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NEWS
April 6, 2008
An Animal Control officer rescued an injured osprey, with the assistance of a local boater, Anne Arundel County police said. Someone walking on the beach of Shore View Circle in Crownsville reported finding the bird about 2 p.m. Tuesday. As Officer Ken Roy, who was dispatched to the scene, approached the osprey to capture it, it flew about 100 yards and fell into the water. A resident with a boat was willing to take him out to where the bird was. Roy retrieved the bird from the water and transported it to Animal Control.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
The battle between birds and bureaucrats is over — and both sides won. With a helping hand from a state carpenter, an osprey couple finally got a home with a view of the water on the eastern end of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge. And the Maryland Transportation Authority, which manages the toll facility, finally got the pesky birds to stop nesting in front of cameras that keep an eye on traffic on busy U.S. 50 below. It's a happy ending to a story that has gone viral over the last several days, generating buzz on social media and even attracting the attention of CNN and Fox News.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
In the contest between bird and traffic camera, it's a question of which will blink first. A persistent osprey - likely in league with a mate - has been trying since late last week to build a nest smack dab in front of a traffic cam keeping watch on the eastbound U.S. 50 approach to the Bay Bridge. The Maryland Transportation Authority has removed the nest three times, only to have the determined bird or birds return. Late Tuesday afternoon, a branch - possibly the beginnings of another nest - could be seen in front of the camera, lying on the steel gantry over the highway.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
In the contest between bird and traffic camera, it's a question of which will blink first. A persistent osprey - likely in league with a mate - has been trying since late last week to build a nest smack dab in front of a traffic cam keeping watch on the eastbound U.S. 50 approach to the Bay Bridge. The Maryland Transportation Authority has removed the nest three times, only to have the determined bird or birds return. Late Tuesday afternoon, a branch - possibly the beginnings of another nest - could be seen in front of the camera, lying on the steel gantry over the highway.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | August 25, 1991
Warning! A rumor is circulating that the Coast Guard has given recreational boaters another month's grace to get their federal, recreational boat user-fee sticker.I had a Severna Park boater tell me today that he wouldn't need a sticker because he always puts his boat away in mid-September.I checked Thursday, and this rumor is only half-true. If stopped after Sept. 1 without the sticker and you can prove satisfactorily tothe Coast Guard that you have ordered the sticker, you will not be ticketed.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | November 8, 1992
At 9 o'clock on a raw gray November morning this past week, fifteen of Joan Johnson's better students, ninth and tenth graders from Northern High School in Baltimore, come straggling across the pavement by the National Aquarium toward the white workboat lying quietly at the bulkhead.The boat is the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Osprey, built i Rock Hall in 1979 especially for the foundation's education program, then just getting under way. She is skippered this day by Sharon (Sia) Moesel. Brendan Sweeney of the CBF education staff is aboard as mate.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 1, 2001
WASHINGTON - Congressional support for the Marine Corps' controversial V-22 Osprey is wavering after two fatal crashes last year and charges that the aircraft's maintenance records were falsified. Congress has kept the Osprey aloft for 20 years, but influential senators and members of the House of Representatives said the program should be re-evaluated before the Pentagon builds hundreds of the tilt-rotor aircraft, which flies like an airplane but takes off and lands like a helicopter.
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
An osprey nest on a railroad signal pole in Conowingo is worrying environmentalists. Bob Chance, trail manager for the Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway, said the proximity of the large nest to the tracks has prompted concern for the safety of the osprey, as well as the trains along the site. Chance said he was contacted two weeks ago about the nest's existence by Norfolk Southern Railroad officials in Conowingo who were concerned that it might be obstructing the view of the signal from the tracks that run over the Susquehanna River.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | June 5, 2005
WITH HEADS nearly the size of their bodies, the week-old osprey chicks just stare at me as I stand on tiptoe on the channel marker 8 feet above the Severn River. The anxious parents flap nearby, attempting to scare me off with their squawks and chirps. Not to worry; as an afraid-of-heights, can't-swim human, I am doing a good job of frightening myself. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees wait in their boat below ready to activate a search-and-rescue mission. While the chicks are impossibly cute, what is hanging a short distance from their heads is not. Old discarded plastic and fishing line are woven into the nest.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1995
The latest tenants are away, perhaps until next spring, so the historic brick house on the Chesapeake Bay is getting a face lift.The tenants are a family of ospreys, and the "house" is the Sandy Point Lighthouse, which for 112 years has warned mariners away from a treacherous shoal near the western end of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge."
NEWS
By Joel Dunn | July 16, 2013
A little osprey chick has been the center of attention for a growing crowd of admirers this summer. It's the third chick to hatch to a pair of osprey, Tom and Audrey, who make their home on a nesting platform at the end of a dock on Kent Island. It's an osprey home like many others, with one exception: It has a hi-def video camera attached. So Tom and Audrey's busy nest-hold is being beamed out to the world via http://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org , a real reality TV show. Thousands of folks check in daily to see whether Tom has brought home the fish, whether Audrey is tending the nest, and - maybe most of all - whether that little chick will survive to fly away.
