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Osprey

FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
The battle between birds and bureaucrats is over — and both sides won. With a helping hand from a state carpenter, an osprey couple finally got a home with a view of the water on the eastern end of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge. And the Maryland Transportation Authority, which manages the toll facility, finally got the pesky birds to stop nesting in front of cameras that keep an eye on traffic on busy U.S. 50 below. It's a happy ending to a story that has gone viral over the last several days, generating buzz on social media and even attracting the attention of CNN and Fox News.
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FEATURES
Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
Perched atop a weathered navigational marker near Rocky Point in Back River, the osprey shifted nervously, screeched and flew off as a boat full of people approached. With the raptor circling overhead, Rebecca Lazarus climbed onto the marker and peered into its nest, a tangled heap of tree branches and scraps of plastic. "She's got one chick in here," called out Lazarus, a doctoral student at the University of Maryland, College Park. The osprey had laid two eggs, but only one hatched.
NEWS
By Jeff Holland and Jeff Holland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 1999
IF ROBINS appear, can ospreys be far behind?I saw my first robins just the other day; close-up, confirmed sightings. They were frolicking along Second Street in Eastport, looking none the worse for their flight north.The ospreys usually begin to arrive around St. Patrick's Day, wending their way up the coast from Central and South America.You hear them first, that curious, high-pitched whistle, and then spot them soaring low over the treetops. The smaller males come first, staking claims on the same nesting sites year after year.
NEWS
By Jeff Holland and Jeff Holland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 1999
LIKE THE SWALLOWS returning to Capistrano, the ospreys came back to Annapolis right on schedule.We saw the first ones over the mouth of the Severn River on St. Patrick's Day, as usual, looking a bit slim from their flight up the coast from Central America. Then I saw three more over the South River near historic London Town.Another St. Patrick's Day tradition was delayed, however. Green Derby Day was postponed because of pending nasty weather, and has been rescheduled for April 18 in Eastport.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau Staff writer Michael James contributed to this article | July 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The latest crash of the experimental V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft -- which killed a Marine Corps test pilot from Baltimore and six other people -- "will significantly complicate" the future of the $30 billion project, the Pentagon declared yesterday."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1996
An immature bald eagle released at Patuxent River Naval Air Station to dramatize President Clinton's visit there Thursday got knocked out of the sky by four angry ospreys before the president had even finished his Independence Day speech extolling the comeback of "our national symbol."The Navy, Coast Guard and Secret Service knew about the attack on the eagle before the president had stepped off the speaker's platform, but officials kept the enthusiastic crowd of invited dignitaries, military personnel and environmentalists in the dark.
NEWS
By NEW YORK NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 1997
SHELTER ISLAND, N.Y. - Ruby-throated hummingbirds, red-wing blackbirds and great blue herons inhabit the salt marshes, freshwater ponds and pine swamps that make this storied island one of the last nature refuges of Long Island.But it is the osprey, a fish-eating hawk that builds skyscraper nests out of junk, that has captured the imagination of generations of East Enders. Residents around Peconic Bay baby the big birds, building platforms in yards for the ospreys to nest. Tourists come to see them take their dramatic dives into the water to snap up flounder with their claws.
NEWS
By Jeff Holland and Jeff Holland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 20, 1999
When I started writing this column, I mentioned that I was looking forward to the return of the ospreys. And now that they're on their way back south, it's a good time to stop writing. I'm passing on this space to another correspondent who I hope will have as much fun as I've had, babbling about birds and books and boats, history and the wonderful people doing wonderful things around Annapolis and South County.Here are some events I think you'll enjoy:Charles Carroll House of Annapolis will present the lecture, "Revolutionary Measures in Wartime," from 7: 30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
By Elisha King and Elisha King,Evening Sun Staff | June 19, 1991
Two ospreys can sleep safely tonight in the same home the built on an electric pole near Essex last spring, no longer in danger of electrocution.Workers from the Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. moved the birds' four-foot-long, oval nest yesterday from its original spot on top of a 7,600 volt wire to a platform four feet higher on the pole.The pole is located on the 2600 block of Holly Neck Road in eastern Baltimore County.The ospreys, members of an endangered species, were not in the nest when workers carefully removed the crossarm of the pole that their nest lay upon.
NEWS
By Alan C. Miller and Kevin Sack and Alan C. Miller and Kevin Sack,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2002
YUMA, Ariz. - In the entire U.S. arsenal, only the Marine Corps' Harrier attack jet can lift straight up off a runway, hover like a hummingbird, then blast off toward its target. Though many had died flying it, Lt. Col. Peter E. Yount never thought the plane would let him down. "Difficult but honest," he called it. But in 1998, the Harrier betrayed him - not once, but twice. High above the Southern California desert, the plane's engine quit and refused to restart. Then, when Yount ejected, his seat rotated out of position and his parachute harness smacked violently against his helmet.
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