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November 15, 1990
A memorial service for Dr. Robert A. Robinson, a retired professor of orthopedic surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, will be held at 4 p.m. tomorrow at Hurd Hall, at the hospital at 600 N. Wolfe St.Dr. Robinson, who was 76, died Aug. 16 at Roland Park Place after an apparent heart attack.He led the orthopedic surgery department at Johns Hopkins Hospital.He is survived by his wife, the former Beatrice Clark; a son, Robert A. Robinson Jr. of Norfolk, Va.; three daughters, Anne Hooker of Zurich, Switzerland, and Barbara Graham and Elizabeth Wells, both of Middlesex, N.Y., and three grandchildren.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
Dr. Gerhard Schmeisser, a retired orthopedic surgeon, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine faculty member and an innovator in artificial-limb technology, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Sept. 23 at Roland Park Place. He was 86 and had lived on Gibson Island. Born in Baltimore and raised on Tunbridge Road in Homeland, he was the son of Gerhard Schmeisser, an investment banker, and the former Katherine Fleming, a homemaker. He attended the Calvert School and was a 1944 graduate of the Gilman School, where he was captain of the lacrosse and wresting teams.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2001
Dr. Lee H. Riley Jr., a retired professor of orthopedics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died of cancer Thursday at his Homeland residence. He was 68. Dr. Riley, a professor emeritus of orthopedic surgery and former chairman of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Hopkins who retired in 1997, was a leader in the use of artificial joints. One of the first surgeons in the country to replace a diseased hip with an artificial joint, he was involved 30 years ago in the design and creation of a total knee replacement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Alec John Cosgarea, a champion McDonogh School swimmer who also competed for the North Baltimore Aquatic Club, died Monday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center after being injured in an automobile accident. The McDonogh senior and Owings Mills resident was 17. Mr. Cosgarea was on his way home Monday evening after participating in a NBAC competition at the club's Meadowbrook facility in Mount Washington when he lost control of his 2006 Ford Fusion on Greenspring Avenue and hit a tree.
NEWS
January 3, 1991
Dr. E. David Weinberg, a retired orthopedic surgeon, died yesterday of heart failure at Roland Park Place, where he had lived for about three years.Private services were planned for Dr. Weinberg, who was 95 and had lived in Pikesville for more than 40 years.He was in private practice from 1927 until his retirement in 1975 and was chief of staff from 1958 until 1965 at what is now the Harbor Hospital Center. He was chief of orthopedic surgery at the hospital and a member of its board until about four months ago.He was an assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at Johns Hopkins University medical school.
NEWS
February 18, 2002
Dr. Dennis W. Lennox, 56, joint replacement surgeon Dr. Dennis Wesley Lennox, one of the region's leading joint-replacement surgeons, died Wednesday of brain cancer at his home in Roland Park. He was 56. Since July, Dr. Lennox was chief of the Johns Hopkins Division of Arthritis Surgery at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was an expert in hip and knee replacements who also was known for his orthopedic inventions, including a total hip prosthesis. He published more than 50 scientific articles and was assistant editor of the Journal of Arthroplasty.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 30, 2009
Alan M. Levine, director of the Alvin & Lois Lapidus Cancer Institute for Sinai Hospital and Northwest Hospital Center and an internationally known orthopedic oncologist, died Sunday . The Pikesville resident was 61. Dr. Levine was exercising at the LifeBridge Health and Fitness Center in Pikesville on Sunday morning when he was stricken with a heart attack.. "Alan's death is a shock and a huge loss. He was an extraordinary figure with a bigger-than-life personality. He had an enormous talent for doing a lot of things well," said Warren A. Green, president and chief executive officer of LifeBridge Health, which owns and operates Sinai Hospital and Northwest Hospital Center.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 27, 2009
John Jerome "Jack" Tansey, a well-known Baltimore orthopedic surgeon who was also an accomplished horseman and gardener, died Monday of lung cancer at the Charlestown retirement community. He was 89. Dr. Tansey, the son of a dentist and a homemaker, was born and raised in East Hampton, Mass., and graduated in 1939 from the Williston Northampton School in his hometown. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1943 from Brown University in Providence, R.I., he graduated in 1945 from the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
June 29, 2005
Dr. Thomas Edward Gillespie, a hand and orthopedic surgeon on the faculty of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, died of cancer Sunday at his Millersville home. He was 65. Born in Hazleton, Pa., he earned a bachelor of science degree from Bucknell University. He was a graduate of the Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington and served in the Navy during the Vietnam War aboard the hospital ship Repose and the submarine Kamehameha. He left the military as a lieutenant commander.
