Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOscar
IN THE NEWS

Oscar

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Ever wanted to make like you won an Oscar without having to do anything like actually act in a movie? Area awards-show fans will get their chance Friday when one of the real statuettes makes a stop at Baltimore's Inner Harbor -- part of an 11-city "Roadtrip" to drum-up interest in the Feb. 24 awards ceremony. Fans will have the chance to pose with the Oscar, practice their acceptance speeches and snap a picture. Short of actually walking the red carpet on Academy Awards night, it may be the closest they'll ever come to one of the coveted figurines.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 10, 2013
The Oscar nominees for best picture owe a huge debt to books -- and the creativity of authors. Most of the top films are screen versions of tales that were woven by printed words (or digitized versions). That's not taking anything away from the writers who adapt a novel or work of non-fiction. I'm slogging my way through Victor Hugo's Les Miserables now, and it is a wonder that a hit musical and movie could be distilled from the sprawling 1800s. Here are other adaptations that join Les Mis in the best picture category: -- "Lincoln," drawn from " Team of Rivals" by Doris Kearns Goodwin.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and For The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Local film fans may have a leg up on the competition when it comes to their Oscar pools, thanks to the folks at the Maryland Film Festival and Chesapeake Film Festival. "Beasts of the Southern Wild," which enjoyed a long run at The Charles Theatre last year, received four nods among the Oscar nominations announced Thursday morning in Los Angeles. The film had its Baltimore premiere June 5 at MICA, before an audience culled from members of the Maryland Film Festival's Friends of the Festival program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | December 3, 2012
Well THAT wasn't how the Dixon brothers reunion was supposed to go down! For a second, right after the Governor accused Merle of being a traitor in Sunday night's episode, I was very scared that ol' Merle was going to get killed off right then and there. Thank goodness they just left us with a cliffhanger of the two staring each other down in front of a bloodthirsty crowd of Woodburians. We'll have to wait until Feb. 10 for answers, and by then we'll be eating any Subway footlong sub we want for only $5. #FebruAny I hope that Merle and Daryl go back-to-back, Roman gladiator fighting style, and brawl their way out of there, maiming the Governor in the process.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
Three decades and more than 25 films into his directing career, and Barry Levinson is still mining his hometown for movie ideas. But his latest film, a horror-mystery about a murderous parasite let loose in the Chesapeake Bay, is about as far removed from the genial atmosphere of his first as two movies could be. If "Diner" made audiences yearn for the bygone days of the neighborhood greasy spoon, "The Bay" - set in the fictional bayside town of...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
A fifteenth tropical depression of the Atlantic hurricane season has formed in the middle of the ocean, but forecasters don't expect it to survive long. The depression could become Tropical Storm Oscar over the next day or so. The forecast cone is taking it toward the northeast and the African coast, according to the National Hurricane Center. But forecaster's initial public advisory on the storm says it isn't expected to last long.  Tropical Storm Nadine is meanwhile moving northward and expected to become a post-tropical cyclone by Thursday or Friday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
Ervin M. Milner, who founded Milner Productions in the basement of his Northwest Baltimore home and turned it into one of the nation's largest producers of educational audiovisuals for physicians and hospitals, died Aug. 17 of complications from diabetes and kidney failure at the Springhouse in Pikesville assisted-living facility. He was 94. Mr. Milner was born in Baltimore and raised on Braddish Avenue. He attended city public schools at night and later the Baltimore College of Commerce.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
A Baltimore funeral home  is among those featured in an ESPN campaign from Academy-Award-winning director Errol Morris that launched today. The project, which includes 15-, 30- and 60-second trailers as well as a short documentary, looks at sports-themed funerals and fans who want to take their love of the games to the grave with them. The project is called "It's Not Crazy, It's Sports. " Morris visits the Kaczorowski Funeral Home in Dundalk where viewers get a look at an Orioles casket and hear about a Ravens-themed funeral.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | February 27, 2012
Perhaps taking her cue from President Obama, Supporting Actress Oscar winner celebrated her win by breaking into song backstage. Singing to the tune of Frank Sinatra's "It was a Very Good Year," Spencer tunefully warbled: "Oscar nominee/But now I'm a winner. " Not sure this will be a hit to match Sinatra's version, but it was nice to see Spencer so unabashedly happy. As for tonight's celebration: Noting she has to get back to work shortly, Spencer said, "I'm going to down a quarter of a glass of champagne.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Sun reporter | February 27, 2012
In his Oscar acceptance speech, "The Artist" director Michel Hazanavicius said he wanted to thank three people: "Billy Wilder, Billy Wilder and Billy Wilder. " Backstage, Hazanavicius was asked why he felt compelled to thank Wilder, the Oscar-winning director of such classics as "The Lost Weekend," "Double Indemnity" and "The Apartment," three times. "I thanked Billy Wilder three times," he replied, "because I had to keep it short. " Hazanavicius said he would have thanked his accomplished forebear 1,000 times if he could have, referring to the Austrian-born Wilder as "the perfect director" and "the soul of Hollywood.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.