drive down a four-lane ramp connecting U.S. 40 and Route 24 near where Route 24 crosses Otter Creek.Motorists turning off Route 24 and onto the ramp -- there will be a new traffic signal erected -- will be able to go west to Joppatowne or east to Aberdeen.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | August 23, 1993
You may not have thought so a couple of weeks ago, when the self-promotional artist Wyland stopped here on his East Coast tour, but there is other outdoor art in Baltimore besides the kitsch called a Whaling Wall that he left behind on the Lee Electric Co. building at Hamburg and Russell streets.There are more than 250 outdoor sculptures, for instance, from the statue of Washington atop his monument in Mount Vernon Place to Alexander Calder's brilliant red "100 Yard Dash" in the Baltimore Museum of Art's Levi Sculpture Garden.
NEWS
By Karen Rivers and Karen Rivers,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2003
About a month ago, 22 volunteers gathered at the Anita C. Leight Estuary Center and in two hours mastered the art of identifying frog calls. They weren't just amphibian lovers, but were there to learn more about the Chesapeake Bay and to help protect it. In coming months, the estuary center will offer further chances for the community to get involved with conservation at a grass-roots level, as it continues to hold workshops for those willing to get...
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