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By Colin Nickerson and Colin Nickerson,Boston Globe | May 10, 1992
OSAKA, Japan -- Don't talk Tokyo in this burg. It is a subject on which the natives tend to be downright churlish."Japan is not Tokyo," insists Hironari Masago, president of the Osaka Chamber of Commerce. "Tokyo this, Tokyo that. All one hears about is Tokyo."This mammoth city, vigorous, prosperous and certainly no uglier than its rival, the capital city to the east, suffers a bad case of the second-place blues. Osaka is fighting hard to change its image and attract businesses, but it has centuries of inferiority to contend with.
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NEWS
October 22, 2007
KISHO KUROKAWA, 73 Architect Kisho Kurokawa, the influential Japanese architect and theorist behind projects including Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Malaysia, a futurist complex penetrated by a rain forest, died Oct. 12 in Tokyo. He was 73. The cause was heart failure, the Associated Press said, quoting a hospital spokeswoman. Mr. Kurokawa was one of the youngest founding members of Japan's Metabolist movement, which advocated an organic, renewable architecture that could evolve through the addition of clip-on modular units.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 3, 2002
OSAKA, Japan - The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra whisked into this affluent, congested city yesterday afternoon via one of the country's aptly named bullet trains from Hiroshima, with an extra little push from the Japanese press. The first notice to appear - papers here regularly take several days to run reviews - was carried in one of the national dailies, Mainichi Shimbun. The critic found much to praise about the orchestra's concert in Tokyo's Suntory Hall on Saturday, starting with an overall "enthusiasm and refreshing approach to the music."
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,Special to The Sun | August 26, 2007
Osaka, Japan -- The distance runners hate Osaka's oppressive heat and humidity. Just ask all those marathoners who endured brutal conditions yesterday morning. But Baltimore sprinter James Carter is learning to love the stifling weather at the track and field world championships. "I definitely like it," said the 29-year-old former Mervo and Hampton University star after breezing through an opening-round trial of the 400-meter hurdles in 49.52 seconds at Nagai Stadium last night. "It helps my warm-up.
SPORTS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 9, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- No one can accuse Tara Lipinski of not enjoying her Olympic experience.In fact, Lipinski has been having so much fun that she didn't want to leave yesterday for Osaka, where she will train at a private rink before returning Wednesday to Nagano."
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Staff Writer | January 22, 1994
Howard County police and the FBI have raided three Howard massage parlors, arresting five women after an eight-month investigation of interstate prostitution.Thirty-five police officers and more than a dozen federal agents served search warrants around 7:15 p.m. Thursday at the Osaka Express, in the 8900 block of Route 108 in Columbia; the Sun Spa, in the 3200 block of Corporate Court in Ellicott City; and the Lotus Shiatsu Spa, in the 7800 block of Washington Blvd. in Jessup."We're looking at the big picture and deciding what the scope of the problem is," said Lt. Jeffrey Spaulding, who heads the Howard County Police Department's vice and narcotics division.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,Special to The Sun | August 26, 2007
Osaka, Japan -- The distance runners hate Osaka's oppressive heat and humidity. Just ask all those marathoners who endured brutal conditions yesterday morning. But Baltimore sprinter James Carter is learning to love the stifling weather at the track and field world championships. "I definitely like it," said the 29-year-old former Mervo and Hampton University star after breezing through an opening-round trial of the 400-meter hurdles in 49.52 seconds at Nagai Stadium last night. "It helps my warm-up.
NEWS
October 22, 2007
KISHO KUROKAWA, 73 Architect Kisho Kurokawa, the influential Japanese architect and theorist behind projects including Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Malaysia, a futurist complex penetrated by a rain forest, died Oct. 12 in Tokyo. He was 73. The cause was heart failure, the Associated Press said, quoting a hospital spokeswoman. Mr. Kurokawa was one of the youngest founding members of Japan's Metabolist movement, which advocated an organic, renewable architecture that could evolve through the addition of clip-on modular units.
