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By Reported by Frank P. L. Somerville | February 3, 1994
Archpriest Peter E. Gillquist, a former evangelical Protestant leader of Campus Crusade for Christ who converted to Eastern TC Orthodoxy, will speak at services Saturday night and Sunday morning marking the first anniversary of the founding of the Holy Cross Antiochian Orthodox Mission in Catonsville.Father Gillquist, head of missions and evangelism for the Antiochian Orthodox Church in America, recently met in England with a group of Anglican priests and lay people considering a move to Orthodoxy.
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NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | August 25, 2010
Regarding Thomas Schaller's commentary ("The problem is not Islam but orthodoxy," Aug. 24), religion is, has been, and will forever be, the bane of mankind's existence. Toni Jordon, Severna Park
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 1996
HAVANA, Cuba -- Warning of what it described as a campaign by the United States to "deceive, confuse and dismantle" the Cuban revolution, the Cuban Communist Party has called for greater ideological and economic orthodoxy, threatening "severe punishment" for those who fail to comply.Party leaders also sharply criticized features of the limited opening of the economy in the last three years that has rescued the Cuban economy from the brink of collapse, demanding increased self-reliance and discipline instead.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | August 23, 2010
Should the proposed Park51 Islamic Community Center be located so closely to the Ground Zero site in New York City? Constitutionally, this is a no-brainer. The First Amendment is pretty clear about the right of citizens to exercise religious freedom. Symbolically, however, the controversy is much thornier. This is hallowed ground, a site of terror and tragedy created by the horrific, hateful actions of Islamic radicals. To deny that is to willfully ignore history. Retired firefighter Tim Brown, a Sept.
NEWS
By Frank P.L. Somerville and Frank P.L. Somerville,Staff Writer | November 30, 1993
Rabbi Herman N. Neuberger, 75, has been part of Ner Israel Rabbinical College for 55 of its 60 years and its guiding spirit as president much of that time. His and the institution's ways are interchangeable.When the rabbi arrived in 1938 from his native Bavaria, the 5-year-old Orthodox yeshiva had fewer than 40 students in residence.Now, as the quiet Owings Mills campus on leafy Mount Wilson Lane prepares to welcome alumni, parents and benefactors to a 60th anniversary celebration next Tuesday, Ner Israel has 200 students in its high school division, 300 at the college level and 120 taking post-graduate courses.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | August 25, 2010
Regarding Thomas Schaller's commentary ("The problem is not Islam but orthodoxy," Aug. 24), religion is, has been, and will forever be, the bane of mankind's existence. Toni Jordon, Severna Park
NEWS
October 3, 1991
Patriarch Dimitrios I, 76, spiritual leader of the world's 300 million Eastern Orthodox Christians and a champion of Christian unity, died yesterday of a heart attack in Istanbul, Turkey. Dimitrios held the title Archbishop of Constantinople and was primus inter pares, first among equals, of the five senior Eastern Christian leaders. He presided over worldwide Orthodoxy, which divided into 14 churches of many ethnic groups. Six million followers of Eastern Orthodoxy live in the United States.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | February 1, 1993
"Father Gary" became "Father Gregory" yesterday, but a lot more than a name change was involved.While the Rev. Gary Mathewes-Green, former rector of an Episcopal church in Ellicott City, was being ordained an Eastern Orthodox priest and given a new name in Bethesda, an Orthodox bishop from England -- himself a former Anglican -- was telling a Baltimore congregation that Orthodoxy's future depends on people choosing it rather than being born into it.At the Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Annunciation, at Preston Street and Maryland Avenue, Bishop Kallistos Ware, an Oxford University teacher, author and leading exponent of his faith, said, "Orthodoxy will only survive in the 21st century if we choose to be Orthodox . . . by inner conversion, by commitment."
