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NEWS
January 11, 2000
This is an edited excerpt of a Chicago Tribune editorial, which was published Friday. FACING a storm of criticism, Labor Secretary Alexis Herman has backed away from a letter put out by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration that says employers are obligated to assure safe working conditions for employees who work from home. But she has yet to say whether the policy has been rescinded. It should be, as befits one of the most harebrained ideas to come from Washington in years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
A Baltimore-based temporary staffing agency faces a $6,000 fine in connection with the death of an employee, who was killed last December after being crushed by a conveyor system at an Amazon fulfillment center in New Jersey. Abacus - The Corporate Services Co., Baltimore, which employed temporary worker Ronald Smith, and three other temp agencies failed to conduct assessments of the safety hazards at the Avenel plant before assigning workers, according to U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
The federal government's workplace safety watchdog has found "serious" violations in the January death of a civilian diver in the underwater testing facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground. The findings issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration this week are the first public admonition over the death of George H. Lazzaro Jr., the 41-year-old Army contractor who died Jan. 30 while performing routine maintenance in the manmade tank known as the Super Pond. Lazzaro, a former Marine who lived in Baltimore County, was the first of three divers to die in the Super Pond in less than a month.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Charter pilot Martin Campanella said he thought he was doing the right thing when he refused to fly a plane he believed was unsafe. The Forest Hill resident said he was fired after he made an emergency landing with several passengers aboard a 10-seat corporate jet and then refused to fly the damaged aircraft to the charter company's headquarters. After getting fired, he said, he nearly lost his house and struggled with mounting anxiety and family tension. Now an administrative law judge for the U.S. Department of Labor decided the employer violated a federal law that prevents employment-related retaliation against air carrier employees acting in the interest of safety.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Charter pilot Martin Campanella said he thought he was doing the right thing when he refused to fly a plane he believed was unsafe. The Forest Hill resident said he was fired after he made an emergency landing with several passengers aboard a 10-seat corporate jet and then refused to fly the damaged aircraft to the charter company's headquarters. After getting fired, he said, he nearly lost his house and struggled with mounting anxiety and family tension. Now an administrative law judge for the U.S. Department of Labor decided the employer violated a federal law that prevents employment-related retaliation against air carrier employees acting in the interest of safety.
NEWS
By Daniel Horgan and Daniel Horgan,States News Service | March 4, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Members of a congressional subcommittee have blasted Occupational Safety and Health Administration officials for allegedly neglecting the safety of 3 million federal workers.The subcommittee said the neglect results in needless deaths and injuries each year.Last year, OSHA spent less than 1 percent of its budget on safety programs. Only 13 OSHA inspectors monitor the safety of the massive federal work force, testimony at the hearing on a proposed federal worker safety bill revealed.
NEWS
By MARK WILSON | September 3, 1995
America's labor law needs reform. After Labor Day, Congress will begin debating proposals to improve the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and merge it with the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA).The goal of these reforms is to redefine the role of the federal government in workplace health and safety from that of heavy-handed regulator to one of cooperative partner. Over the past 25 years, the federal government has been increasingly perceived as more concerned with maintaining bureaucracies and filling out paperwork than with working cooperatively with business to make workplaces safer.
NEWS
By Andrew Schneider and Andrew Schneider,Sun Reporter | December 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A government warning to mechanics that exposure to asbestos in brakes can cause deadly disease will not be removed from a federal Web site, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has decided not to suspend a scientist who had refused to water down the warning, OSHA officials said. Edwin Foulke Jr., the head of OSHA, made the decision to keep the five-page warning, called a Safety and Health Information Bulletin, on the agency's Web site. The safety bulletin was posted on an OSHA Web site in July and, like a similar Environmental Protection Agency warning to backyard mechanics and small garage operators, has been called scientifically invalid by industries that used, and use, asbestos.
BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen | March 14, 2004
Does a company have to supply heat in its warehouse or office? On what minimum setting does an employer have to keep the thermostat? While state and local governments may have regulations in this area, there is no national requirement for heating the workplace. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration says that while companies don't have to legally provide heat, OSHA will listen to worker complaints if you think the lack of heat jeopardizes your health and safety. Even though an employer doesn't have to keep employees' tootsies from freezing, it's shortsighted to consign workers to a deep freeze.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2003
The Bush administration is to announce today policy changes that it says will give the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration more power to crack down on companies that persistently flout workplace safety rules. Under the new policies, OSHA officials will be directed to conduct more follow-up inspections of companies that commit safety violations of "the highest severity," according to a memorandum obtained by The New York Times. Companies that fail to correct violations will in some cases find themselves facing contempt-of-court orders from federal judges to force action.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
The federal government's workplace safety watchdog has found "serious" violations in the January death of a civilian diver in the underwater testing facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground. The findings issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration this week are the first public admonition over the death of George H. Lazzaro Jr., the 41-year-old Army contractor who died Jan. 30 while performing routine maintenance in the manmade tank known as the Super Pond. Lazzaro, a former Marine who lived in Baltimore County, was the first of three divers to die in the Super Pond in less than a month.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2012
For years, the wastes from burning coal and producing copper have enjoyed a second life, used in sand-blasting to remove paint, rust and grime from ship's hulls, storage tanks, bridge trusses and other surfaces. Painting contractors, shipyard workers and thousands of others in Baltimore and across the country are said to use the black, gritty material called slag. Now, though, questions have been raised about whether those who do blasting with ground-up coal or copper slag may be unwittingly exposing themselves to toxic contaminants that could damage their health.
NEWS
By Andrew Schneider and Andrew Schneider,Sun Reporter | December 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A government warning to mechanics that exposure to asbestos in brakes can cause deadly disease will not be removed from a federal Web site, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has decided not to suspend a scientist who had refused to water down the warning, OSHA officials said. Edwin Foulke Jr., the head of OSHA, made the decision to keep the five-page warning, called a Safety and Health Information Bulletin, on the agency's Web site. The safety bulletin was posted on an OSHA Web site in July and, like a similar Environmental Protection Agency warning to backyard mechanics and small garage operators, has been called scientifically invalid by industries that used, and use, asbestos.
NEWS
By Andrew Schneider and Andrew Schneider,Sun reporter | November 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- It took six years to get federal worker safety officials to issue warnings to auto mechanics that the brakes they're working on could contain lethal asbestos fibers. But it took only three weeks after the warnings were posted before a former top federal official with ties to the auto industry reportedly pushed to have them removed. John Henshaw, a former head of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, called Aug. 15 for the agency to make changes to its warnings, according to documents obtained by The Sun. But Ira Wainless, an OSHA scientist who wrote the advisory bulletin about asbestos in brakes, refused, according to agency documents.
BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen | March 14, 2004
Does a company have to supply heat in its warehouse or office? On what minimum setting does an employer have to keep the thermostat? While state and local governments may have regulations in this area, there is no national requirement for heating the workplace. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration says that while companies don't have to legally provide heat, OSHA will listen to worker complaints if you think the lack of heat jeopardizes your health and safety. Even though an employer doesn't have to keep employees' tootsies from freezing, it's shortsighted to consign workers to a deep freeze.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2003
The Bush administration is to announce today policy changes that it says will give the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration more power to crack down on companies that persistently flout workplace safety rules. Under the new policies, OSHA officials will be directed to conduct more follow-up inspections of companies that commit safety violations of "the highest severity," according to a memorandum obtained by The New York Times. Companies that fail to correct violations will in some cases find themselves facing contempt-of-court orders from federal judges to force action.
NEWS
By Andrew Schneider and Andrew Schneider,Sun reporter | November 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- It took six years to get federal worker safety officials to issue warnings to auto mechanics that the brakes they're working on could contain lethal asbestos fibers. But it took only three weeks after the warnings were posted before a former top federal official with ties to the auto industry reportedly pushed to have them removed. John Henshaw, a former head of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, called Aug. 15 for the agency to make changes to its warnings, according to documents obtained by The Sun. But Ira Wainless, an OSHA scientist who wrote the advisory bulletin about asbestos in brakes, refused, according to agency documents.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A Labor Department lawyer told a federal appeals court yesterday that the government does not yet know enough about the health risks of tobacco smoke to justify any kind of smoking ban in offices and factories across the nation.The attorney, Charles F. James, urged the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals here to let the department follow its own pace in deciding whether to do anything to protect non-smoking workers from the "passive smoke" they inhale from other workers' cigarettes.
NEWS
January 11, 2000
This is an edited excerpt of a Chicago Tribune editorial, which was published Friday. FACING a storm of criticism, Labor Secretary Alexis Herman has backed away from a letter put out by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration that says employers are obligated to assure safe working conditions for employees who work from home. But she has yet to say whether the policy has been rescinded. It should be, as befits one of the most harebrained ideas to come from Washington in years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 22, 1999
WASHINGTON - The Clinton administration is about to propose new workplace rules that officials said would protect millions of workers from repetitive-stress injuries, one of the major sources of physical pain and disability in offices and factories across the country.In general, the rules would require employers to adopt full-scale ergonomics programs to minimize workplace hazards if even a few employees have suffered such injuries. Officials at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration said they planned to issue the regulations this month.
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