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Oscar Wilde

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By John Muncie and John Muncie,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
"The Exquisite Life of Oscar Wilde," by Stephen Calloway andDavid Colvin. Welcome Rain. 112 page., $19.95.There's something to be said for hagiography, though not in polite company.In 1895, poet, essayist, playwright Oscar Wilde was convicted in an English court of practicing homosexuality, "the love that dare not speak its name." He spent two years in prison and died three years after his release, exiled in France and disgraced in the Victorian world.He and his literary reputation have long since been rehabilitated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Not to put too fine a point on it, "The Importance of Being Earnest" is the greatest comedy in the English language. If you harbor any doubt about that, you might want to consider therapy. Better yet, just head to the Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington, where a first-rate production of Oscar Wilde's gleaming and subversive work should persuade you. Its namesake notwithstanding, the company frequently delves into other repertoire and has given welcome attention to Wilde over the years.
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NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 12, 1995
"The Importance of Being Earnest" was first produced 100 years ago. But the professional stage company in residence at Howard Community College is certain that Oscar Wilde's satire of pomposity, arbitrary social mores and empty values remains as contemporary and entertaining as it was then.The two-hour comedy will be presented at 3 p.m. today and Nov. 19, and at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Smith Theatre in Howard Community College by the Rep Stage Company."Oscar Wilde was very much before his time," said Valerie Costantini, the company's artistic director and producer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
Although just about everybody recognizes Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" as a supremely brilliant comedy, the embrace of his other plays is usually not quite so hearty. Those earlier works have been faulted for being a little too stuffily Victorian in subject matter and view of the sexes, too obvious or contrived of plot, too skimpy with wit. Well, if Wilde's creativity had ceased with "An Ideal Husband," which premiered in 1895 just a few weeks before "Earnest," and if every production of that work were as incisive as the one currently being offered by Washington's Shakespeare Theatre Company, the playwright's reputation would still rank high.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 2, 2004
It'll be a season of art, spectacle and Oscar Wilde on area stages in 2004-2005. Center Stage opens with Lady Windermere's Fan, Wilde's comic look at Victorian mores, marriage and motherhood, directed by Irene Lewis. Coincidentally, Washington's Shakespeare Theatre will close its season with a production of the same Wilde comedy, starring Dixie Carter and directed by Keith Baxter. In between these two, Arena Stage in Washington will mount the playwright's best-known work, The Importance of Being Earnest.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczk | November 9, 1990
The Chesapeake High School Drama Club continues its tradition of presenting classics of theater history with the fall production of Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest." Performances are scheduled at 7 p.m. on Nov.29 and 30 and Dec. 1 in the auditorium.Penned by the noted Irish novelist and playwright, the play has been a staple in acting companies' repertoires since its premier on the English stage in 1895. Wilde's wit and observant criticism of all levels of society have continued to delight audiences for nearly 100 years.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2007
Anyone who enjoys thought-provoking drama will find it in Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde. And those who appreciate formidable acting talent also will find it the Dignity Players' production of this play, which opened last weekend at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Annapolis. Director Mickey Handwerger illuminates Moises Kaufman's intellectually stimulating work on the unlikely improvised minimalist theater, the eight-member all-male supporting cast does not disappoint, and lead actor Jim Gallagher gives the best performance I've ever seen on a local stage.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 9, 1998
Purity, says a character in Oscar Wilde's "A Woman of No Importance," "is the one subject of really national importance." The line draws a big laugh in director Michael Kahn's production at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre.An even bigger laugh comes a few lines later, when the same character adds, "The growing influence of women is the one reassuring thing in our political life. Women are always on the side of morality, public and private."But witty -- and surprisingly topical -- as such quips may be, it is the heartfelt emotion at the core of Kahn's stylish production that grants substance to the style.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 2001
The hero's fall from grace has been the stuff of tragedy since the Greeks invented the genre 2,500 years ago. And in the literary realm, no one has fallen faster and further - or with greater notoriety attached - than Oscar Wilde, the Irish-born playwright, novelist and poet. Wilde's homosexual affair with the son of a member of Britain's House of Lords scandalized Victorian London, and resulted in a sensational libel trial in which the author's revelations on the witness stand led to his arrest for sodomy and a humiliating prison term that broke his spirit as an artist and a man. Two gut-wrenching scenes from this sad, tacky, hypocrisy-laden affair provide grist for the dramatic mill in "The Judas Kiss," the David Hare play making its Washington-Baltimore area debut at Rep Stage in Columbia.
