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By Chris Kaltenbach and J. Wynn Rousuck and Chris Kaltenbach and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
Ossie Davis, an actor, writer and social activist of unwavering dignity who compared his life to "riding eight horses at once," died yesterday in Miami Beach. He was 87. Davis, whose 56-year marriage to actress Ruby Dee constituted one of the most prolific and most honored partnerships of the American stage and screen, was in Florida shooting a film, titled Retirement. He was found dead, apparently of natural causes, in his hotel room early yesterday morning, said Miami Beach police spokesman Bobby Hernandez.
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NEWS
By chris kaltenbach and chris kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 6, 2008
Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch (2 p.m., AMC), the story of a band of outlaws looking to make one last grand stand, brought to the screen a Western like no one had seen before. Violent and dirty, with heroes whose distinctions between good and evil seem based on a sliding scale, it brought renewed energy to a genre that had been pretty much tapped out by the time of its 1969 release. If John Ford's Westerns were all about heroes and mythology and the steady pace of civilization, Peckinpah's centered on what happens when ruthless men find themselves in ruthless times.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 13, 2005
With the passing of a multitalented artist and public figure like Ossie Davis, it's tempting to recall his most solemn accomplishments as an orator, an activist, a spokesman for the power of film and theater, a friend to Martin Luther King Jr. and eulogist of Malcolm X. But Davis was a virile and complex creative force who did sublime, engaging work as a popular entertainer. Whether acting in a Western called The Scalphunters (1968) or directing that milestone in soul cinema, Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 23, 2005
It's too kind to say that Proud tells the story of the only black sailors to take a warship - the USS Mason - into combat during World War II. Storytelling is not the strong suit of the writer-director, Mary Pat Kelly. She must be commended for bringing the facts of this amazing tale to light. But the most I can say about Proud is that it made me want to see the documentary she also created on the subject, Proudly We Served: The Men of the USS Mason, and to read the book of the same title that she put together with the surviving crew members.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 24, 2003
Some movies score extra points for their plots alone. Bubba Ho-tep is one of them. Here goes: In an East Texas nursing home, Elvis (an uncanny Bruce Campbell, in as textured a performance as he's ever given) and JFK (Ossie Davis) are living out their final days. Presley, it seems, seeking a little peace and quiet, switched places with an Elvis impersonator, and it was that guy who keeled over in a Graceland bathroom, while JFK survived Dallas, only to be ousted by a cabal led by LBJ (for good measure, they had him dyed black)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 23, 2005
It's too kind to say that Proud tells the story of the only black sailors to take a warship - the USS Mason - into combat during World War II. Storytelling is not the strong suit of the writer-director, Mary Pat Kelly. She must be commended for bringing the facts of this amazing tale to light. But the most I can say about Proud is that it made me want to see the documentary she also created on the subject, Proudly We Served: The Men of the USS Mason, and to read the book of the same title that she put together with the surviving crew members.
NEWS
By chris kaltenbach and chris kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 6, 2008
Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch (2 p.m., AMC), the story of a band of outlaws looking to make one last grand stand, brought to the screen a Western like no one had seen before. Violent and dirty, with heroes whose distinctions between good and evil seem based on a sliding scale, it brought renewed energy to a genre that had been pretty much tapped out by the time of its 1969 release. If John Ford's Westerns were all about heroes and mythology and the steady pace of civilization, Peckinpah's centered on what happens when ruthless men find themselves in ruthless times.
NEWS
By MARILYN MCCRAVEN THE DUTCHMAN. Maan Meyers. Doubleday Perfect Crime. ` 306 pages. $18.50. and MARILYN MCCRAVEN THE DUTCHMAN. Maan Meyers. Doubleday Perfect Crime. ` 306 pages. $18.50.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 1992
JUST LIKE MARTIN.Ossie Davis.Simon & Schuster.215 pages. $14.It's the week before the historic 1963 March on Washington. Young Isaac Stone -- a junior minister who plans to become another Martin Luther King Jr. -- finds his plans to go to the march stymied by his father, Ike, who, still shaky from his wife's death, fears for his son's safety. And, besides, he isn't too keen on the idea of marching for freedom and justice.Disagreement over the march isn't the only point of contention between them.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 25, 1997
Though it tries hard, "I'm Not Rappaport" can never really escape the reality that it's about two old guys sitting on a Central Park bench, talking.Originally a beloved stage play, where its artificiality was not a liability but a value, the film version feels static and slow-moving. Worse, the actors, particularly Walter Matthau, have been instructed to try to reach Row ZZ in the third balcony and to pay no attention to that camera thing there, two feet away. It was directed, perhaps too reverentially, by its playwright, Herb Gardner, most famous for the winsome "A Thousand Clowns."
