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NEWS
April 15, 1997
YOUR APRIL 9 editorial, ''Netanyahu gives not an inch,'' in its interpretation of the facts, is clearly biased.As the democratically elected prime minister of Israel, Benjamin Netanyahu has sought to abide by the Oslo accords he inherited from his predecessor.Israel would grant limited autonomy to Palestinians, and the PLO would renounce violence and formally expunge from its charter articles that call for Israel's destruction.The parties expressly left other controversial issues -- such as the status of Jerusalem and the character of a Palestinian entity -- for later negotiation.
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NEWS
November 27, 2012
While reading G. Jefferson Price's column ("For Israel, it's different this time," Nov. 20), I was reminded of the quip "learned nothing, forgot nothing" describing a reactionary French royal family. Mr. Price displays the same distorted views toward Israel he showed 35 years ago when he was The Sun's Middle East correspondent, intervening events not budging his attitudes. According to Mr. Price, Israel "acts with impunity" against Palestinian Arabs and Lebanon. Unmentioned are thousands of Israeli casualties, two Arab uprisings, withdrawals from Gaza, Lebanon and major portions of the West Bank.
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NEWS
By Aron U. Raskas | June 7, 2001
THE MITCHELL report correctly rejected the Palestinian claim that Ariel Sharon's peaceful visit to the Jewish Temple Mount in September caused the violence now convulsing Israel and the Palestinian territories. Yet the commission headed by former Sen. George Mitchell gravely erred by gratuitously suggesting that Israel unilaterally cease settlement activity in the West Bank. That recommendation rests upon faulty moral, legal and diplomatic ground. Polished Palestinian propaganda machines have worked diligently to portray a scenario of Israeli settlements choking Palestinian communities the way Wal-Marts and Food Lions have come to roll back the cornfields and encroach upon suburban America.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | July 25, 2004
Here's a suggestion for the Palestinian parliament struggling in Ramallah to bring some order to the authority that supposedly runs the lives of its people in the West Bank and Gaza, and represents the aspirations of millions in the Palestinian diaspora. They should pass an emergency decree, not a resolution, but a real law, demanding that no one in parliament or in the executive can serve beyond age 75. Yasser Arafat will be 75 on Aug. 24. That would give him one month to dust off his fatigues, straighten out his head scarf, step into the sunlight and take a bow for all that he thinks he has done for the Palestinian people.
NEWS
By Aron U. Raskas | January 9, 2001
YASSER ARAFAT has acted with "ambivalent attitudes toward terrorism, and at times outright complicity." The Palestinian Authority's non-compliance with its commitments has "actually led to a repeated pattern of abuse, misconduct and outright violence on the part of the PA." Right-wing rhetoric? No. These and similar statements represent the official position of Israel's government set forth in a white paper, "Palestinian Authority and P.L.O. Non-Compliance with Signed Agreements: A Record of Bad Faith and Misconduct."
NEWS
November 27, 2012
While reading G. Jefferson Price's column ("For Israel, it's different this time," Nov. 20), I was reminded of the quip "learned nothing, forgot nothing" describing a reactionary French royal family. Mr. Price displays the same distorted views toward Israel he showed 35 years ago when he was The Sun's Middle East correspondent, intervening events not budging his attitudes. According to Mr. Price, Israel "acts with impunity" against Palestinian Arabs and Lebanon. Unmentioned are thousands of Israeli casualties, two Arab uprisings, withdrawals from Gaza, Lebanon and major portions of the West Bank.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 14, 1998
JERUSALEM -- Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu welcomed yesterday a call by the United States for direct talks between his government and the Palestinians to break a 16-month stalemate in the Middle East peace process.But in an interview, he repeated his contention that the Palestinians have not lived up to their commitments to combat terrorism, and that only if they do so will Israel agree to turn over more land.A major terrorist attack has not occurred in Israel in 10 months, but Netanyahu attributed the respite in large measure to his government's strong stance on the Oslo accords' land-for-peace policy.
NEWS
By Neve Gordon | April 2, 2002
JERUSALEM -- Although many people have begun to think otherwise, there is a solution to the Middle East crisis. What is the fundamental issue trapping Israelis and Palestinians within a horrific cycle of violence? The answer to this could also guide retired Gen. Anthony C. Zinni, the U.S. envoy to the Middle East, as he tries to bring calm to the region. History, as always, is a good teacher. For seven years after the September 1993 signing of the Oslo accords, there was relative quiet in the region.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | February 10, 1995
Jerusalem -- DRIVING UP from the Jordan Valley to this ancient and sacred city, the visitor gone for four years is staggered by the changes. Jerusalem used to be the only great city on the top of the hills. Today, the hilltops surrounding it are topped by a glorious new "crown" of Israeli cities made of the golden stone of these valleys. They are beautiful, and they look very permanent.And right there, you've got the problem.Typically, Palestinians queried about the continuation of the building of the Jewish settlements -- many of them clearly on Arab land -- become visibly upset.
NEWS
By Irwin J. Mansdorf | April 11, 2002
RA'ANANA, Israel - It's really simple psychology. Reward a behavior, and you'll see more of it. Don't reward it, and it'll eventually disappear. Reinforce the wrong behavior, and you create a mess. Nowhere are these simple rules more apparent or applicable than in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict of the last few decades. And in the application of psychology, the Palestinians, until now, have had the upper hand. View the Middle East as a psychological conflict, and the lines are fairly well drawn.