NEWS
September 22, 1996
"Capitol Offense" by Barbara Mikulski and Marylouise Oates. I find it to be very intriguing; you can really picture the senator (Mikulski) as Norie (the book's main character).I'm a big Oscar Wilde fan. I've just finished "Oscar Wilde's Guide to Modern Living," edited by John Calvin Batchelor and Craig McNeer. It's got a whole bunch of fun quotes and things - it's really a lot of fun.Kathy Hornig, director of special projects for the Baltimore Office of Promotions and Catonsville resident, is organizing next weekend's city book festival on Mount Vernon PlacePub Date: 9/22/96
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | April 19, 2009
There will be no shortage of star power at Center Stage next season. The troupe's major offerings for the 2009-2010 season were designed specifically to showcase the talents of some of the audience's favorite actors, including Larry O'Dwyer, Robert Dorfman and E. Faye Butler. O'Dwyer's comic talents will be tapped in the cross-dressing role of Lady Bracknell in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest. Dorfman will take time away from his busy film/television/theater career to perform David Sedaris' offbeat holiday monologue, The Santaland Diaries.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2007
Anyone who enjoys thought-provoking drama will find it in Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde. And those who appreciate formidable acting talent also will find it the Dignity Players' production of this play, which opened last weekend at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Annapolis. Director Mickey Handwerger illuminates Moises Kaufman's intellectually stimulating work on the unlikely improvised minimalist theater, the eight-member all-male supporting cast does not disappoint, and lead actor Jim Gallagher gives the best performance I've ever seen on a local stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2005
Address: blog.outer-court. com / quiz / What's the point?: This site, which is not affiliated with Google, but which is affiliated with a blog about Google, uses Google's image search to create a game. It shows you a sampling of images, and you have to guess the search term. What to look for: An off switch! OK, there isn't one, but it's so addictive you'll want one. Correct answers bring the player the bonus prize of quotes from people ranging from Oscar Wilde to Gandhi, so you will feel literate at the same time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carole Goldberg and Carole Goldberg,THE HARTFORD COURANT | October 10, 2004
Last Friday, Martha Stewart - or prisoner No. 55170-054, as she will be officially known -began five months of incarceration for her conviction on conspiracy and obstruction of justice charges in the Alderson minimum-security women's prison in West Virginia. That stint in the slammer will be followed by five more months of home confinement. Martha, of course, would not be Martha without a project to complete, and the thought of her just idly killing time for months on end, staring listlessly out some ugly barred window, is too horrid to contemplate.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 2, 2004
It'll be a season of art, spectacle and Oscar Wilde on area stages in 2004-2005. Center Stage opens with Lady Windermere's Fan, Wilde's comic look at Victorian mores, marriage and motherhood, directed by Irene Lewis. Coincidentally, Washington's Shakespeare Theatre will close its season with a production of the same Wilde comedy, starring Dixie Carter and directed by Keith Baxter. In between these two, Arena Stage in Washington will mount the playwright's best-known work, The Importance of Being Earnest.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2003
A typical Sunday is coming up, one with an abundance of concerts scheduled for mid-afternoon. If you're not among the lucky ones who have tickets for the sold-out season-opener of the Baltimore Choral Arts Society at 3 p.m. at Grace United Methodist Church, that still leaves you with more than enough options. You can hear one of Bach's extraordinary cantatas conducted by T. Herbert Dimmock at 3 p.m. at First English Lutheran Church, 3807 N. Charles St. It's free; for more information, call 410-235-2356.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 1, 2001
Oscar Wilde graces Columbia stage A few seasons back, Oscar Wilde was everywhere. "Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde" was an off-Broadway hit; there was a movie, "Wilde," starring Stephen Fry; and British playwright David Hare weighed in on Broadway with "The Judas Kiss." Area audiences have had a chance to see the first two; now Rep Stage in Columbia is offering the Baltimore-Washington premiere of the third, in previews beginning tonight and opening Sunday. Directed by Kasi Campbell and starring Nigel Reed, the two-act play begins on the night Wilde chose not to flee England and evade arrest; Act 2 takes place in Naples two years later.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2005
Address: blog.outer-court. com / quiz / What's the point?: This site, which is not affiliated with Google, but which is affiliated with a blog about Google, uses Google's image search to create a game. It shows you a sampling of images, and you have to guess the search term. What to look for: An off switch! OK, there isn't one, but it's so addictive you'll want one. Correct answers bring the player the bonus prize of quotes from people ranging from Oscar Wilde to Gandhi, so you will feel literate at the same time.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 2001
The hero's fall from grace has been the stuff of tragedy since the Greeks invented the genre 2,500 years ago. And in the literary realm, no one has fallen faster and further - or with greater notoriety attached - than Oscar Wilde, the Irish-born playwright, novelist and poet. Wilde's homosexual affair with the son of a member of Britain's House of Lords scandalized Victorian London, and resulted in a sensational libel trial in which the author's revelations on the witness stand led to his arrest for sodomy and a humiliating prison term that broke his spirit as an artist and a man. Two gut-wrenching scenes from this sad, tacky, hypocrisy-laden affair provide grist for the dramatic mill in "The Judas Kiss," the David Hare play making its Washington-Baltimore area debut at Rep Stage in Columbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 1, 2001
Oscar Wilde graces Columbia stage A few seasons back, Oscar Wilde was everywhere. "Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde" was an off-Broadway hit; there was a movie, "Wilde," starring Stephen Fry; and British playwright David Hare weighed in on Broadway with "The Judas Kiss." Area audiences have had a chance to see the first two; now Rep Stage in Columbia is offering the Baltimore-Washington premiere of the third, in previews beginning tonight and opening Sunday. Directed by Kasi Campbell and starring Nigel Reed, the two-act play begins on the night Wilde chose not to flee England and evade arrest; Act 2 takes place in Naples two years later.
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