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By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | December 28, 1993
About 150 Holocaust survivors were brought together in Israel by Steven Spielberg on the next-to-last day of filming of the director's epic movie "Schindler's List."The survivors were gathered at a reception to meet the cast of the movie and to prepare for the next day's filming of a scene in which they would visit the actual grave of Oskar Schindler, the German industrialist who saved their lives nearly a half-century before.But the reunion atmosphere of the evening took a back seat to an interesting phenomenon, according to producer Gerald Molen.
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By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 2003
Two Holocaust survivors told their stories of courage to an enraptured group of about 40 sixth-graders and their parents at Folly Quarter Middle School in Ellicott City last week. The two women recounted their childhood memories - one of being hidden in convents and homes, and one of being sent to America to live with strangers - with a positive message of the goodness of those who helped them. They each sprinkled their tales with humor to help get their points across that, although there were horrors, it was not a completely dark period.
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FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 16, 1994
The majority of the action tonight is in the nonfiction area. ABC's "Turning Point" and CBS' "48 Hours" fight for viewers in prime time, while independent TV and cable offerings include biographical portraits of Oskar Schindler, Harold Lloyd and Elvis Presley.* "Turning Point" (10-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Last week it was Charles Manson and company, in a "Turning Point" hour that profiled some of the killers on a murder spree. This week it was supposed to be a profile of the victims of a killer on a murder spree in Gainesville, Fla. (what range; what variety)
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | October 21, 1994
Thomas Keneally was mindful of his youthful audience at Sudbrook Magnet Middle School yesterday, but he didn't exactly handle them with kid gloves.He skirted the sexual exploits of his famous hero, Oskar Schindler, by saying "he was a terrible fellow to be married to," but he did not diminish the horrors of the Holocaust as he talked about "Schindler's List," Mr. Keneally's 1982 book that was made into an Academy Award-winning movie."
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | October 21, 1994
Thomas Keneally was mindful of his youthful audience at Sudbrook Magnet Middle School yesterday, but he didn't exactly handle them with kid gloves.He skirted the sexual exploits of his famous hero, Oskar Schindler, by saying "he was a terrible fellow to be married to," but he did not diminish the horrors of the Holocaust as he talked about "Schindler's List," Mr. Keneally's 1982 book that was made into an Academy Award-winning movie."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 21, 1994
"The Last Butterfly," which opens today at the Westview, might be best considered a footnote to another film already in the market, Steven Spielberg's "Schindler's List."But it's not really an attempt to "cash in" on Spielberg or the Holocaust, as it was clearly made some years back, when the events of 1939-1945 were box office poison. It turns out to be in its own way an engaging and tragic memorial to the darkest of all times.Like "Schindler's List," it re-creates the iconography of the Holocaust, though since the director, Karel Kachyna, isn't nearly the dynamic artist that Spielberg is, his compositions are more inert and lack the thunderous force of Spielberg's.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 30, 1993
"I hate the word 'survivor,' " Leopold Page says. "That word is for someone who has survived a car crash, a plane crash. I am more than a survivor. I am a witness to the truth."The truth that Mr. Page and his wife, Mila, witnessed -- and survived -- was the Holocaust, the Nazi genocide that killed 6 million European Jews during the World War II.But there is another truth as well, and one that Leopold Page was responsible for bringing to the world. It is about one man, Oskar Schindler, who cheated the Nazis of some 1,100 victims -- Leopold and Mila among them -- and whose story has been retold by director Steven Spielberg in his new film, "Schindler's List."
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 2003
Two Holocaust survivors told their stories of courage to an enraptured group of about 40 sixth-graders and their parents at Folly Quarter Middle School in Ellicott City last week. The two women recounted their childhood memories - one of being hidden in convents and homes, and one of being sent to America to live with strangers - with a positive message of the goodness of those who helped them. They each sprinkled their tales with humor to help get their points across that, although there were horrors, it was not a completely dark period.
