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By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | May 13, 2008
It's taken on drug addiction and tackled school suspensions. It's helped dozens of social entrepreneurs start nonprofits in some of the dreariest corners of Baltimore and along the way forged strong bonds with the city's political, social and financial elite. And now, after a decade of work, the Open Society Institute-Baltimore, an experiment in social urban philanthropy, is celebrating. The organization that billionaire financier George Soros created to tackle some of the city's most intractable problems is turning 10. And it is on target to meet Soros' challenge of raising $20 million from local sources by 2010, which he would increase with $10 million more.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
Standing near a coal-fired stove in the kitchen of Joe Squared, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake tossed extra arugula on a slab of dough to create a "Bmore Gives More" pizza. The restaurant was taking part in #GivingTuesday, a day designed to foster online and other charitable contributions after the holiday shopping of Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Rawlings-Blake said she wanted to do her part to "make sure Baltimore is the most generous city in all of the country" when the day's donations are tallied.
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NEWS
May 13, 2008
Tyrone Lewis had two passions - being a cook and drugs. Hooked on heroin for 15 years, the Baltimore native traces the start of his addiction to a shot of hard liquor given to him when he was 7 by his grandfather. He managed to get and keep - at least for a while - a series of cooking jobs. But he readily admits that "drugs always came first." Now 45, Mr. Lewis has been clean for four years and serves as the kitchen manager for the Dogwood Restaurant in Hampden. He is also the lead apprentice for Chefs in the Making, a culinary training program for recovering addicts, ex-offenders and the homeless started by Dogwood co-owners Galen and Bridget Sampson.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
On the field next to Northeast Middle School, young refugees Abhishek Yonghang and Ahmed Osman kicked a soccer ball around, each grateful for the common connection as they adjust to a new life far from their former homes in Nepal and Somalia. Three miles away in a classroom at Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, junior Wayne Young slipped a suit jacket over his school uniform for debate practice with the Urban Debate League, trying to "look the part" of the Harvard law grad he envisions himself to one day be. The lives of these Baltimore teens are among the thousands influenced by George Soros, a billionaire philanthropist who decided 15 years ago that the city, with severe crime and poverty and just enough potential, was ripe for an experiment.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2005
Even before he arrived at City Hall yesterday to make official his $20 million challenge to Baltimore, billionaire George Soros was a tad closer to raising the funds needed to keep the local office of his Open Society Institute going. At least $1.4 million has been raised - most of it from the Annie E. Casey Foundation - since the campaign was announced last month. Soros, who opened OSI-Baltimore in 1998 with the goal of studying urban ills and solving them, has promised to pledge $10 million of his own money if locals can meet his challenge to raise $20 million.
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENberg | August 27, 1991
Washington -- Why is the National Institutes of Health in marathon controversies over its handling of scientific misdeeds? The answer is surprising: Not enough lawyers.The National Institutes of Health entrust fraud-busting to scientists, with only a limited role for lawyers, though fraud cases involve money, reputations and careers, all historically enmeshed legal protections. The scientists on fraud patrol have naively bungled procedural matters, causing derailment of some long-running cases.
NEWS
May 16, 2005
GEORGE SOROS was never here to stay. That's not how he operates. The Hungarian-born billionaire invests money to attack tough societal problems with the expectation that a city or organization will eventually assume the work - and that's as it should be. Philanthropic dollars are best spent to empower individuals and communities. When Mr. Soros' Open Society Institute chose Baltimore as its first regional city of interest in 1998, this newspaper viewed it as a "positive step." He pledged to spend at least $25 million on some of Baltimore's most intractable problems - drug abuse, struggling schools, youth crime, unemployment.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
On the field next to Northeast Middle School, young refugees Abhishek Yonghang and Ahmed Osman kicked a soccer ball around, each grateful for the common connection as they adjust to a new life far from their former homes in Nepal and Somalia. Three miles away in a classroom at Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, junior Wayne Young slipped a suit jacket over his school uniform for debate practice with the Urban Debate League, trying to "look the part" of the Harvard law grad he envisions himself to one day be. The lives of these Baltimore teens are among the thousands influenced by George Soros, a billionaire philanthropist who decided 15 years ago that the city, with severe crime and poverty and just enough potential, was ripe for an experiment.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
Ten Baltimore organizations have received $2.6 million in matching grants from philanthropist George Soros to fund programs intended to ease escalating needs amid the economic downturn, the Open Society Institute's city chapter announced. Soros created the Special Fund for Poverty Alleviation to help people particularly affected by the dismal financial climate. He allocated a total of $5 million for OSI's Baltimore office, the remainder of which will be distributed in 2010. "In this particular time with the economic recession, some populations that are most vulnerable have been very hard hit," said Diana Morris, OSI-Baltimore's director.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | April 3, 2006
Last May, when billionaire financier George Soros challenged Baltimore to raise $20 million to support programs to reduce drug addiction, bolster school reform, and decrease juvenile delinquency, he said he was confident that local "Robin Hoods" would pitch in. Nearly a year later, officials at Soros' Open Society Institute-Baltimore say they are well on their way to meeting that challenge, thanks in part to large contributions from two local nonprofits that...