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 19, 2000
According to production information, "Dinosaur" took five years to make, not to mention 3.2 million processing hours, 45 terabytes of disc space, 250 computer processors and 70,000 lines of code. According to rumor, it also cost $200 million to produce. The question before us is whether it was worth it. A lifeless, warmed-over story meant to overcome its limitations with eye-catching special effects, "Dinosaur" falls into a limbo that so many animated features seem to occupy these days, the nether world between a children's movie and a full-blown adult action adventure.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - To understand the world that produced Raiford Chatman Davis, it is perhaps enough to understand how he got his name changed. It happened when his mother went to register his birth certificate. She told the man at the counter that her son was known as R. C. Davis. The clerk misheard her, but she didn't correct him. He was white, she was black, and this was Georgia. So R. C. spent the rest of his life under the name that resulted from an uncorrected error: Ossie Davis. He died Feb. 4 in Miami, a courtly and elegant man of 87 years, justifiably lionized for his accomplishments as a writer and actor in a career that spanned six decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 13, 2005
With the passing of a multitalented artist and public figure like Ossie Davis, it's tempting to recall his most solemn accomplishments as an orator, an activist, a spokesman for the power of film and theater, a friend to Martin Luther King Jr. and eulogist of Malcolm X. But Davis was a virile and complex creative force who did sublime, engaging work as a popular entertainer. Whether acting in a Western called The Scalphunters (1968) or directing that milestone in soul cinema, Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970)
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and J. Wynn Rousuck and Chris Kaltenbach and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
Ossie Davis, an actor, writer and social activist of unwavering dignity who compared his life to "riding eight horses at once," died yesterday in Miami Beach. He was 87. Davis, whose 56-year marriage to actress Ruby Dee constituted one of the most prolific and most honored partnerships of the American stage and screen, was in Florida shooting a film, titled Retirement. He was found dead, apparently of natural causes, in his hotel room early yesterday morning, said Miami Beach police spokesman Bobby Hernandez.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 24, 2003
Some movies score extra points for their plots alone. Bubba Ho-tep is one of them. Here goes: In an East Texas nursing home, Elvis (an uncanny Bruce Campbell, in as textured a performance as he's ever given) and JFK (Ossie Davis) are living out their final days. Presley, it seems, seeking a little peace and quiet, switched places with an Elvis impersonator, and it was that guy who keeled over in a Graceland bathroom, while JFK survived Dallas, only to be ousted by a cabal led by LBJ (for good measure, they had him dyed black)
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 19, 2000
According to production information, "Dinosaur" took five years to make, not to mention 3.2 million processing hours, 45 terabytes of disc space, 250 computer processors and 70,000 lines of code. According to rumor, it also cost $200 million to produce. The question before us is whether it was worth it. A lifeless, warmed-over story meant to overcome its limitations with eye-catching special effects, "Dinosaur" falls into a limbo that so many animated features seem to occupy these days, the nether world between a children's movie and a full-blown adult action adventure.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 25, 1997
Though it tries hard, "I'm Not Rappaport" can never really escape the reality that it's about two old guys sitting on a Central Park bench, talking.Originally a beloved stage play, where its artificiality was not a liability but a value, the film version feels static and slow-moving. Worse, the actors, particularly Walter Matthau, have been instructed to try to reach Row ZZ in the third balcony and to pay no attention to that camera thing there, two feet away. It was directed, perhaps too reverentially, by its playwright, Herb Gardner, most famous for the winsome "A Thousand Clowns."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 21, 1990
"Evening Shade"is an uneven, up-and-down hour of television. But the ups are higher than just about any others the new season has to offer. And that makes the lows more than worth it.This is the show with the cast of casts (by the standards of weekly series television) you have been hearing so many good things about: Burt Reynolds, Ossie Davis, Hal Holbrook, Charles Durning, Elizabeth Ashley and Marilu Henner.Overall, their performances are so good that by the final sequence many viewers will even remember what it was about Burt Reynolds that once made him such a talented and appealing leading man -- before he started doing "Smoky" movie sequels and producing game shows.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - To understand the world that produced Raiford Chatman Davis, it is perhaps enough to understand how he got his name changed. It happened when his mother went to register his birth certificate. She told the man at the counter that her son was known as R. C. Davis. The clerk misheard her, but she didn't correct him. He was white, she was black, and this was Georgia. So R. C. spent the rest of his life under the name that resulted from an uncorrected error: Ossie Davis. He died Feb. 4 in Miami, a courtly and elegant man of 87 years, justifiably lionized for his accomplishments as a writer and actor in a career that spanned six decades.
NEWS
By MARILYN MCCRAVEN THE DUTCHMAN. Maan Meyers. Doubleday Perfect Crime. ` 306 pages. $18.50. and MARILYN MCCRAVEN THE DUTCHMAN. Maan Meyers. Doubleday Perfect Crime. ` 306 pages. $18.50.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 1992
JUST LIKE MARTIN.Ossie Davis.Simon & Schuster.215 pages. $14.It's the week before the historic 1963 March on Washington. Young Isaac Stone -- a junior minister who plans to become another Martin Luther King Jr. -- finds his plans to go to the march stymied by his father, Ike, who, still shaky from his wife's death, fears for his son's safety. And, besides, he isn't too keen on the idea of marching for freedom and justice.Disagreement over the march isn't the only point of contention between them.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 21, 1990
"Evening Shade"is an uneven, up-and-down hour of television. But the ups are higher than just about any others the new season has to offer. And that makes the lows more than worth it.This is the show with the cast of casts (by the standards of weekly series television) you have been hearing so many good things about: Burt Reynolds, Ossie Davis, Hal Holbrook, Charles Durning, Elizabeth Ashley and Marilu Henner.Overall, their performances are so good that by the final sequence many viewers will even remember what it was about Burt Reynolds that once made him such a talented and appealing leading man -- before he started doing "Smoky" movie sequels and producing game shows.
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