NEWS
February 11, 2011
As a physician who has devoted 25 years to caring for patients in our great state, I was deeply distressed to read Jay Hancock's column attacking the integrity of orthopedic surgeons and other doctors who rely on modern tools such as MRI and CT scans to diagnose patients' injuries and illnesses ( "Orthopedist-owned MRIs a recipe for soaring costs," Feb. 9). Mr. Hancock's claim that orthopedic surgeons drive MRI utilization and cost is contradicted by federal government data showing that more than 80 percent of all advanced imaging services paid by Medicare go to radiologists and free-standing radiology centers, not to orthopedic surgeons and other treating physicians.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
Dr. Kenneth F. Spence Jr., a highly regarded Baltimore orthopedic surgeon who was a Vietnam War veteran, died Monday of leukemia at Hooper House Hospice in Forest Hill. The longtime Columbia resident was 79. The son of a civil engineer and a homemaker, Dr. Spence was born and raised in Hagerstown, where he was a 1949 graduate of Hagerstown High School. After graduating from what is now Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Va., in 1953, he enrolled at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, where he earned a medical degree in 1957.
NEWS
February 11, 2011
As a physician who has devoted 25 years to caring for patients in our great state, I was deeply distressed to read Jay Hancock's column attacking the integrity of orthopedic surgeons and other doctors who rely on modern tools such as MRI and CT scans to diagnose patients' injuries and illnesses ( "Orthopedist-owned MRIs a recipe for soaring costs," Feb. 9). Mr. Hancock's claim that orthopedic surgeons drive MRI utilization and cost is contradicted by federal government data showing that more than 80 percent of all advanced imaging services paid by Medicare go to radiologists and free-standing radiology centers, not to orthopedic surgeons and other treating physicians.
HEALTH
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
As running back Ray Rice recovers from a bruised knee that could keep him from playing Sunday in Pittsburgh, medical experts say it will take one thing before Rice is back to his previous form — time. Rice, who missed a scheduled appearance with Baltimore Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake Tuesday at the Inner Harbor as part of a health campaign, said via Twitter that he hopes to return "asap," and a source close to Rice said Tuesday that the injury "is not that bad. He's walking around like his regular self.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 30, 2009
Alan M. Levine, director of the Alvin & Lois Lapidus Cancer Institute for Sinai Hospital and Northwest Hospital Center and an internationally known orthopedic oncologist, died Sunday . The Pikesville resident was 61. Dr. Levine was exercising at the LifeBridge Health and Fitness Center in Pikesville on Sunday morning when he was stricken with a heart attack.. "Alan's death is a shock and a huge loss. He was an extraordinary figure with a bigger-than-life personality. He had an enormous talent for doing a lot of things well," said Warren A. Green, president and chief executive officer of LifeBridge Health, which owns and operates Sinai Hospital and Northwest Hospital Center.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,katherine.dunn@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
Giving up football was not easy for Tim Frazier. After a fine career as a quarterback at Poly and at Hampton University, Frazier had an opportunity to play in the Arena Football League, but he decided it was time to move on to a new passion - medicine. He opted for medical school at Virginia to become an orthopedic surgeon. "I know it was the right thing to do. It was still really difficult. I didn't go to a UVa. game for the first few years, because I felt I was still supposed to be playing and I couldn't bear to watch it, but after a couple years, I was like, 'Yeah, those days are done.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 27, 2009
John Jerome "Jack" Tansey, a well-known Baltimore orthopedic surgeon who was also an accomplished horseman and gardener, died Monday of lung cancer at the Charlestown retirement community. He was 89. Dr. Tansey, the son of a dentist and a homemaker, was born and raised in East Hampton, Mass., and graduated in 1939 from the Williston Northampton School in his hometown. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1943 from Brown University in Providence, R.I., he graduated in 1945 from the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
Dr. Gerhard Schmeisser, a retired orthopedic surgeon, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine faculty member and an innovator in artificial-limb technology, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Sept. 23 at Roland Park Place. He was 86 and had lived on Gibson Island. Born in Baltimore and raised on Tunbridge Road in Homeland, he was the son of Gerhard Schmeisser, an investment banker, and the former Katherine Fleming, a homemaker. He attended the Calvert School and was a 1944 graduate of the Gilman School, where he was captain of the lacrosse and wresting teams.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2000
It started, more or less, with a cup of coffee after a movie, but quickly grew into a project that will mean a $15 million building project and 120 additional staff members for Sinai Hospital. Dr. Jerome Reichmister, Sinai's chief of orthopedic surgery, chatted over coffee with Dr. Dror Paley, an orthopedic surgeon specializing in the exotic field of limb lengthening, after both had seen "American Beauty." More conversations followed, with Paley and his co-director, Dr. John E. Herzenberg, eventually agreeing to move their Maryland Center for Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction to Sinai from Kernan Hospital, part of the University of Maryland Medical System.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | September 30, 2005
Sylvia Brickman was 88 years old when she decided to have a breast reduction. Her children were against it, but Brickman, a Philadelphia resident, had gone from a 32A to a 38DD after having children. The operation that transformed her into a 36C was one of the best decisions she has ever made. "I didn't do it for anything other than comfort," Brickman said. "I just didn't like being black and blue from the bras and being so uncomfortable." Doctors once resisted operating on seniors unless something was broken, blocked or bleeding.
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