FEATURES
Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
Perched atop a weathered navigational marker near Rocky Point in Back River, the osprey shifted nervously, screeched and flew off as a boat full of people approached. With the raptor circling overhead, Rebecca Lazarus climbed onto the marker and peered into its nest, a tangled heap of tree branches and scraps of plastic. "She's got one chick in here," called out Lazarus, a doctoral student at the University of Maryland, College Park. The osprey had laid two eggs, but only one hatched.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | April 24, 2012
Nature presents many truisms. Water doesn't flow uphill. Bears eat what they want, where they want. There's no such thing as a squirrel-proof bird feeder. If you need evidence of the latter, simply type the words "rube, Goldberg, squirrel" into your favorite Internet search engine and enjoy the videos of bright-eyed, bushy-tailed creatures making their way through the most mindless of obstacle courses to get to the nuts. While water doesn't flow uphill for reasons dictated by the laws of physics and we humans are inclined to impart human qualities such as persistence and ingenuity to squirrels and bears that defeat bird-feeders and garbage cans, the reason squirrels and bears win in the end is really more of a force of nature than any mental qualities they possess.
EXPLORE
August 23, 2011
Editor: Maryland is a great place to live!  With the Chesapeake Bay, mountains to the west, with seafood, fishing, hunting, boating, crabbing. Where I live in Aberdeen, we have our own worldwide tourist attraction, Ripken Stadium. The Cal Ripken World Series last week was a success. As a native Marylander and young boy I grew up, like many young boys, playing youth baseball. Sports teach children a valuable lesson in teamwork. Despite the bad weather, the Bel Air BBQ Bash was a huge success.
NEWS
April 6, 2008
An Animal Control officer rescued an injured osprey, with the assistance of a local boater, Anne Arundel County police said. Someone walking on the beach of Shore View Circle in Crownsville reported finding the bird about 2 p.m. Tuesday. As Officer Ken Roy, who was dispatched to the scene, approached the osprey to capture it, it flew about 100 yards and fell into the water. A resident with a boat was willing to take him out to where the bird was. Roy retrieved the bird from the water and transported it to Animal Control.
NEWS
November 30, 2007
Benefit concert -- The Annapolis Maritime Museum presents its first annual "Grand Ole Osprey" concert from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. tomorrow at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St., Annapolis. The show will feature live entertainment by Tom "Bard of the Bay" Wisner, Kevin Brooks (left) and Jeff Holland of Them Eastport Oyster Boys, the Annapolis Chorale, the Annapolis Youth Chorus, the George Fox Middle School Ukulele Ensemble and the Mt. Zion United Methodist Church Gospel Choir.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - In its final report on the crash of a V-22 Osprey last December, the Marine Corps said yesterday that malfunctioning software caused the aircraft to swerve wildly out of control before plummeting to the ground and bursting into flames, killing all four Marines on board. The report recommended a battery of new tests, improved inspection regimens and the redesign of the problem-plagued aircraft's hydraulic system before the $40 billion Osprey program would be allowed to proceed.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - Military investigators suspect a second Marine officer may be involved in the alleged filing of false maintenance records on the tilt-rotor Osprey aircraft, which suffered a pair of deadly crashes last year, Pentagon sources said. The officer is stationed at Marine headquarters in Washington and is senior to Lt. Col. O. Fred Leberman, who commanded the V-22 Osprey squadron at the Marine air station at New River, N.C., sources say. Leberman was relieved of command last month amid allegations that he ordered subordinates to falsify maintenance records to make the aircraft look as though it was performing better than it was. He has denied the allegations.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | November 26, 2007
I was in Columbia the other day, in one of those village centers that's near one of those hellish traffic circles they like out there, when I pulled into a Sunoco station. Two things struck me immediately. One was the price of a gallon of unleaded, which was higher there than in most places, probably because you burn a lot of gas driving around looking for the stupid village centers. But the other thing was this: On top of each pump was a TV. Don't ask me if it was a plasma or LCD or whatever, because I'm not up on that stuff and don't much care about it, either.
NEWS
By Marcia Cephus | July 8, 2007
Barbecue slated for Thursday The Anne Arundel Tech Council is accepting registration for the third annual Comcast BBQ on the Bay Tech Expo from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation in Annapolis. The cost is $50 for members; $65 for nonmembers; and $70 at the door. The cost includes barbecue, and beer and wine tastings. Information: http:--aatechcouncil.org or 410-222-7410, Ext. 124. Chamber to hold mixer July 17 The Southern Anne Arundel Chamber of Commerce will hold a business after-hours mixer from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. July 17 at Sandy Spring Bank, 116 Mitchells Chance Road, Edgewater.
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