NEWS
March 14, 1997
Anna Duklauer Perl, 74, who survived the Holocaust with the help of German industrialist Oskar Schindler, died Tuesday in Virginia Beach, Va. Pub Date: 3/14/97
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 21, 1994
Will tonight be the night in which Oscar meets Oskar? "Schindler's List," the Steven Spielberg-directed film about Oskar Schindler, is one of the major movies up for an Academy Award tonight. One good omen for Spielberg fans: He's one of the guests tonight on "The Barbara Walters Special," and a pre-Oscar chat with Ms. Walters worked well enough for Clint Eastwood last year, when he won for "Unforgiven." Given that 1-2 punch on ABC, there's no other place to be tonight -- and the rival networks seem to concede as much.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 16, 1994
The majority of the action tonight is in the nonfiction area. ABC's "Turning Point" and CBS' "48 Hours" fight for viewers in prime time, while independent TV and cable offerings include biographical portraits of Oskar Schindler, Harold Lloyd and Elvis Presley.* "Turning Point" (10-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Last week it was Charles Manson and company, in a "Turning Point" hour that profiled some of the killers on a murder spree. This week it was supposed to be a profile of the victims of a killer on a murder spree in Gainesville, Fla. (what range; what variety)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 21, 1994
"The Last Butterfly," which opens today at the Westview, might be best considered a footnote to another film already in the market, Steven Spielberg's "Schindler's List."But it's not really an attempt to "cash in" on Spielberg or the Holocaust, as it was clearly made some years back, when the events of 1939-1945 were box office poison. It turns out to be in its own way an engaging and tragic memorial to the darkest of all times.Like "Schindler's List," it re-creates the iconography of the Holocaust, though since the director, Karel Kachyna, isn't nearly the dynamic artist that Spielberg is, his compositions are more inert and lack the thunderous force of Spielberg's.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 30, 1993
"I hate the word 'survivor,' " Leopold Page says. "That word is for someone who has survived a car crash, a plane crash. I am more than a survivor. I am a witness to the truth."The truth that Mr. Page and his wife, Mila, witnessed -- and survived -- was the Holocaust, the Nazi genocide that killed 6 million European Jews during the World War II.But there is another truth as well, and one that Leopold Page was responsible for bringing to the world. It is about one man, Oskar Schindler, who cheated the Nazis of some 1,100 victims -- Leopold and Mila among them -- and whose story has been retold by director Steven Spielberg in his new film, "Schindler's List."
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | December 28, 1993
About 150 Holocaust survivors were brought together in Israel by Steven Spielberg on the next-to-last day of filming of the director's epic movie "Schindler's List."The survivors were gathered at a reception to meet the cast of the movie and to prepare for the next day's filming of a scene in which they would visit the actual grave of Oskar Schindler, the German industrialist who saved their lives nearly a half-century before.But the reunion atmosphere of the evening took a back seat to an interesting phenomenon, according to producer Gerald Molen.
NEWS
November 4, 2008
On the web * A genealogy Web site is launching what it's billing as the world's largest online collection of Jewish family history records. Ancestry.com has partnered with two organizations for the project - JewishGen, an affiliate of New York's Museum of Jewish Heritage, and the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, an overseas humanitarian aid organization. The online collection, which was announced last week, features millions of historic Jewish records including Oskar Schindler's list - the names of almost 2,000 Jews saved by a German businessman who employed them.
NEWS
December 18, 2005
By any standard, Schindler's List is a terrific film. It's a moving account of Oskar Schindler's efforts to save Jews from Auschwitz by employing them in his factory. Critics have lauded it as the finest movie ever made about the Holocaust. The American Film Institute named it as one of the top 10 films of all time. But you won't find Montgomery County high school seniors watching it in class. That's because they can't. Schindler's List is rated R. And under a new policy, high schools can't show R-rated movies, nor can middle schools show any movie rated PG-13.
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