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Timmerman | August 22, 2003
THE LATEST buzzword among the chattering classes who track the minutiae of the Israeli-Palestinian dispute is hudna, a Quranic term coined by the Prophet Mohammed to designate a temporary cease-fire. Palestinian Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas is using the term to describe his feckless efforts to defang Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad, terrorist groups whose homicide bombers have killed hundreds of Israelis in coffee shops, discotheques, bars, buses and on street corners, including the one Tuesday night in Jerusalem that killed at least 20 people.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | September 22, 2002
JERUSALEM -- Two years after the fight between Palestinians and Israelis began hurtling to an unprecedented level of violence, the cost to both sides has been enormous and the hope of ever restoring a peace process seems to have disappeared. The death toll has reached the proportions of a full-scale war. More than 2,100 people have been killed since the uprising the Palestinians call the Al Aqsa Intifada began late September 2000. That includes more than 1,500 Palestinians and almost 600 Israelis.
NEWS
June 21, 2002
Flunk all pupils who cannot make the grade The Sun's article "City students promoted despite not meeting goals" (June 15) seemed to suggest that the schools' 87 percent attendance rate for ninth-graders was acceptable, while its 78 percent attendance rate among the ninth-graders in a transitional program was not. But 87 percent average attendance means that the typical child misses about 23 days of school per year. Acceptable? I think not. What employer would tolerate such abysmal attendance?
NEWS
By Irwin J. Mansdorf | April 11, 2002
RA'ANANA, Israel - It's really simple psychology. Reward a behavior, and you'll see more of it. Don't reward it, and it'll eventually disappear. Reinforce the wrong behavior, and you create a mess. Nowhere are these simple rules more apparent or applicable than in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict of the last few decades. And in the application of psychology, the Palestinians, until now, have had the upper hand. View the Middle East as a psychological conflict, and the lines are fairly well drawn.
NEWS
By Neve Gordon | April 2, 2002
JERUSALEM -- Although many people have begun to think otherwise, there is a solution to the Middle East crisis. What is the fundamental issue trapping Israelis and Palestinians within a horrific cycle of violence? The answer to this could also guide retired Gen. Anthony C. Zinni, the U.S. envoy to the Middle East, as he tries to bring calm to the region. History, as always, is a good teacher. For seven years after the September 1993 signing of the Oslo accords, there was relative quiet in the region.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 11, 2001
JERUSALEM - In the bloody year since the failed Camp David summit, many Israelis have come to suspect that their fight with the Palestinians is not over "ending the occupation" in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, but over the very existence of a Jewish state. For years, right-wing opponents of the Oslo accords contended that Yasser Arafat, contrary to his public statements, had no intention of peaceful coexistence with Israel. But since the collapse of peace negotiations last July and the eruption of the Palestinian uprising in late September, more moderate Israelis and some senior military officials have come to share a darker view of Palestinian goals.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | August 29, 1997
LONDON -- A short 2 1/2 years ago, then foreign minister of Israel Shimon Peres observed: "I don't think we have in the Middle East a process of peace. We have a war for peace, because it calls unfortunately for victims and casualties."Probably, not even in the most pessimistic moments of this melancholic man, did he foresee that soon after he spoke he'd witness the triple whammy of the murder of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, the subsequent victory at the polls of Likud's dTC party leader Binyamin Netanyahu and the effective pacing of negotiations under the Oslo accords by terrorist elements on both the Israeli and Palestinian sides.
NEWS
By Robert Satloff | April 21, 1998
WHAT DO Middle Easterners have to learn from the Northern Ireland peace accord? Other than the common legacy of terrorism and the shedding of innocent blood, the two conflicts are fundamentally different and the solutions reached at Stormont this month and in Oslo, Norway, in 1993 are very different, too.But the record of the peace process between Israelis and Palestinians does have an important lesson for Northern Ireland: The tough part is implementing an...
NEWS
By Aron U. Raskas | June 7, 2001
THE MITCHELL report correctly rejected the Palestinian claim that Ariel Sharon's peaceful visit to the Jewish Temple Mount in September caused the violence now convulsing Israel and the Palestinian territories. Yet the commission headed by former Sen. George Mitchell gravely erred by gratuitously suggesting that Israel unilaterally cease settlement activity in the West Bank. That recommendation rests upon faulty moral, legal and diplomatic ground. Polished Palestinian propaganda machines have worked diligently to portray a scenario of Israeli settlements choking Palestinian communities the way Wal-Marts and Food Lions have come to roll back the cornfields and encroach upon suburban America.
NEWS
By Aron U. Raskas | January 9, 2001
YASSER ARAFAT has acted with "ambivalent attitudes toward terrorism, and at times outright complicity." The Palestinian Authority's non-compliance with its commitments has "actually led to a repeated pattern of abuse, misconduct and outright violence on the part of the PA." Right-wing rhetoric? No. These and similar statements represent the official position of Israel's government set forth in a white paper, "Palestinian Authority and P.L.O. Non-Compliance with Signed Agreements: A Record of Bad Faith and Misconduct."
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