NEWS
By HEARST NEWSPAPERS | November 20, 1998
TOKYO -- As the House Judiciary Committee began impeachment hearings in Washington yesterday, President Clinton traveled more than 8,000 miles to Tokyo only to be confronted by an indignant Japanese housewife who questioned his apology to his wife and daughter for the Monica Lewinsky affair."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | December 24, 1990
Picture this: Jim Traber in Japan. Fumbling with the language. Foraging for a meal more substantial than sushi. Struggling against a system where obedience isn't requested, it's demanded.Imagine the baseball power hitter in a game where the strike zone is a suggestion and the sacrifice bunt is a first-inning weapon, where workouts consist of jogging, lifting, throwing, and swinging. And that's just before lunch.But a strange and wonderful thing occurred during Traber's first season in Japan.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 3, 2002
OSAKA, Japan - The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra whisked into this affluent, congested city yesterday afternoon via one of the country's aptly named bullet trains from Hiroshima, with an extra little push from the Japanese press. The first notice to appear - papers here regularly take several days to run reviews - was carried in one of the national dailies, Mainichi Shimbun. The critic found much to praise about the orchestra's concert in Tokyo's Suntory Hall on Saturday, starting with an overall "enthusiasm and refreshing approach to the music."
NEWS
By HEARST NEWSPAPERS | November 20, 1998
TOKYO -- As the House Judiciary Committee began impeachment hearings in Washington yesterday, President Clinton traveled more than 8,000 miles to Tokyo only to be confronted by an indignant Japanese housewife who questioned his apology to his wife and daughter for the Monica Lewinsky affair."
SPORTS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 9, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- No one can accuse Tara Lipinski of not enjoying her Olympic experience.In fact, Lipinski has been having so much fun that she didn't want to leave yesterday for Osaka, where she will train at a private rink before returning Wednesday to Nagano."
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF WRITER | January 5, 1997
OSAKA, Japan -- When Yutaka Mino looks at the ancient Chinese scrolls, the blue-and-white Korean porcelain and the Japanese teapots and Buddhas that surround him at the Osaka Municipal Museum of Art, he thinks less of the past than of a future filled with opportunities. As the director of a museum best known for its extraordinary collection of thousand-year-old Chinese paintings, he sees room for much else: A museum gift shop. A cafe. A public-relations office. Educational programs.All American-style, he says.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Staff Writer | January 22, 1994
Howard County police and the FBI have raided three Howard massage parlors, arresting five women after an eight-month investigation of interstate prostitution.Thirty-five police officers and more than a dozen federal agents served search warrants around 7:15 p.m. Thursday at the Osaka Express, in the 8900 block of Route 108 in Columbia; the Sun Spa, in the 3200 block of Corporate Court in Ellicott City; and the Lotus Shiatsu Spa, in the 7800 block of Washington Blvd. in Jessup."We're looking at the big picture and deciding what the scope of the problem is," said Lt. Jeffrey Spaulding, who heads the Howard County Police Department's vice and narcotics division.
FEATURES
By Colin Nickerson and Colin Nickerson,Boston Globe | May 10, 1992
OSAKA, Japan -- Don't talk Tokyo in this burg. It is a subject on which the natives tend to be downright churlish."Japan is not Tokyo," insists Hironari Masago, president of the Osaka Chamber of Commerce. "Tokyo this, Tokyo that. All one hears about is Tokyo."This mammoth city, vigorous, prosperous and certainly no uglier than its rival, the capital city to the east, suffers a bad case of the second-place blues. Osaka is fighting hard to change its image and attract businesses, but it has centuries of inferiority to contend with.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | October 7, 1990
OSAKA, Japan -- "What kind of relations do the police have with this community?"A man in his 50s ran his fingers over the gray stubble on his cheek last night and repeated the question with a smile of disbelief."
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF WRITER | January 5, 1997
OSAKA, Japan -- When Yutaka Mino looks at the ancient Chinese scrolls, the blue-and-white Korean porcelain and the Japanese teapots and Buddhas that surround him at the Osaka Municipal Museum of Art, he thinks less of the past than of a future filled with opportunities. As the director of a museum best known for its extraordinary collection of thousand-year-old Chinese paintings, he sees room for much else: A museum gift shop. A cafe. A public-relations office. Educational programs.All American-style, he says.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | December 24, 1990
Picture this: Jim Traber in Japan. Fumbling with the language. Foraging for a meal more substantial than sushi. Struggling against a system where obedience isn't requested, it's demanded.Imagine the baseball power hitter in a game where the strike zone is a suggestion and the sacrifice bunt is a first-inning weapon, where workouts consist of jogging, lifting, throwing, and swinging. And that's just before lunch.But a strange and wonderful thing occurred during Traber's first season in Japan.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | October 7, 1990
OSAKA, Japan -- "What kind of relations do the police have with this community?"A man in his 50s ran his fingers over the gray stubble on his cheek last night and repeated the question with a smile of disbelief."
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