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 8, 1998
NORTH COUNTY High School's Parent- Booster Club has picked a catchy name to attract you to an annual event. The Beary Best Christmas Craft Show is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the school, 10 E. First Ave. in Ferndale.Michele Keeler, chairwoman, said 70 craft dealers will have many unusual items for sale. They will include personalized mailboxes, butterfly houses, filled baskets, cat and dog beds and personalized children's books with your child's name inserted throughout the story.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Staff Writer | January 2, 1994
Immeasurable amounts of human energy, intellectual and otherwise, have been spent on one of history's most persistent yet least successful endeavors: the creation of orthodoxy, of "right thinking" and its coerced enforcement.There may be no other idea over 33 centuries as hardy as the notion that one system of acceptable belief could be defined, that one permitted way of looking at things could be maintained.From Moses' revelation that God must not be "reviled," to today's demands for the suppression of words that do injury (the unfortunately misnamed movement for "political correctness")
NEWS
By Janet Hook and Jim Oliphant and Janet Hook and Jim Oliphant,Tribune Newspapers | August 27, 2009
WASHINGTON - -As the nation mourned the death of Sen. Edward M. Kennedy on Wednesday, President Barack Obama and members of Congress began to size up what the loss of the legendary deal maker and the liberals' most powerful voice will mean for Democrats as they seek to redirect the nation's domestic and foreign policies. Shell-shocked but not surprised by the end of Kennedy's yearlong battle with brain cancer, many Democrats worried that no one could fill his shoes as Congress moves toward a crucial juncture in the drive to overhaul health care - his lifelong passion.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | July 13, 2007
Erica Jong, the writer who schooled a generation about women's desires and the pleasures of commitment-free sex, has some new bits of knowledge to impart as she pours her passions into grandmotherhood. The secrets to staying young, she told a full ballroom at the Sheraton Columbia Hotel on Tuesday, are laughter, cardio, yoga and teaching the next generation. The other recipe -- aside from sex -- is grandchildren, she said. "Generativity" is the stage of life where one invests more in the next generation than in oneself, she said, adding, "I want to point out that very few people get to that."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2001
It was 50 years ago, schmoozing at a deli with friends over a kosher corned beef sandwich, that Jacob A. Max hatched the idea for a synagogue for a growing Jewish neighborhood in Northwest Baltimore. Since its inception in 1952, the Liberty Jewish Center has moved a couple of times, absorbed other synagogues and changed names. It has seen its share of peaks and valleys. But Max is still at the helm. What he founded as the Liberty Jewish Center in Howard Park is now called the Moses Montefiore-Anshe Emunah Hebrew Congregation in Greenspring.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 25, 2001
WASHINGTON -- That was one mushy pie in the face that now former Republican Sen. Jim Jeffords inflicted on President Bush in one of the most historic and significant defections ever from a political party. Mr. Jeffords, in his customary mild-mannered fashion, cast his reasons for leaving the GOP to become an independent in terms of disagreements with the party, not just Mr. Bush. But the practical effect of his action is to throw a huge monkey wrench into Mr. Bush's plans to deliver a conservative agenda reminiscent of the Reagan years.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila | October 21, 2000
NEWS OF the death of Gus Hall was a lead item on Moscow's independent NTV television this week. And why not? During the chilliest days of the Cold War, when American mainstream political visitors were rare, the Kremlin always welcomed the longtime leader of the U.S. Communist Party as a head of state. I met Mr. Hall a couple of times in Moscow in the late 1980s. By that time, the Soviet Union's game was pretty much over, but he was still whisked around in a black limousine. It was all make-believe, of course.
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | September 20, 2000
IT SEEMS AS IF the major presidential candidates are running more for the schoolhouse than the White House. George W. Bush brags that he has visited more than 100 schools so far. Al Gore has promised weekly, all-day school visits during the campaign. Both proclaim K-12 education as the No. 1 issue. That's no surprise, since that's how voters rank it. But what is revolutionary is the nationalization of school politics. Only a few years ago, local control of schools was sacred political dogma.
NEWS
February 8, 1996
PAT BUCHANAN'S smashing victory over Phil Gramm in Louisiana exposes deep ideological differences between social conservatives and economic conservatives in the Republican Party.As he heads for next week's all-candidate Iowa contest, Mr. Buchanan touts himself not only as a "conservative of the heart" but the "Huey Long of the Nineties." He is a populist, protectionist, isolationist, ultra-nationalist and an enthusiastic baiter of big business -- in other words the antithesis of Republican orthodoxy.
NEWS
By George F. Will | April 30, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Last week, the Supreme Court heard arguments in a case that, if correctly decided, will strengthen First Amendment freedoms of speech and association, and demonstrate that much of John McCain's strength in the primaries resulted from state election laws inimical to those freedoms. The question at issue is whether California's "blanket" primary abridges the freedom of individuals to associate in political parties that serve as their right to express their chosen philosophies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Adam Spiegel and Adam Spiegel,Special to the Sun | April 30, 2000
Once again, the Jews are victims. A new wave of post-Holocaust Jewish intellectuals has revised the rules for remembering their 6 million dead. Silence and muted utterance, this movement insists, are the appropriate modes of expression. This revisionist position denies Jews access to the healing process through redemptive expressions of grief. Until now, such catharsis has found voice in literature, music, painting and sculpture as a source of relief from unremitting pain. Ironically, the new orthodoxy is reminiscent of the policy of stunted speech and restricted expression that was rigidly enforced by Nazis in the death camps.
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