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Osiris Therapeutics

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By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1997
Osiris Therapeutics Inc. yesterday withdrew its plans to complete an initial public offering, citing general market volatility and unfavorable conditions for new biotechnology issues.The company intended to go public this month, hoping to raise about $30 million to further research and development efforts, said James S. Burns, Osiris' chief executive officer.The company moved to Baltimore in 1995 from Cleveland.Instead, the company will consider an IPO in the next six to 12 months. In the meantime, Burns said, there's enough cash to carry the company through the next four years.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Osiris Therapeutics cut its quarterly losses in half as it more than doubled sales of its stem cell-based medical treatments used in wound care and sports medicine, but it widely missed Wall Street analysts' expectations. Sales grew to $13.3 million in the quarter ended June 30, up from $5.3 million in the same quarter of 2013. Losses narrowed to $1.9 million from $3.8 million over the same period. When solely considering Osiris' operations, excluding any long-term costs, officials at the Columbia-based company said losses narrowed to $66,000.
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BUSINESS
December 11, 2007
Osiris Therapeutics Shares rose 79 cents, or 6.4 percent, to $13.12. The Columbia-based developer of treatments using adult stem cells said its experimental therapy Prochymal was given fast-track review by the FDA.
BUSINESS
The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
Shares in Osiris Therapeutics Inc. fell 7.6 percent Tuesday after the company announced that C. Randal Mills will step down as its president and CEO for personal reasons. Mills will remain as a strategic advisor to the Columbia-based firm that develops stem cell-based products to treat conditions in orthopedic, sports medicine and wound care markets. Lode Debrabandere, the firm's chief operating officer, will become president and CEO, pending approval of the Osiris board. Debrabandere joined Osiris in 2006 to lead its marquee unit developing the drug Prochymal to treat Crohn's disease.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Osiris Therapeutics cut its quarterly losses in half as it more than doubled sales of its stem cell-based medical treatments used in wound care and sports medicine, but it widely missed Wall Street analysts' expectations. Sales grew to $13.3 million in the quarter ended June 30, up from $5.3 million in the same quarter of 2013. Losses narrowed to $1.9 million from $3.8 million over the same period. When solely considering Osiris' operations, excluding any long-term costs, officials at the Columbia-based company said losses narrowed to $66,000.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 18, 2012
A Columbia-based biotechnology company said this week it received the world's first government approval to market a stem cell drug , in Canada. Osiris Therapeutics, founded in 1992, spent 17 years developing a stem cell therapy that offers anti-inflammatory and tissue-regeneration properties. The first treatment it has received approval for this week will help treat children who've received bone marrow transplants that their bodies have rejected. The condition, known as acute graft-versus-host disease, or GvHD,  is fatal to 80 percent of the children who contract it, the company said.  C. Randal Mills, president and CEO of Osiris, said in a conference call Friday morning that the company has spent the past eight years navigating clinical trials and regulatory paperwork in a mission to be the first approved stem cell treatment in the world.  “During the past eight years, we have not wavered from that mission,” Mills said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
When Osiris Therapeutics disclosed an agreement last week resolving concerns from federal regulators, the Columbia biotech firm pitched it as a win. The deal doesn't require changes to its marketing of Grafix bandages, Osiris said, and also gives it the opportunity to get a biologics license that could improve international prospects for the product. But some news stories — and at least one Wall Street analyst team — described the U.S. Food and Drug Administration agreement in entirely different terms.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
Columbia-based Osiris Therapeutics Inc., a biotechnology company developing stem cell-based treatments, beat Wall Street analysts' estimates with a reported loss of $4.3 million in the second quarter, which ended June 30. The firm, which earlier this year drew international headlines for having the world's first stem cell drug approved by a major country, posted a loss of 13 cents per share. Analysts polled by MarketWatch had expected a 15-cent-per-share loss. The company said its revenues from biosurgery products - which are used to improve wound healing and tissue regeneration - rose 43 percent, to $1.6 million, from the first quarter.