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 20, 2013
Has it been mentioned anywhere that the couple who ran the Dogwood Restaurant in Hampden tried to change the lives of desperate people while serving good food and drink? There aren't a lot of businesses willing to hire ex-offenders and recovering drug addicts. It's a bother. It comes with risks, and there are plenty of attorneys to warn clients about "negligence in hiring," and the liability that brings. But the Dogwood believed in giving second chances, so attention must be paid, however late the notice.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2011
Two advocacy groups are criticizing the state school board for failing to act more quickly to address high suspension rates and inequities in the way students are disciplined from one district to another. In a letter to the school board, the Open Society Institute-Baltimore and the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland expressed "extreme concern about the continuing high, and disproportionate, levels of suspensions of students in Maryland public schools and the lack of significant progress in acting upon this situation.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2010
Seven Baltimore Community Fellows were announced Monday by the Open Society Institute. They are: •Stephanie Murdock, who heads the nonprofit group Skatepark of Baltimore. •Gary Ashbeck, who wants to make more locally produced food available to residents of the Irvington, Yale Heights and Beechfield communities; •Meshelle Foreman Shields, a professional comic who will help young black women take pride in their heritage; •Jessica Turral, who will use her grant money to connect young men in the local juvenile justice system with mental health services and case management while they await trial and after they are released; •Rebecca Coleman, who will launch the Baltimore Creditor Abuse Prevention Project to protect low-income residents who have been victims of creditor abuse; •Koli Tengella, a teacher who is developing a theater troupe that will use poetry, dance and hip-hop to explore social justice issues; and •Sarah Tooley, whose work with 901 Arts, a community-based arts organization in Better Waverly, helps encourage youth leaders.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
The Open Society Institute of Baltimore, a foundation funded by billionaire philanthropist George Soros, is giving $1.5 million to four city nonprofits for job training for low-income residents. The award will be accompanied by another $1.5 million of state and federal funds. The $3 million in funding will help provide job training and placement services to 141 people with criminal convictions who otherwise would be unable to find work. The four nonprofits receiving funding are the Center for Urban Families, Civic Works, Group Ministries and the Job Opportunities Task Force.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
Ten Baltimore organizations have received $2.6 million in matching grants from philanthropist George Soros to fund programs intended to ease escalating needs amid the economic downturn, the Open Society Institute's city chapter announced. Soros created the Special Fund for Poverty Alleviation to help people particularly affected by the dismal financial climate. He allocated a total of $5 million for OSI's Baltimore office, the remainder of which will be distributed in 2010. "In this particular time with the economic recession, some populations that are most vulnerable have been very hard hit," said Diana Morris, OSI-Baltimore's director.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | May 13, 2008
It's taken on drug addiction and tackled school suspensions. It's helped dozens of social entrepreneurs start nonprofits in some of the dreariest corners of Baltimore and along the way forged strong bonds with the city's political, social and financial elite. And now, after a decade of work, the Open Society Institute-Baltimore, an experiment in social urban philanthropy, is celebrating. The organization that billionaire financier George Soros created to tackle some of the city's most intractable problems is turning 10. And it is on target to meet Soros' challenge of raising $20 million from local sources by 2010, which he would increase with $10 million more.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | February 24, 1992
The University of Maryland, apparently under pressure from the National Institutes of Health's scientific integrity unit, is reopening an investigation of a professor it cleared of misconduct 10 months ago.The professor is Gerald M. Rosen, a chemist and chairman of the department of pharmacology and toxicology at the School of Pharmacy. He was accused by a researcher in his lab of lifting data from old experiments and publishing them as new in papers financed by more than $500,000 in federal grants over the past decade.
TOPIC
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2005
When Diana Morris was tapped in 1997 to head the Open Society Institute's Baltimore office, she thought she would disperse $25 million to worthy causes here over five years and be done with it. Almost eight years later, Morris has been challenged by her boss, billionaire and OSI founder George Soros, to raise $20 million to keep the office open. Soros has already spent $50 million - twice the amount he originally promised - in the city he refers to as a "laboratory" for reform. Now, he's dangling an additional $10 million to tempt locals to step up. Morris - an attorney who worked for the Ford Foundation for 10 years in Africa and Europe - is in hot pursuit of the money.
NEWS
May 13, 2008
Tyrone Lewis had two passions - being a cook and drugs. Hooked on heroin for 15 years, the Baltimore native traces the start of his addiction to a shot of hard liquor given to him when he was 7 by his grandfather. He managed to get and keep - at least for a while - a series of cooking jobs. But he readily admits that "drugs always came first." Now 45, Mr. Lewis has been clean for four years and serves as the kitchen manager for the Dogwood Restaurant in Hampden. He is also the lead apprentice for Chefs in the Making, a culinary training program for recovering addicts, ex-offenders and the homeless started by Dogwood co-owners Galen and Bridget Sampson.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | March 21, 2007
In a contest that was a test of endurance as much as spelling prowess, it was a relatively easy word, symbiosis, that clinched a trip to the Scripps National Spelling Bee for Heather desJardins-Park. Three hours after the Howard County Library Spelling Bee had begun, seven contestants remained on the Howard High School stage at 10 p.m., having survived nine rounds. The final 30 minutes of Friday night's competition came down to two spellers - Heather desJardins-Park, an eighth-grader at Lime Kiln Middle School, and Harsha Neerchal, a seventh-grader at Burleigh Manor Middle School.
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