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By Jeffrey M. Landaw and Jeffrey M. Landaw,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2003
George Orwell, born 100 years ago today, achieved so much in so little time (he died at age 46 in 1950) that he's become the subject of an intellectual parlor game: "What would Orwell say?" The game attracts so many players because, as the late British writer John Wain observed, Orwell "was born into an age in which the really suffocating nonsense was talked by reactionaries, and lived on into an age in which it was talked by progressives." That makes it possible for almost anybody to pick and choose something in Orwell's work that fits his prejudices.
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NEWS
February 5, 2012
Martin O'Malley's greatest accomplishment as governor has been the elimination of taxes in Maryland. We now have "investments," "conversations," "sacrifices," "choices" - and duplicity, hypocrisy, sanctimony, and Orwellian perversion of language. But no taxes. Furthermore, in Governor O'Malley's parallel universe, you can "cut" expenditures of money that the state never had and never budgeted, and thereby generate "savings" all the way to infinity - even as he lays plans to confiscate more and more of the people's money.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 18, 2004
A few things to keep your cinematic eye on this week: Orwell Rolls In His Grave, from writer-director Robert Kane Pappas, considers the question of whether there is too much government and big-business control of the media and the information it is charged with disseminating. The documentary film, featuring appearances by U.S. Rep. Bernie Sanders, Charles Lewis, Mark Crispin Miller, Vincent Bugliosi, Robert McChesney and even a cameo from Mr. Lightning Rod himself, Michael Moore, is this weekend's Cinema Sundays at the Charles offering.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | March 24, 2008
It's about time someone stood up for Big Brothers everywhere. Ever since that hack British scribbler George Orwell decided to pin the B.B. title on his fictional tyrant in his semi-hysterical novel 1984, eldest male siblings everywhere have been taking it on the chin. Never mind that since the beginning of time, big brothers have played a heroic role in their families. Think of Sonny Corleone, dying in a hail of bullets, rushing to protect his battered sister from her low-life husband.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norah Vincent and Norah Vincent,Special to the Sun | April 8, 2001
The moral force of his nonfiction is graced by personal involvement, generosity and self-sacrifice. Orwellian. It's the kind of word that drippy drunks drop in bars when they're trying to impress you. Which is strange, because everyone who passed the eighth grade has read "1984." Even so, Orwellian has a ring to it -- a kind of vulgate cache that makes a somewhat nobler savage of your average barfly. Sad, really. Because Orwell is so much more than the two works of fiction for which he is best known: "1984" and "Animal Farm."
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | August 27, 2000
George Orwell's contribution to human liberty, I will contend for the sake of argument, is greater than that of any other single man or woman in the 20th century. There is no remotely conclusive way to prove that. But his "Animal Farm" and "1984" are among the century's most widely read volumes. Their epiphanic truth did more to alert the reading population of the world to the innate perfidy of utopian totalitarianism - Left and Right - than any other argument, act, party or platform. When I was a college kid, the majority of my acquaintances were New York "progressives" -proudly "Red diaper babies."
NEWS
June 28, 2000
The student: Jessica Nauright, 15 School: Centennial High School Special achievement: Won first place in a writing contest called 2000 Letters About Literature sponsored by the Maryland Center for the Book. Her entry was a letter to George Orwell about his work "Down and Out in Paris and London." What she says about it: "When I got the envelope that said I had won, I was so excited because I had not heard from them [contest sponsors] in such a long time I thought that I had not won. The awards ceremony was held at the State House in Annapolis where I received my prize and was honored."
FEATURES
November 29, 1998
George Orwell(1903-1950)Born Eric Arthur Blair, Orwell was an English novelist, best known for "Animal Farm" and "1984.""Animal Farm," set on a barnyard with animals as the characters, is Orwell's expression of anti-Sovietism. "1984" is Orwell's interpretation of the future. He saw it as having an omnipresent demagogue known as "Big Brother."Orwell also wrote "Down and Out in Paris and London," after having lived among the lower classes in Europe. Orwell later wrote on his dread for communism in "Homage to Catalonia."
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | March 24, 2008
It's about time someone stood up for Big Brothers everywhere. Ever since that hack British scribbler George Orwell decided to pin the B.B. title on his fictional tyrant in his semi-hysterical novel 1984, eldest male siblings everywhere have been taking it on the chin. Never mind that since the beginning of time, big brothers have played a heroic role in their families. Think of Sonny Corleone, dying in a hail of bullets, rushing to protect his battered sister from her low-life husband.
NEWS
By TRB | August 30, 1993
Recently I was reading somewhere or other [about] an Italian curio dealer who attempted to sell a 17th-century crucifix to J.P. Morgan. [I]nside it was concealed a stiletto. What a perfect symbol of the Christian religion. --George OrwellWashington. -- No op-ed page in America would publish those words today, except (as here) when cited with obvious irony and/or attributed to a secular saint like Orwell. The words are actually from an Orwell notebook and were not published while he was alive.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 18, 2004
A few things to keep your cinematic eye on this week: Orwell Rolls In His Grave, from writer-director Robert Kane Pappas, considers the question of whether there is too much government and big-business control of the media and the information it is charged with disseminating. The documentary film, featuring appearances by U.S. Rep. Bernie Sanders, Charles Lewis, Mark Crispin Miller, Vincent Bugliosi, Robert McChesney and even a cameo from Mr. Lightning Rod himself, Michael Moore, is this weekend's Cinema Sundays at the Charles offering.
NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | May 30, 2004
A MONTH AGO, a large mistake by small-minded people did us all a giant favor. When Sinclair Broadcast Group refused to broadcast Ted Koppel reading the names of 700-plus Americans killed in Iraq, we received a quickie lesson in the political implications of memory: how a fairly neutral act - noting the names of the fallen, one by one - can, stupidly, be perceived as overtly political. Yes, this is an election year, and we're surrounded by slogans and the bending of truth. But names are names and the fallen are the fallen, and shame upon those who tamper with the dignity and the honor of those serving, and dying, for the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norman Birnbaum and Norman Birnbaum,Special to the Sun | November 30, 2003
The Cold War and the 20th century are over; new fears and quandaries beset us. George Orwell, however, is still with us. To think of politics in Great Britain and the United States is to recall his legacy. His belief that writing is giving one's word, that politics requires truthfulness, attests to his inexpungable Protestantism. He bore witness to democracy's torments, intellectuals' responsibilities and history's disappointments. Five years as a British policeman in occupied Burma gave Orwell experience of empire.
FEATURES
By Jeffrey M. Landaw and Jeffrey M. Landaw,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2003
George Orwell, born 100 years ago today, achieved so much in so little time (he died at age 46 in 1950) that he's become the subject of an intellectual parlor game: "What would Orwell say?" The game attracts so many players because, as the late British writer John Wain observed, Orwell "was born into an age in which the really suffocating nonsense was talked by reactionaries, and lived on into an age in which it was talked by progressives." That makes it possible for almost anybody to pick and choose something in Orwell's work that fits his prejudices.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | June 9, 2003
AUSTIN, Texas - I rarely find fault with Washington journalist Josh Marshall and his thoughtful blog "Talking Points Memo," but I beg to differ on this occasion. "My God," writes Mr. Marshall, "when they say down the memory hole, they ain't kiddin'! There now seems to be a secret competition - perhaps it was announced and I just didn't hear it - for the Iraq-hawk who can come up with the most ingenious, Orwellian, up-is-down rewriting of the history of the year-long lead-up to the Iraq war."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dinitia Smith and By Dinitia Smith,NEW YORK TIMES | December 1, 2002
What if Snowball had his chance? An American novelist has written a parody of Animal Farm, George Orwell's 1945 allegory about the evils of communism, in which the exiled pig, Snowball, returns to the farm and sets up a capitalist state, leading to misery for all the animals. The book, Snowball's Chance by John Reed, has just been published by Roof Books, a small independent press in New York. And the estate of George Orwell is not happy about it. William Hamilton, the British literary executor of the Orwell estate, objected to the parody in an e-mail message to the James T. Sherry, the publisher of Roof Books, stating, "The contemporary setting can only trivialize the tragedy of Orwell's mid-020th-century vision of totalitarianism."
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | August 30, 2001
ON THE FIRST morning of the first day of class, Anne Arundel County students hopped aboard school buses and found silent new passengers awaiting them: video cameras. In a different era, this might have provoked serious talk of George Orwell. Today, the most profound sound is a parental sigh: If it gets the kids home safely, that's all that matters. County school officials spent recent weeks getting enclosed cameras installed at the front of 85 school buses and, by winter, expect to outfit nearly 400 more.
NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | May 30, 2004
A MONTH AGO, a large mistake by small-minded people did us all a giant favor. When Sinclair Broadcast Group refused to broadcast Ted Koppel reading the names of 700-plus Americans killed in Iraq, we received a quickie lesson in the political implications of memory: how a fairly neutral act - noting the names of the fallen, one by one - can, stupidly, be perceived as overtly political. Yes, this is an election year, and we're surrounded by slogans and the bending of truth. But names are names and the fallen are the fallen, and shame upon those who tamper with the dignity and the honor of those serving, and dying, for the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Special to the Sun | March 3, 2002
In George Orwell's 1984, protagonist Winston Smith was forced to confront his worst fear in the dreaded Room 101. For crimes against Big Brother, Orwell's anti-hero was surrounded by his nightmare: rats. This, of course, was not his choice. He was not motivated by a cash prize. And a smirking host was nowhere to be seen. In 2002, all those awful accouterments have helped this once haunting literary device degenerate into the most moronic of mainstream television. Contestants on shows like Fear Factor volunteer to be trapped in a large container full of rats in order to win cash prizes.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | August 30, 2001
ON THE FIRST morning of the first day of class, Anne Arundel County students hopped aboard school buses and found silent new passengers awaiting them: video cameras. In a different era, this might have provoked serious talk of George Orwell. Today, the most profound sound is a parental sigh: If it gets the kids home safely, that's all that matters. County school officials spent recent weeks getting enclosed cameras installed at the front of 85 school buses and, by winter, expect to outfit nearly 400 more.
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