BUSINESS
The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
Shares in Osiris Therapeutics Inc. fell 7.6 percent Tuesday after the company announced that C. Randal Mills will step down as its president and CEO for personal reasons. Mills will remain as a strategic advisor to the Columbia-based firm that develops stem cell-based products to treat conditions in orthopedic, sports medicine and wound care markets. Lode Debrabandere, the firm's chief operating officer, will become president and CEO, pending approval of the Osiris board. Debrabandere joined Osiris in 2006 to lead its marquee unit developing the drug Prochymal to treat Crohn's disease.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 17, 1998
Baltimore-based Osiris Therapeutics Inc. said yesterday that it has struck an alliance with an Italian research group to develop treatments to help connective tissue cells regenerate quickly after chemotherapy, bone injuries and connective tissue disorders.Under the agreement, Osiris said it will supply $1 million in research funding to the Center for Advanced Biotechnology at the Institute for Cancer Research and the University of Genoa, Italy. Osiris said the alliance will seek to build on research by Dr. Ranieri Cancedda at the Center for Advanced Biotechnology.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
When Osiris Therapeutics disclosed an agreement last week resolving concerns from federal regulators, the Columbia biotech firm pitched it as a win. The deal doesn't require changes to its marketing of Grafix bandages, Osiris said, and also gives it the opportunity to get a biologics license that could improve international prospects for the product. But some news stories — and at least one Wall Street analyst team — described the U.S. Food and Drug Administration agreement in entirely different terms.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
Columbia-based Osiris Therapeutics Inc., a biotechnology company developing stem cell-based treatments, beat Wall Street analysts' estimates with a reported loss of $4.3 million in the second quarter, which ended June 30. The firm, which earlier this year drew international headlines for having the world's first stem cell drug approved by a major country, posted a loss of 13 cents per share. Analysts polled by MarketWatch had expected a 15-cent-per-share loss. The company said its revenues from biosurgery products - which are used to improve wound healing and tissue regeneration - rose 43 percent, to $1.6 million, from the first quarter.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 18, 2012
A Columbia-based biotechnology company said this week it received the world's first government approval to market a stem cell drug , in Canada. Osiris Therapeutics, founded in 1992, spent 17 years developing a stem cell therapy that offers anti-inflammatory and tissue-regeneration properties. The first treatment it has received approval for this week will help treat children who've received bone marrow transplants that their bodies have rejected. The condition, known as acute graft-versus-host disease, or GvHD,  is fatal to 80 percent of the children who contract it, the company said.  C. Randal Mills, president and CEO of Osiris, said in a conference call Friday morning that the company has spent the past eight years navigating clinical trials and regulatory paperwork in a mission to be the first approved stem cell treatment in the world.  “During the past eight years, we have not wavered from that mission,” Mills said.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2008
Osiris Therapeutics Inc. Shares rose $1.29 to $13.86 after the Columbia-based company said the U.S. government will pay it up to $224.7 million to develop and stockpile its stem cell treatment for radiation exposure.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | February 10, 2006
As the debate rages in Annapolis over state funding for stem cell work, Osiris Therapeutics has largely managed to avoid the fray. This, despite the fact that the Baltimore drugmaker is thought to be the only company in the nation with a commercialized product derived from stem cells. But that all changed this week when the governor came calling on the company in Fells Point as a backdrop to advocate his initiatives. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced plans last month to provide millions for stem cell research, although an economic aide briefly caused a stir by mistakenly suggesting the program favored non-embryonic research, echoing a larger national political controversy.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2002
William H. Pursley, William H. Pursley has enjoyed considerable success as a biotech executive. Now he faces a raft of challenges as the new chief executive officer of Osiris Therapeutics Inc. The Baltimore-based company, which develops treatments designed to renew injured connective tissue such as muscle and bone, has its third CEO this year and fourth since 1994, when Maryland officials used a $3.1 million state-backed loan and a $500,000 equity investment...
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | February 10, 2006
As the debate rages in Annapolis over state funding for stem cell work, Osiris Therapeutics has largely managed to avoid the fray. This, despite the fact that the Baltimore drugmaker is thought to be the only company in the nation with a commercialized product derived from stem cells. But that all changed this week when the governor came calling on the company in Fells Point as a backdrop to advocate his initiatives. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced plans last month to provide millions for stem cell research, although an economic aide briefly caused a stir by mistakenly suggesting the program favored non-embryonic research, echoing a larger national political controversy.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2002
Osiris Therapeutics Inc., a company the state has backed with millions of dollars after luring it from Cleveland to be "part of the foundation" of Maryland's biotechnology industry, has lost virtually its entire top management team and all but a single company director. The departures - which include Osiris Chief Executive Officer Annemarie B. Moseley and her interim replacement - have added even more uncertainty to an already difficult future for the Baltimore company, which develops therapeutic treatments for people, a business in which the risk of failure is inherently high.
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